dcsimg

Workshop Functional Improvement Projects You Built.

Viewing 20 posts - 281 through 300 (of 852 total)
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  • #687358
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Nope, no vehicles allowed (it’s set up as a full functioning woodworking shop).
    Unfortunately, cars were parked in there before it was enclosed, so there are ruts in the asphalt floor. Makes keeping tools aligned a bit of a chore – but it works.

    I have a similar issue with the floor in my shop. It’s a converted garage which has been added to twice. There is the original floor which is very rough concrete, a concrete extension at the rear of the shop and an asphalt extension along one side. Casters are out of the question for me.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #687370
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Nope, no vehicles allowed (it’s set up as a full functioning woodworking shop).

    Nice space for a woodworking shop. Plenty of floor space for tools.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #687431
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    @DirtyWhiteBoy – Yeah, parking a car in a location that is also a workshop, just too much hassle moving things around.



    @Boschmanbrian
    – Not too much of an issue with a whole lot of people coming by, but all it would take is one person messing with the connector and ending up opening an air escape path – and the compressor would end up running full-time until I got home to shut it down. Not a good situation.



    @smallerstick
    – Uneven floors can be a ‘chore’. Agree that casters are out of the question, with uneven floors you have to graduate to ‘wheels’ over casters. 🙂
    I get to re-level things after the seasonal changes also (frost heaves).



    @theamcguy
    – ‘nice’ is a relative term. 🙂
    More space can always be used.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #687445

    @MTRoads ah yes, I didn’t think about that, good point, I just assumed that most people would know how to do that, I keep forgetting that not everyone is knowledgeable and have hands on experience

    #687681
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    I’m thinking more along the lines of youngsters that come by with bikes/flat tires. They find a hose and valve that are not working properly, fill their tire and leave the bad valve connected.
    Strange thoughts I know, but I’d rather just put a shut-off valve inside and not have to worry about it.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #687696
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    but I’d rather just put a shut-off valve inside and not have to worry about it.

    Good idea, shut off valves are necessary with an air system.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #687705

    I’m thinking more along the lines of youngsters that come by with bikes/flat tires. They find a hose and valve that are not working properly, fill their tire and leave the bad valve connected.
    Strange thoughts I know, but I’d rather just put a shut-off valve inside and not have to worry about it.

    No definitely nothing wrong with thinking about that,
    I probably would do the same.

    #687729
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Nope, no vehicles allowed (it’s set up as a full functioning woodworking shop).
    Unfortunately, cars were parked in there before it was enclosed, so there are ruts in the asphalt floor. Makes keeping tools aligned a bit of a chore – but it works.

    I have a similar issue with the floor in my shop. It’s a converted garage which has been added to twice. There is the original floor which is very rough concrete, a concrete extension at the rear of the shop and an asphalt extension along one side. Casters are out of the question for me.

    My concrete shop/garage floor was a mess also. Knowing it was to be completely taken over by shop space I installed a sub floor system which also included running all the wiring and dust collection piping in. It was a lot of work, but my feet are happier and warmer and I can roll things around as well. Well worth the effort and money.

    #687740
    yellaD
    Pro

    Yes, @doobie‘s shop is SICK. Running the cables under is smart.

    #687742
    Doobie
    Moderator

    My concrete shop/garage floor was a mess also. Knowing it was to be completely taken over by shop space I installed a sub floor system which also included running all the wiring and dust collection piping in. It was a lot of work, but my feet are happier and warmer and I can roll things around as well. Well worth the effort and money.

    Yes, @doobie‘s shop is SICK. Running the cables under is smart.

    Thanks Andy!

    I thought I had already posted some pics of my shop floor build from 15 years ago in this thread before, but I guess I haven’t.

    Basically, I built two seperate floor ‘modules’ that each have perimeter channels with removable panels that I ran my electrical and 4 in PVC DC piping underneath.

    Each module also has remaoveable panels accross their centers that I can also use for wood storage of non-longish pieces. The panels are removable using one of those suction cuppy things.

    I also included other photos of where everything ultimately went. It was a lot of work, but in such a tight space, every inch of space counts.

    #687793
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I thought I had already posted some pics of my shop floor build from 15 years ago in this thread before, but I guess I haven’t.

    Wow what a build!! Where is that shop at?

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #687803
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I thought I had already posted some pics of my shop floor build from 15 years ago in this thread before, but I guess I haven’t.

    Wow what a build!! Where is that shop at?

    It’s basically our single car garage attached to our house that I transformed into my shop.

    #687808
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I thought I had already posted some pics of my shop floor build from 15 years ago in this thread before, but I guess I haven’t.

    Wow what a build!! Where is that shop at?

    It’s basically our single car garage attached to our house that I transformed into my shop.

    I see Ridgid tools in there

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #687810
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    Nope, no vehicles allowed (it’s set up as a full functioning woodworking shop).
    Unfortunately, cars were parked in there before it was enclosed, so there are ruts in the asphalt floor. Makes keeping tools aligned a bit of a chore – but it works.

    I have a similar issue with the floor in my shop. It’s a converted garage which has been added to twice. There is the original floor which is very rough concrete, a concrete extension at the rear of the shop and an asphalt extension along one side. Casters are out of the question for me.

    My concrete shop/garage floor was a mess also. Knowing it was to be completely taken over by shop space I installed a sub floor system which also included running all the wiring and dust collection piping in. It was a lot of work, but my feet are happier and warmer and I can roll things around as well. Well worth the effort and money.

    I’m assuming you had a good amount of headspace in order to add subflooring with enough room for the DC piping and other items.
    I thought about doing the same, but then I remembered the frost heave issues I have and just decide to leave things as they are for now.
    Floor in the next shop is going to be a lot different though. 🙂

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #687812
    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    @Doobie,
    Just went though all the pictures above – pretty darn slick setup you have there.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #687816
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I see Ridgid tools in there

    Yes. My drill press and 6in jointer are still around and have served me well. They are the older ‘Made in America’ grey line Ridgid. I think they were made in Tenessee somehwere IIRC.

    But the radial arm saw is gone. I was never using it and it was a huge space hog. I gave it away to a client about two years ago now. He’s been using it. At least it got saved from the dump. Habitat Restore didn’t even want it for free even if I brought it there myself. While I only paid $350 or so buying it as the display model at HD 15 years ago or so, I always felt it was underpowered anyways. One of my few bad tool buying decisions.

    Can anybody figure out where the lathe is in there? There’s a full size Craftsman lathe in there. Can anybody figure out where it is?

    #687828
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Yes. My drill press and 6in jointer are still around and have served me well. They are the older ‘Made in America’ grey line Ridgid. I think they were made in Tenessee somehwere IIRC.

    They must be good ones then.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #687836
    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    Can anybody figure out where the lathe is in there? There’s a full size Craftsman lathe in there. Can anybody figure out where it is?

    I have looked and can’t see it.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #687837
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Can anybody figure out where the lathe is in there? There’s a full size Craftsman lathe in there.

    Is it missing?? When’s the last time you saw it ??

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #687838
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Can anybody figure out where the lathe is in there? There’s a full size Craftsman lathe in there.

    Is it missing?? When’s the last time you saw it ??

    It’s never moved from when I built it out/in that area where it lies 15 years ago.

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