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Words of wisdom for young folks in the trades

Viewing 20 posts - 101 through 120 (of 139 total)
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  • #359643
    EthanB
    Pro
    South Kingstown, RI

    We pee in the woods all the time. I ask the customer their preference, port-a-john(their cost, obviously), a dedicated bathroom or the woods. If a guy needs to #2 he can drive to the nearest gas station/McD’s on my dime. If we’re more than 10 minutes from a place where they can reasonable take an emergency deuce then we’re getting a port-a-john.

    Most people don’t want me to park a crapper at their house for a month, has been my experience. They’d rather have use peeing in the woods, or behind the shed…

    #359647
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    If I am going to be on a job longer than a few days and there isn’t a public restroom pretty close to the job site I rent a porta-jon. I like having a crapper close by – nothing worse than having to take a dump a holding it in for a 10 minute drive to the nearest public restroom.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #359654
    AndyG
    Pro

    Chad and I are brothers with different mothers! He’s the kind of guy, if young tradespeople will watch, they ll learn a whole lot and do well .

    #359730
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I like having a crapper close by – nothing worse than having to take a dump a holding it in for a 10 minute drive to the nearest public restroom.

    I’ve worked is some hoods over here that after a big night the chitter was so polluted that it couldn’t be used…. I really don’t like 5gl. buckets.

    #359731
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    I like having a crapper close by – nothing worse than having to take a dump a holding it in for a 10 minute drive to the nearest public restroom.

    I’ve worked is some hoods over here that after a big night the chitter was so polluted that it couldn’t be used…. I really don’t like 5gl. buckets.

    Most of the jobs I put Porta-Jons on are out in the sticks so nobody messes with them.

    Thanks @AndyG!

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #359750
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    That is one of my first instructions to new hires. “Don’t crap in the rose bushes or any other thorny bush,

    Who wants to be poked in the a55 and if he does better watch out when you bend over to nail.

    #359824
    AndyG
    Pro

    Sorry I got this started!!

    #436638
    BeardedCarpenter
    Pro
    Winsted, CT

    I’m probably not old enough to offer any real advise, but I wish I would have been told half of this stuff when I was younger.

    Except the board stretcher thing…..that’s just cruel. I watched it happen to a guy fresh out of high school and he had NO idea he was being messed with!

    I tried the board stretcher thing on an apprentice this summer. I even explained to him that he needed be careful not to over-stretch, because the boards gets narrower as the get longer. But he just looked at me and said, “Oh, yeah, is that in a box labeled B.S.?”

    #436643
    redwood
    Pro

    I’m probably not old enough to offer any real advise, but I wish I would have been told half of this stuff when I was younger.

    Except the board stretcher thing…..that’s just cruel. I watched it happen to a guy fresh out of high school and he had NO idea he was being messed with!

    I tried the board stretcher thing on an apprentice this summer. I even explained to him that he needed be careful not to over-stretch, because the boards gets narrower as the get longer. But he just looked at me and said, “Oh, yeah, is that in a box labeled B.S.?”

    That sounds like a good hire.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #436650
    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    Some really great advises in here. I hope I can remember a lot off them when I’m in the field.
    Due to I’m new to everything I really enjoy and listen deeply what my buddy tells and teaches. I like to learn new things

    "If you're going to do something, do it right the first time"
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    Palm Springs, CA

    #436664
    BeardedCarpenter
    Pro
    Winsted, CT

    As a guy who’s just finishing his first full year in the building trade, a lot of the advice given here resonates with what I’ve learned.

    If you are an apprentice please read through this thread. Much seems like common sense–like work harding, asking questions, putting your phone away, shutting up in front of the client, showing up on time, etc–but all these things need to be said at some point.

    Funny how the only point up for debate is peeing on the job site.

    #436665

    Some really great advises in here. I hope I can remember a lot off them when I’m in the field.
    Due to I’m new to everything I really enjoy and listen deeply what my buddy tells and teaches. I like to learn new things

    Don’t worry about remembering, you’ll catch on

    #436684
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Some really great advises in here. I hope I can remember a lot off them when I’m in the field.
    Due to I’m new to everything I really enjoy and listen deeply what my buddy tells and teaches. I like to learn new things

    @madman_us – thought because I did the estimates and knew what we built with I had a leg up on building. Not the case, whole different world when actually doing the buidling vs just talking about it. Things I learned: 1. No two jobs are ever the same. 2. Never ever assume anything. 3. Your buddy may get tired of you asking questions, but ask anyway…he will thank you later. 4. Always respect the HO’s and their property. 5. Never answer a HO question out of fear of looking dumb…excuse yourself and go ask if you dont know the answer. 6. Take notes if you have to. 7. Respect the trade and the craft. Don’t be in it just the sake of money.

    Good luck

    #436701
    AndyG
    Pro

    Make yourself useful. Jump in and help do what needs done .

    Get out of the vehicle putting on a tool belt . (that’s the vehicle you showed up on time in.) Leave the energy drink in the car.

    Wear a tape measure like its part of your body .

    Pay attention. Be engaged in what is happening . For one, it is safer . Two, pros work fast….we need that board , tile or whatever now …and another . We need you mentally here, not just a body. The people that go places in life are the ones that pay attention.

    Cell phone or job: you decide.

    Learn the art of having a cool head .

    Protect your employer ….don’t create liability. Be clean, helpful and service oriented . show respect for the equipment , the fellow workers , the client and their property. If the paint is the wrong kind, and the client gets irate, just say , Mam, please don’t worry at all….my boss will get this worked out just fine .

    Dont promise a client something if you aren’t 100 percent sure it can be done. It’s better to say ..I ll report we need a dumpster rather than “this trash WILL BE gone today”, if it can’t .

    Help. Help unload, clean up, load up..whatever . if you are a helper, help. Furthermore, be the best helper on the job. Make guys go to the boss and say “give me this kid every day.”

    Don’t blow ALL the money we help you make . But a few good hand tools, some sturdy clothes, a thermos . Investing a little in your occupation shows us something.

    Have some faith . it’s a huge, lifelong learning curve out here ….and peoples homes and remodels aren’t going to be Made in China…this is a good industry. We better peoples lives, property values and safeguard them .

    At the end of the day, say this : Hey Boss, thank you . where do I need to be and when in the morning , and is there anything special I need ? He’ ll appreciate that,he or she has a lot on their mind.

    Welcome aboard,
    Andy

    #436742
    utopia78
    Pro
    Toronto, ON

    Wear your hard hat, safety glasses and a pair of good condition work boots.

    A Working Pro since 2004

    #436754
    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    Some really great advises in here. I hope I can remember a lot off them when I’m in the field.
    Due to I’m new to everything I really enjoy and listen deeply what my buddy tells and teaches. I like to learn new things

    @madman_us – thought because I did the estimates and knew what we built with I had a leg up on building. Not the case, whole different world when actually doing the buidling vs just talking about it. Things I learned: 1. No two jobs are ever the same. 2. Never ever assume anything. 3. Your buddy may get tired of you asking questions, but ask anyway…he will thank you later. 4. Always respect the HO’s and their property. 5. Never answer a HO question out of fear of looking dumb…excuse yourself and go ask if you dont know the answer. 6. Take notes if you have to. 7. Respect the trade and the craft. Don’t be in it just the sake of money.

    Good luck

    Thanks @TaraC

    "If you're going to do something, do it right the first time"
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    Palm Springs, CA

    #436800
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    lol here is wisdom for the people working with the millennials hahaha

    #436884
    BeardedCarpenter
    Pro
    Winsted, CT

    Be patient when your boss isn’t having you do the skilled work right away. On your first few jobs you’ll be setting up, carrying stuff, cleaning, and maybe the easy repetitive jobs like back nailing plywood or installing hurricane ties and joist hangers. But if you do those jobs well and show that you care, your boss will slowly give you more skilled work to do.

    #436889

    My dad would tell me to always do the best at everything I did, no matter how small the task, except for mixing/slinging mortar. He said if you were too good at mixing mud, the Mason’s wouldn’t teach you anything else and you would always be a mud slinger.

    Anything is possible if your wallet is thick enough ~ my father

    #436891
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    My dad would tell me to always do the best at everything I did, no matter how small the task, except for mixing/slinging mortar. He said if you were too good at mixing mud, the Mason’s wouldn’t teach you anything else and you would always be a mud slinger.

    Your dad is a wise man Garrett!

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

Viewing 20 posts - 101 through 120 (of 139 total)
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