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Woodworking Projects. V 2.0

This topic contains 544 replies, has 24 voices, and was last updated by  RonW 3 days, 21 hours ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 545 total)
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  • #668380

    RonW
    Pro
    Holladay, Tn

    Had a little fun with my girls last night and glued up some finger jointed boxes I’ve had sitting around for a couple of years. I think they had a good time and it was their first time using wood glue and clamps.

    That’s what it’s all about. Enjoy it while you can!

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #668396

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    Had a little fun with my girls last night and glued up some finger jointed boxes I’ve had sitting around for a couple of years. I think they had a good time and it was their first time using wood glue and clamps.

    That’s what it’s all about. Enjoy it while you can!

    I am. I want to get them out there more now that they’re a little older (8 and almost 6). I really want them comfortable (if not proficient) with power tools. It’s such a leg up to be able to tinker with things (and hopefully fix them, lol).

    Charlie
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    #668429

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    My son picked up a mitersaw on CL. To give it a test run and check for acuracy he made this shelf for a friend.

    Looks like he got a good deal on the saw. Nice work.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #668512

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    My son picked up a mitersaw on CL. To give it a test run and check for acuracy he made this shelf for a friend.

    That cool project. That will be a nice shelf.

    Greg

    Work Smarter Not Harder

    #670416

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    I built my wife and myself a bed a while back and it’s served us alright but it was a queen size bed and a little small (both our girls come to bed with us in the middle of the night). Recently, a friend got a free mattress but it ended up being the wrong size (Cal King) for their king bed so they got the right size and gave us the mattress (it was unused). So now I need to build a new frame for this mattress but all I have is the wood from the old bed (all 2x10s – six five footers and two that are around 83”. I’ll be able to use the longer ones as they are for the short sides of the Cal King (73”) but I’m trying to figure out a way to join two of the shorter sections to make lengths long enough for the long edges of the mattress (84”).

    I spoke to a friend of mine on IG about different joints to use, and he dissuaded me from my oringal intent – a single large dovetail, but said one of my later ideas might work. I’ll put pictures of my sketches down below but basically it’ll be a modified half lap (and probably a bit longer of a joint than the sketch would have you think).

    Anyone have any other ideas of how to join two planks end to end in a way that will be strong enough to span the 84” length? I haven’t started yet, but I’m looking to get on it this week. TIA!

    Charlie
    __________________

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    #670426

    Clev08
    Pro

    I built my wife and myself a bed a while back and it’s served us alright but it was a queen size bed and a little small (both our girls come to bed with us in the middle of the night). Recently, a friend got a free mattress but it ended up being the wrong size (Cal King) for their king bed so they got the right size and gave us the mattress (it was unused). So now I need to build a new frame for this mattress but all I have is the wood from the old bed (all 2x10s – six five footers and two that are around 83”. I’ll be able to use the longer ones as they are for the short sides of the Cal King (73”) but I’m trying to figure out a way to join two of the shorter sections to make lengths long enough for the long edges of the mattress (84”).

    I spoke to a friend of mine on IG about different joints to use, and he dissuaded me from my oringal intent – a single large dovetail, but said one of my later ideas might work. I’ll put pictures of my sketches down below but basically it’ll be a modified half lap (and probably a bit longer of a joint than the sketch would have you think).

    Anyone have any other ideas of how to join two planks end to end in a way that will be strong enough to span the 84” length? I haven’t started yet, but I’m looking to get on it this week. TIA!

    I don’t have any specific ideas for the joint but I know that you are going to want as much face grain surface area to glue together (Think finger joint). Would it be possible to screw some plywood or OSB across the joint as well to add strength?

    #670449

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    Anyone have any other ideas of how to join two planks end to end in a way that will be strong enough to span the 84” length? I haven’t started yet, but I’m looking to get on it this week. TIA!

    Maybe something like this would work?

    https://www.instagram.com/woodiworkshop/

    #670465

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    I spoke to a friend of mine on IG about different joints to use, and he dissuaded me from my oringal intent – a single large dovetail, but said one of my later ideas might work. I’ll put pictures of my sketches down below but basically it’ll be a modified half lap (and probably a bit longer of a joint than the sketch would have you think).

    Anyone have any other ideas of how to join two planks end to end in a way that will be strong enough to span the 84” length? I haven’t started yet, but I’m looking to get on it this week. TIA!

    From what I undertand, it sounds like you’re looking to join two pieces of lumber in order to make the “headboard” and “footboard” sides, yes? If that’s the case then the joint won’t be supporting the full load of the bed. Most beds are made to support the weight of the mattress and occupant with the side rails, not the top and bottom. Assuming that’s your plan as well, it would probably be fine to do something like what you’ve sketched out (“Checkerboard half lap”). Have you used that joint in the past? I have never done one like that and would worry that it would be hard to get a tight fitting joint.

    If it were me I’d use a full width scarf joint, and make it as long as possible given the length of the timbers you’ve got. For added safety you could put a couple of dowels through the scarf joint as well, once the scarf is glued up. Good luck! I’ll be watching for progress with this!

    #670487

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    @clev08 I don’t have any plywood long enough, though the idea of reinforcing that way had occurred to me…a finger joint might not be a bad idea though, although, I’m not sure how I would accomplish that, since I’d be working on 5’ long pieces, and my finger jointing has always been done on my table saw…I’d need to figure something else out for this.

    @smallerstick that is such a cool joint! I think it’s a more complicated and probably much stronger version of what I was planning, I like that all parts of the joint connect with all other parts of the joint too. Might be hard to do with the tools I have on hand, but that might be the way I go.

    @mrfid actually, it will be the longest sides that I’ll be creating this way, so they will be holding the weight of the mattress. We’re s little strange (and short luckily) so we’ll be orienting the bed with a side as the head and foot boards, just to fit us all easier, but the slats will still run parallel to the short sides. I will probably end up using some sort of fifth leg under the center support, and that will remove some of the burden from the rails, but they will still need to carry the majority of the load.

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

    #670495

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    actually, it will be the longest sides that I’ll be creating this way, so they will be holding the weight of the mattress. We’re s little strange (and short luckily) so we’ll be orienting the bed with a side as the head and foot boards, just to fit us all easier, but the slats will still run parallel to the short sides. I will probably end up using some sort of fifth leg under the center support, and that will remove some of the burden from the rails, but they will still need to carry the majority of the load.

    Got it. I’d still go with a scarf joint pinned through with dowels I think. Unless you’ve done that checkerboard joint before, I’d be wary. Definitely try the joint on a couple pieces of scrap before you use your real wood. Take lots of pictures! I’m curious to know how it goes! I’m sure it’ll look great however it end up.

    #670499

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    @mrfid I know you’re right – a trial run is definitely a good idea, especially since I’ve never attempted something this big before (joint wise). But I hate the thought of all that time going into something that doesn’t get me closer to my end goal with the bed (I know it does in actuality, but I’m sure you know what I mean)

    But I think you’re right, and I will definitely take pictures along the way.

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

    #670500

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    I know you’re right – a trial run is definitely a good idea, especially since I’ve never attempted something this big before (joint wise). But I hate the thought of all that time going into something that doesn’t get me closer to my end goal with the bed (I know it does in actuality, but I’m sure you know what I mean)

    But I think you’re right, and I will definitely take pictures along the way.

    I get that instinct for sure. I just know how often I’ve screwed up something that I was attempting for the first time with nice wood and been pissed at myself later for it. A test joint would also confirm that the joint will be strong enough to support what it needs to. You’d feel worse to get the bed all made and then have it break soon after.

    #670502

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    Anyone have any other ideas of how to join two planks end to end in a way that will be strong enough to span the 84” length? I haven’t started yet, but I’m looking to get on it this week. TIA!

    Maybe something like this would work?

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/XkgA5RZQc_s?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allow=”autoplay; encrypted-media” allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    That is a pretty cool joint. I have never seen this joint before.

    I built my wife and myself a bed a while back and it’s served us alright but it was a queen size bed and a little small (both our girls come to bed with us in the middle of the night). Recently, a friend got a free mattress but it ended up being the wrong size (Cal King) for their king bed so they got the right size and gave us the mattress (it was unused). So now I need to build a new frame for this mattress but all I have is the wood from the old bed (all 2x10s – six five footers and two that are around 83”. I’ll be able to use the longer ones as they are for the short sides of the Cal King (73”) but I’m trying to figure out a way to join two of the shorter sections to make lengths long enough for the long edges of the mattress (84”).

    I spoke to a friend of mine on IG about different joints to use, and he dissuaded me from my oringal intent – a single large dovetail, but said one of my later ideas might work. I’ll put pictures of my sketches down below but basically it’ll be a modified half lap (and probably a bit longer of a joint than the sketch would have you think).

    Anyone have any other ideas of how to join two planks end to end in a way that will be strong enough to span the 84” length? I haven’t started yet, but I’m looking to get on it this week. TIA!

    I have seen a few YouTubers join boards together for length before.

    Greg

    Work Smarter Not Harder

    #670584

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    I know you’re right – a trial run is definitely a good idea, especially since I’ve never attempted something this big before (joint wise). But I hate the thought of all that time going into something that doesn’t get me closer to my end goal with the bed (I know it does in actuality, but I’m sure you know what I mean)

    But I think you’re right, and I will definitely take pictures along the way.

    I get that instinct for sure. I just know how often I’ve screwed up something that I was attempting for the first time with nice wood and been pissed at myself later for it. A test joint would also confirm that the joint will be strong enough to support what it needs to. You’d feel worse to get the bed all made and then have it break soon after.

    I definitely would hate for it to break after all the work of putting it together, but no worries on the “nice wood” front – it’s just standard dimensional lumber anyway, so I’m not out a ton of money for it. In fact, my wife dropped a little hint tonight that she’d rather just have me go get a long enough board if this process was going to take too long. We’re sleeping on the mattress on the floor right now, so she’s (understandably) a little impatient to have a frame again.

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

    #670621

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    I know you’re right – a trial run is definitely a good idea, especially since I’ve never attempted something this big before (joint wise). But I hate the thought of all that time going into something that doesn’t get me closer to my end goal with the bed (I know it does in actuality, but I’m sure you know what I mean)

    But I think you’re right, and I will definitely take pictures along the way.

    I get that instinct for sure. I just know how often I’ve screwed up something that I was attempting for the first time with nice wood and been pissed at myself later for it. A test joint would also confirm that the joint will be strong enough to support what it needs to. You’d feel worse to get the bed all made and then have it break soon after.

    I definitely would hate for it to break after all the work of putting it together, but no worries on the “nice wood” front – it’s just standard dimensional lumber anyway, so I’m not out a ton of money for it. In fact, my wife dropped a little hint tonight that she’d rather just have me go get a long enough board if this process was going to take too long. We’re sleeping on the mattress on the floor right now, so she’s (understandably) a little impatient to have a frame again.

    It might be wise to buy the right length of lumber for the job. It would save alot of time. It would be a shame to spend a lot of time making a board with what you have on hand. Then have break on you.

    Greg

    Work Smarter Not Harder

    #670642

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    I know you’re right – a trial run is definitely a good idea, especially since I’ve never attempted something this big before (joint wise). But I hate the thought of all that time going into something that doesn’t get me closer to my end goal with the bed (I know it does in actuality, but I’m sure you know what I mean)

    But I think you’re right, and I will definitely take pictures along the way.

    I get that instinct for sure. I just know how often I’ve screwed up something that I was attempting for the first time with nice wood and been pissed at myself later for it. A test joint would also confirm that the joint will be strong enough to support what it needs to. You’d feel worse to get the bed all made and then have it break soon after.

    I definitely would hate for it to break after all the work of putting it together, but no worries on the “nice wood” front – it’s just standard dimensional lumber anyway, so I’m not out a ton of money for it. In fact, my wife dropped a little hint tonight that she’d rather just have me go get a long enough board if this process was going to take too long. We’re sleeping on the mattress on the floor right now, so she’s (understandably) a little impatient to have a frame again.

    It might be wise to buy the right length of lumber for the job. It would save alot of time. It would be a shame to spend a lot of time making a board with what you have on hand. Then have break on you.

    But think about how cool it would be to do a fancy joint and have it work! Lol, I know the smart money would go for new parts but, still……

    https://www.instagram.com/woodiworkshop/

    #670646

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    @gtokley that is very true but as @smallerstick said, the allure of that cool joint and the required process and work is where all the fun is! Haha! I am going to give it a try at least and then, if it doesn’t go well enough, I’ll cave and head to the store.

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

    #670649

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    But think about how cool it would be to do a fancy joint and have it work! Lol, I know the smart money would go for new parts but, still……

    HAHA! I agree since it’s not my project. 🙂

    If you’re just using 2x SPF, then go buy two pieces of wood. Maybe $20 max there, yeah?

    Consider yourself spending maybe 2 hours to construct that joint (that’s pretty optimistic in my view… for me it would be more like 4 hours to do it twice). You’ve effectively paid yourself $10 an hour (or maybe less) for something that is almost certainly not as strong as a full length timber. If it was purpleheart or bocote or some other crazy wood I’d say go for it, but not for framing lumber. Feel free to disregard me, but that’s what I’d do.

    #670682

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    But think about how cool it would be to do a fancy joint and have it work! Lol, I know the smart money would go for new parts but, still……

    HAHA! I agree since it’s not my project. 🙂

    If you’re just using 2x SPF, then go buy two pieces of wood. Maybe $20 max there, yeah?

    Consider yourself spending maybe 2 hours to construct that joint (that’s pretty optimistic in my view… for me it would be more like 4 hours to do it twice). You’ve effectively paid yourself $10 an hour (or maybe less) for something that is almost certainly not as strong as a full length timber. If it was purpleheart or bocote or some other crazy wood I’d say go for it, but not for framing lumber. Feel free to disregard me, but that’s what I’d do.

    Nah, you’re right (and you agree with my wife, so really, no more to be said, lol!)

    I looked at it this morning, and after spending twenty minutes trying to figure out how I would even start jointing them (since they’re so much taller than my bench) I decided to drive to Lowes and picked up two 8’ 2×10’s. I’ll save the joinery for attaching them to the legs.

    Charlie
    __________________

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    #670990

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    Finished up the base for this little table. The through tenons are becoming my favourite joint for this type of job.

    Attachments:

    https://www.instagram.com/woodiworkshop/

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