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Woodworking Projects.

Viewing 20 posts - 541 through 560 (of 1,003 total)
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  • #622980
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Finished the stretchers today. I need to make the shelf, and re-examine the top. I’m considering rejoining the two top pieces as my joint wasn’t the tightest. Then the drawer and then it’s done. I’m, starting to think about finish. I’ve never worked with curly maple before, and I’m considering a few different options. I’ve read online that you can use the following with curly maple for nice results:

    1. Dewaxed shellac
    2. Tung oil (I’d probably use BLO since I have that on hand)
    3. Aniline dye followed by whatever finish.

    Any other options you all have used would certainly be considered as well.

    I’ll be sure to keep you all updated as this project starts to wrap up.

    Thanks for the updates, Bailey, coming along very nicely. The curly maple is going to be really special.
    I found this piece a while ago and saved it for reference, maybe you will find it useful
    http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/pop-goes-the-maple/

    Finished gluing up a set of shelves for a dining room wall today. They will be mounted over a narrow serving table also in pine. Both very plain and simple.

    I’m planning to use a water based poly as a finish. This will be a first for me. After many years I will be abandoning my Minwax WOP. Any suggestions? Do I use BLO as a base?

    I usually use a coat of BLO under water based poly. It adds a bit to it as the water based poly is pretty clear, unlike oil based which adds a bit of tone to the wood. One of my “go to” finishes, particularly on pine.

    First coat of water based poly will raise the grain. I hit it with about a 320 grit, then the second coat I go over with a scotch brite pad (green or grey), the 3rd coat finishes it off. You can get all 3 coats in a single day as it only takes an hour or two between coats with the poly. I usually let the BLO dry overnight.

    Oh, nice shelves BTW. Though I have come to expect anything you do is nice.

    The Danish oil is on and dry now. According to the MSDS sheet, it is mainly mineral spirits but whatever else is in it is now hard and dry and ready for final finish. I plan on doing the matching table first, then final finishing both pieces together, water based poly.
    Thanks for the sanding tips, sounds like a good way to go.

    That is interesting video I will have save that one and may try it someday.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #622997
    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Thanks for the updates, Bailey, coming along very nicely. The curly maple is going to be really special.
    I found this piece a while ago and saved it for reference, maybe you will find it useful
    http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/pop-goes-the-maple/

    Thanks for that link, Peter. Always helpful to have more options! I’ll let you guys know what I end up with for sure.

    #623068
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Finished gluing up a set of shelves for a dining room wall today. They will be mounted over a narrow serving table also in pine. Both very plain and simple.

    Nice job on the shelving @smallerstick.

    More pictures from the previous post:



    @mrfid
    ,
    That maple is gonna pop when done. Can’t wait to see the final project with finish. Great job.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #623069
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    The way I cut my mortises is with my drill press. I do also have a mortiser, but I seldom use it. I measure and drill the two ends first, then drill holes along the mortise leaving a space between each one. Then I go back and drill out the gaps between the holes.

    I meant to comment on this earlier but somehow forgot. I am like you, owned a mortising attachment but seldom used it. It seemed like such a hassle to set up all the time. Recently I had a project with 30 odd mortises, so dug out the attachment and set it up. I’m now a strong believer! The mortises are crisp, straight, perfectly located and need very little clean up if any to be glue ready. Bonus is the speed of cutting the mortises, way faster than drilling and trimming.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #623080

    The way I cut my mortises is with my drill press. I do also have a mortiser, but I seldom use it. I measure and drill the two ends first, then drill holes along the mortise leaving a space between each one. Then I go back and drill out the gaps between the holes.

    I meant to comment on this earlier but somehow forgot. I am like you, owned a mortising attachment but seldom used it. It seemed like such a hassle to set up all the time. Recently I had a project with 30 odd mortises, so dug out the attachment and set it up. I’m now a strong believer! The mortises are crisp, straight, perfectly located and need very little clean up if any to be glue ready. Bonus is the speed of cutting the mortises, way faster than drilling and trimming.

    That really is a great argument for me to get a drill press, although when all is said and done, using a router is crazy fast too – just hard to find a bit that goes deep enough for through mortises

    #623116
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    The way I cut my mortises is with my drill press. I do also have a mortiser, but I seldom use it. I measure and drill the two ends first, then drill holes along the mortise leaving a space between each one. Then I go back and drill out the gaps between the holes.

    I meant to comment on this earlier but somehow forgot. I am like you, owned a mortising attachment but seldom used it. It seemed like such a hassle to set up all the time. Recently I had a project with 30 odd mortises, so dug out the attachment and set it up. I’m now a strong believer! The mortises are crisp, straight, perfectly located and need very little clean up if any to be glue ready. Bonus is the speed of cutting the mortises, way faster than drilling and trimming.

    You mean you don’t just use a chisel and mallet?…lol.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #623117
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    The way I cut my mortises is with my drill press. I do also have a mortiser, but I seldom use it. I measure and drill the two ends first, then drill holes along the mortise leaving a space between each one. Then I go back and drill out the gaps between the holes.

    I meant to comment on this earlier but somehow forgot. I am like you, owned a mortising attachment but seldom used it. It seemed like such a hassle to set up all the time. Recently I had a project with 30 odd mortises, so dug out the attachment and set it up. I’m now a strong believer! The mortises are crisp, straight, perfectly located and need very little clean up if any to be glue ready. Bonus is the speed of cutting the mortises, way faster than drilling and trimming.

    That really is a great argument for me to get a drill press, although when all is said and done, using a router is crazy fast too – just hard to find a bit that goes deep enough for through mortises

    Yeah, now that I have found the technique, it makes mortises go so much faster and cleaner. I looked at the router option but just never got around to building the jig and doing it.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #623118

    The way I cut my mortises is with my drill press. I do also have a mortiser, but I seldom use it. I measure and drill the two ends first, then drill holes along the mortise leaving a space between each one. Then I go back and drill out the gaps between the holes.

    I meant to comment on this earlier but somehow forgot. I am like you, owned a mortising attachment but seldom used it. It seemed like such a hassle to set up all the time. Recently I had a project with 30 odd mortises, so dug out the attachment and set it up. I’m now a strong believer! The mortises are crisp, straight, perfectly located and need very little clean up if any to be glue ready. Bonus is the speed of cutting the mortises, way faster than drilling and trimming.

    You mean you don’t just use a chisel and mallet?…lol.

    I dont know about you guys, but for one or two, that’s exactly what I do. Fast enough and minimal setup time.
    Its when you want to make a slat backed chair and have 50 to do that you tool up

    #623213
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Well, I only had 8 mortises to do today but I set up the mortising attachment anyway. Finished all 8 and the corresponding tenons in a bit less than an hour.

    I also final milled and tapered the legs for my new project.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #623231

    Nice looking mortises there Peter. Having fun make sawdust I see. Did you pick up and try any of the Watco Danish Oil I suggested yet?

    #623237
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Nice looking mortises there Peter. Having fun make sawdust I see. Did you pick up and try any of the Watco Danish Oil I suggested yet?

    Thanks, Lon, yes I did. I have used it on some pine in a set of shelves. It goes on really well, dries evenly and gives a nice hard base for final finish. I think I will like using it so far.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #623277
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Well, I only had 8 mortises to do today but I set up the mortising attachment

    Fine looking mortises Peter. Nice that the mortise attachment allowed you to do 8 in an hour. That is pretty fast.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #623286
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Well, I only had 8 mortises to do today but I set up the mortising attachment anyway. Finished all 8 and the corresponding tenons in a bit less than an hour.

    I also final milled and tapered the legs for my new project.



    @SmallerStick
    , the tapered legs look great.
    Only 8 mortises? Can’t wait to see this one put all together.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #623293
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Well, I only had 8 mortises to do today but I set up the mortising attachment anyway. Finished all 8 and the corresponding tenons in a bit less than an hour.

    I also final milled and tapered the legs for my new project.

    @smallerstick, the tapered legs look great.
    Only 8 mortises? Can’t wait to see this one put all together.

    Should have it pretty much done by the weekend. I still have breadboard ends to do on the top and, of course, assembly and finish.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #623295

    Well, I only had 8 mortises to do today but I set up the mortising attachment anyway. Finished all 8 and the corresponding tenons in a bit less than an hour.

    I also final milled and tapered the legs for my new project.

    @smallerstick, the tapered legs look great.
    Only 8 mortises? Can’t wait to see this one put all together.

    Should have it pretty much done by the weekend. I still have breadboard ends to do on the top and, of course, assembly and finish.

    Great progress! Im jealous of the shop time- I never seem to have more than an evening every week or two, unless Im on a commission for a sold piece.

    #623390
    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Well, I only had 8 mortises to do today but I set up the mortising attachment anyway. Finished all 8 and the corresponding tenons in a bit less than an hour.

    I also final milled and tapered the legs for my new project.

    Wow those look really nice. I think maybe part of the problem is that my mortiser might be missing a part. I bought it off a guy on Craigslist. I was actually buying something else and he sorta threw it in for a steal. I’ll have to reinvestigate that tool in the future. Thanks for posting!

    #623484
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Well, I only had 8 mortises to do today but I set up the mortising attachment anyway. Finished all 8 and the corresponding tenons in a bit less than an hour.

    I also final milled and tapered the legs for my new project.

    Wow those look really nice. I think maybe part of the problem is that my mortiser might be missing a part. I bought it off a guy on Craigslist. I was actually buying something else and he sorta threw it in for a steal. I’ll have to reinvestigate that tool in the future. Thanks for posting!

    @MrFid Here’s a pic of the mortising setup if that will help you sort out the parts.

    I got the tenons trimmed and beveled and the dry fit done for the base today. Added the breadboard ends to the top and did a first sanding. Tomorrow will be sanding, glueup and maybe a bit of finishing.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #623495
    staker
    Pro

    Table looks great.

    #623496

    Looking good there Peter. I love how you tapered the legs. Are you rounding over or putting a profile on the top?

    #623502
    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    @mrfid Here’s a pic of the mortising setup if that will help you sort out the parts.

    Thanks! I have to take a closer look at mine. My mortiser is a separate machine from a drill press. It has it’s own motor and stand an everything. It’s a Delta 14-650. Yours looks great!

Viewing 20 posts - 541 through 560 (of 1,003 total)
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