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wood filler/ fairing

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  • #440478
    yellaD
    Pro

    So I was dressing my table top with a bench plane and I experienced some tear out in the Cherry’s tough swirly grain pattern vs. the straight maple portion. The table top is thin enough I really don’t want to keep planing to get rid of it. The rest of the top is cleaned up nicely and flat so it would make sense to stop here, but I don’t know how to fix my mistake in an adequate way. Considering it’s going to be a coffee table, I’m afraid it’s going to be a glaring mistake!! Any advice or recommends on products? Also a finish that works in conjuction with the fix…I’ve tried epoxy before but it doesn’t take finishes. I’ve tried glue mixed with saw dust and it doesn’t match well. I’ve used some store bought fill but have not tried it for “fairing”.
    Thanks in advance!

    #440514
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Have you considered a grain/pore filler? How bad is the tearout?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #440546
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Instead of a plane what about some wood scrapers ? That should really help. It should even it out with out any more tear out.

    #440562
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Instead of a plane what about some wood scrapers ? That should really help. It should even it out with out any more tear out.

    I would definitely go with a scraper to begin. They are amazing with difficult grain.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #440633
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Instead of a plane what about some wood scrapers ? That should really help. It should even it out with out any more tear out.

    I would definitely go with a scraper to begin. They are amazing with difficult grain.

    yah i find when I need something to smooth down i’d pick up a sharpened scraper. A nicely tuned scrapper is amazing, it takes just a little bit off and smooths the piece out perfectly. Mind you I’ve been looking for my scrapers and I can’t find them all. I don’t know how I lost them lol.

    #440658
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I couldn’t see the tear out in the picture.
    A trick I have done is to use Watco oil and sand it with a orbital sander and wet sandpaper while the oil is wet. It fills the grain and minor stuff very well. I’m not positive you can still buy it.
    It may also be hard with the different colors of wood you have.

    #440664
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Mind you I’ve been looking for my scrapers and I can’t find them all. I don’t know how I lost them lol.

    Hmm, can’t seem to find mine either… A scraper would be perfect for the odd grain you’ve described. I personally reach for my belt sander in instances like this as I haven’t really gotten good with a bench plane.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #440666
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I have been woodworking all my life and never mastered a hand plane.
    I mostly want tools with a on off switch. Belt sander would be a good way to avoid tear out. I know when I get tear out on boards going through the planer sometimes all I have to do is run the board through in the other direction. That may also work with a hand plane?

    #440673
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I have been woodworking all my life and never mastered a hand plane.
    I mostly want tools with a on off switch. Belt sander would be a good way to avoid tear out. I know when I get tear out on boards going through the planer sometimes all I have to do is run the board through in the other direction. That may also work with a hand plane?

    Good point, and conceptually it’s accurate. I’m thinking that if you reverse directions 180*, you might get tear on the Other piece though…I’ve always been told that using a plan on a skew is the best method, but I still prefer sanding when possible.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #440721
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    even planning on a tough grain is difficult and risky. Sanding can leave ripples due to hard and soft spots in the wood. a cabinet scraper is the best bet IMHO

    #440863
    yellaD
    Pro

    I have been woodworking all my life and never mastered a hand plane.
    I mostly want tools with a on off switch. Belt sander would be a good way to avoid tear out. I know when I get tear out on boards going through the planer sometimes all I have to do is run the board through in the other direction. That may also work with a hand plane?

    Good point, and conceptually it’s accurate. I’m thinking that if you reverse directions 180*, you might get tear on the Other piece though…I’ve always been told that using a plan on a skew is the best method, but I still prefer sanding when possible.

    Yes! I was working it in both directions as I discovered which areas flow which way. I totally should have started with a scaper, but now it’s too deep. I will take a pic later. Completely my fault though as the cut was a little heavy on my first pass when the blow out happened.

    #440895
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I have been woodworking all my life and never mastered a hand plane.
    I mostly want tools with a on off switch. Belt sander would be a good way to avoid tear out. I know when I get tear out on boards going through the planer sometimes all I have to do is run the board through in the other direction. That may also work with a hand plane?

    Good point, and conceptually it’s accurate. I’m thinking that if you reverse directions 180*, you might get tear on the Other piece though…I’ve always been told that using a plan on a skew is the best method, but I still prefer sanding when possible.

    Yes! I was working it in both directions as I discovered which areas flow which way. I totally should have started with a scaper, but now it’s too deep. I will take a pic later. Completely my fault though as the cut was a little heavy on my first pass when the blow out happened.

    I have found too that highly figured wood has grain going both directions. That’s when I will abandon the plane and switch to scrapers. Scrapers will tolerate wonky grain and give you a smooth finish.
    I’m told that low angle planes will help as will scraper planes but I don’t own either.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #440899
    yellaD
    Pro

    I have been woodworking all my life and never mastered a hand plane.
    I mostly want tools with a on off switch. Belt sander would be a good way to avoid tear out. I know when I get tear out on boards going through the planer sometimes all I have to do is run the board through in the other direction. That may also work with a hand plane?

    Good point, and conceptually it’s accurate. I’m thinking that if you reverse directions 180*, you might get tear on the Other piece though…I’ve always been told that using a plan on a skew is the best method, but I still prefer sanding when possible.

    Yes! I was working it in both directions as I discovered which areas flow which way. I totally should have started with a scaper, but now it’s too deep. I will take a pic later. Completely my fault though as the cut was a little heavy on my first pass when the blow out happened.

    I have found too that highly figured wood has grain going both directions. That’s when I will abandon the plane and switch to scrapers. Scrapers will tolerate wonky grain and give you a smooth finish.
    I’m told that low angle planes will help as will scraper planes but I don’t own either.

    I have a low angle block plane, but to be honest I was going to use it after using my smoother. I should have went block, and then smoother maybe…:) Next time.

    #441476
    yellaD
    Pro
    #441792
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/FcKDasioEaI?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    yah thats what i am talking about, i used my scrappers alot when I was building my bow. Practically the last half of the build was all scrappers.

    #442179
    yellaD
    Pro

    My attempt at scraping after trying my hand at burnishing it. I got better at it after trying it about 5 times. Still not perfect, but will eventually get the “feel”.

    #442294
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    looks interesting, how much smoother did it get? better than sand paper finish?

    #442544
    yellaD
    Pro

    looks interesting, how much smoother did it get? better than sand paper finish?

    It feels as smooth as a smoothing plane’s finish, at least my smoothing plane…:P
    The tricky grain areas came out so much better with the scraper vs plane. Thumbs up!

    #442841
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    looks interesting, how much smoother did it get? better than sand paper finish?

    It feels as smooth as a smoothing plane’s finish, at least my smoothing plane…:P
    The tricky grain areas came out so much better with the scraper vs plane. Thumbs up!

    so did you end up picking up the two set, the thicker one and the one you were using?

    #442848
    yellaD
    Pro

    looks interesting, how much smoother did it get? better than sand paper finish?

    It feels as smooth as a smoothing plane’s finish, at least my smoothing plane…:P
    The tricky grain areas came out so much better with the scraper vs plane. Thumbs up!

    so did you end up picking up the two set, the thicker one and the one you were using?

    I got us both Bahco ones, they are 0.8 mm and it was the one I was using in video. I bought kit that comes with curved and burnisher that is thinner at 0.6mm.

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