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Wire size?

Viewing 9 posts - 21 through 29 (of 29 total)
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  • #749274
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I actually wish I had run a third conduit to feed back to the house a 14 gauge line so I could switch on/off it’s exterior lights from the house.

    Why can’t you use the original 2″ conduit to run your three way travelers? With a 2″ you can fill over a hundred #14 THHN or THWN conductors even with derating due to long runs.

    My electrician had said that you shouldn’t run a separate wire in the same conduit of either the electrical line of the 6 gauge feed or the conduit comm lines. He gave me the logic behind it not being allowed per code, but I can’t recall what that was.

    The Canadian code must be different. Communication lines no do not mix them in the same. Service conductors cannot but feeder conductors and branch circuit conductors can be in the same raceway. In any case may be a wireless switch is even better.

    #749275
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I never knew there was such a bit for the hammer/drill. That sure takes all the fun out of using a sledge hammer to install a ground rod.

    Down here in Florida we have sandy soil, each blow of a sledge hammer sinks at least a foot down. That bit is going to slow things down, not to mention you have to get up higher on the ladder to use a rotary hammer.

    #749288
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    I never knew there was such a bit for the hammer/drill. That sure takes all the fun out of using a sledge hammer to install a ground rod.

    Down here in Florida we have sandy soil, each blow of a sledge hammer sinks at least a foot down. That bit is going to slow things down, not to mention you have to get up higher on the ladder to use a rotary hammer.

    Yea not much help for you in Fl. But us with clay or rock the rotary hammer is a back saver.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #749291
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I never knew there was such a bit for the hammer/drill. That sure takes all the fun out of using a sledge hammer to install a ground rod.

    Down here in Florida we have sandy soil, each blow of a sledge hammer sinks at least a foot down. That bit is going to slow things down, not to mention you have to get up higher on the ladder to use a rotary hammer.

    Yea not much help for you in Fl. But us with clay or rock the rotary hammer is a back saver.

    Here’s it’s clay. Tons of it. We basically sit on what was an ancient lake bed. Little shale, but lots of errant granite type rocks buried from the last ice age also.

    They’ve been installing a new water main on my street this summer and the trench is like 8-10 feet down. I was talking to the guys one day and they said the nice thing about all the clay is there is virtually no risk of cave ins around here.

    #749296
    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    I never knew there was such a bit for the hammer/drill. That sure takes all the fun out of using a sledge hammer to install a ground rod.

    Down here in Florida we have sandy soil, each blow of a sledge hammer sinks at least a foot down. That bit is going to slow things down, not to mention you have to get up higher on the ladder to use a rotary hammer.

    Yea not much help for you in Fl. But us with clay or rock the rotary hammer is a back saver.

    Here’s it’s clay. Tons of it. We basically sit on what was an ancient lake bed. Little shale, but lots of errant granite type rocks buried from the last ice age also.

    They’ve been installing a new water main on my street this summer and the trench is like 8-10 feet down. I was talking to the guys one day and they said the nice thing about all the clay is there is virtually no risk of cave ins around here.

    We have clay here also. I would say lots of it. We have alot of limestone & granite here. When they did the street near me they had break rock to get the water & sewer lines lower.
    There is quarry about 3 miles west of me that crushes and colors rock for shingles. There is also another just north of town that has several quarries.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #749300
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I never knew there was such a bit for the hammer/drill. That sure takes all the fun out of using a sledge hammer to install a ground rod.

    Down here in Florida we have sandy soil, each blow of a sledge hammer sinks at least a foot down. That bit is going to slow things down, not to mention you have to get up higher on the ladder to use a rotary hammer.

    Yea not much help for you in Fl. But us with clay or rock the rotary hammer is a back saver.

    Here’s it’s clay. Tons of it. We basically sit on what was an ancient lake bed. Little shale, but lots of errant granite type rocks buried from the last ice age also.

    They’ve been installing a new water main on my street this summer and the trench is like 8-10 feet down. I was talking to the guys one day and they said the nice thing about all the clay is there is virtually no risk of cave ins around here.

    How long does it take to drain all the water via ground infiltration after a heavy rainfall? Clay doesn’t drain as fast as sand I don’t think.

    #749314
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I never knew there was such a bit for the hammer/drill. That sure takes all the fun out of using a sledge hammer to install a ground rod.

    Down here in Florida we have sandy soil, each blow of a sledge hammer sinks at least a foot down. That bit is going to slow things down, not to mention you have to get up higher on the ladder to use a rotary hammer.

    Yea not much help for you in Fl. But us with clay or rock the rotary hammer is a back saver.

    Here’s it’s clay. Tons of it. We basically sit on what was an ancient lake bed. Little shale, but lots of errant granite type rocks buried from the last ice age also.

    They’ve been installing a new water main on my street this summer and the trench is like 8-10 feet down. I was talking to the guys one day and they said the nice thing about all the clay is there is virtually no risk of cave ins around here.

    How long does it take to drain all the water via ground infiltration after a heavy rainfall? Clay doesn’t drain as fast as sand I don’t think.

    You have to really make sure about proper sloping perimeter drainage around houses here. Leaky basements are common here, and most of them are due to poor backfilling after construction, or HOs doing things that change the drainage away from their houses.

    I know when I was getting a permit for my shed they kept on telling me that you have to make sure you keep all the existing sloping on the property, not just near the house, but everywhere. Same when I got the permit for our above ground pool.

    In other words, if you have excess dirt with what you are doing, don’t just plunk it down anywhere and toss in some grass seed to get rid of it. All sorts of rules exist also to not impact neighbors with terrain changes to one’s yard or that will cause water to migrate onto neighbors properties with gutter drains and such.

    #749403
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I think it’s pretty much the same everywhere.

    Down here the water drains pretty fast via infiltration. However the problem is we are flat in Florida. There isn’t any steep slope anywhere. Most new development prohibits water running off from your property to the streets or neighbors. So if you want to put in a concrete driveway out front, good luck. Because that concrete driveway reduces the area of porous surface for drainage. My city requires a minimum of 25% porous and landscaped surface on a building lot. So if you have a lot, and half of that lot is occupied by the house, you are down to 25% of non-porous. If you want a patio, pool, concrete driveway, deck, whatever, you have to work within that number. We don’t have basements here either, the water table is only about 30″ below grade LOL. Lots of Florida especially down south used to be swamps, do even though we don’t have clay, we have muck layers. Back in the days when they build roads, they just dig two deep ditches on the sides and use the cut to build up the fill for the roadbed.

    #749406
    Doobie
    Moderator

    OK, I just realized this thread is about Wire Size. How the heck did we get talking about all this other stuff, Lol!

    Man, we’re bad sometimes. Think we went off course talking about buried conduit.

Viewing 9 posts - 21 through 29 (of 29 total)
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