dcsimg

Winterize?

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 213 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #403372
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    It sounds like we have the same set up, Mine’s an attached 13′ x 26′ Xgarage/shop. I finished it off years ago.

    As said above insulate and drywall with a nice insulated door, I also added many electrical outlets along the walls but also in the ceiling, some for lighting, door opener etc, Another thing I did when dry-walling the ceiling was install one of those folding ladder hatches for attic access. Then laid down a plywood floor up there for an extra storage room, I have two heaters. Both 220v, One hangs in the corner from the ceiling and the other is one of those built-in the wall space heater types. It can be -20 outside and still nice and warm in there.

    I also installed a hoist above the ceiling in the attic, Here’s a thread on it. Good luck http://bethepro.com/forums/topic/overhead-hoist-install/

    #403400
    yellaD
    Pro

    Hey thanks for the responses fellas! I do plan on getting a sparky friend in to add a separate breaker panel/ add 220v outlet. I did consider “doing it right” at that point but wasn’t sure if I could cheap out. I’ve seen people put up what looks like styrofoam insulation to the back of their garage door, and I thought that would work (http://www.insulationandairconditioning.com.au/Garage_door_insulation_2012/Garage_door_insulation_noosa.jpg)

    So far, it’s apparent that I need to use the highest rated Roxul that will fit my 2×4 studs. I’m gonna take pics and post them, don’t laugh lol 😉

    #403403
    yellaD
    Pro

    I have a typical detached house where the garage faces the front so two sides face the elements. Whateve I do to this garage has to be “reversible” or able to use as an actual garage for car again at some point, so I can’t go all out. I had a plan to use french cleat system for storage and hanging solution.

    #403409
    yellaD
    Pro

    My house is natural gas. Did you run your your system under the concrete? What you’re saying about the cost of heating is another thing that’s on my mind. Right now I have nothing.

    #403410
    yellaD
    Pro

    @timeless quality, that’s a great suggestion. Our bedroom is directly above the garage and it’s freezing in the winter and cold in the summer. We just moved into this house coming on 2yrs ago and that’s definetly something we need to do! Even the woman will be on board with that!!!

    #403411
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I have a typical detached house where the garage faces the front so two sides face the elements. Whateve I do to this garage has to be “reversible” or able to use as an actual garage for car again at some point, so I can’t go all out. I had a plan to use french cleat system for storage and hanging solution.

    Wait a minute, Not sure I understand now. Don’t you mean it’s an ‘attached’ garage? …..Btw, I like the high ceiling. Wish mine was higher like that

    #403414
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    @timeless quality, that’s a great suggestion. Our bedroom is directly above the garage and it’s freezing in the winter and cold in the summer. We just moved into this house coming on 2yrs ago and that’s definetly something we need to do! Even the woman will be on board with that!!!

    The best solution for that is to rip down what you have on the ceiling and put spray foam. This will act as a vapour barrier and insulator. This way in the future that bedroom above will be warm in the winter and if you decide to park a car in the garage, the fumes will not permeate up into the room.

    If that’s not feasible then you still need to make sure that ceiling is air tight. The vapour barrier has to be applied first then insulation, then your 5/8″ fire rated drywall.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #403417

    @timeless quality, that’s a great suggestion. Our bedroom is directly above the garage and it’s freezing in the winter and cold in the summer. We just moved into this house coming on 2yrs ago and that’s definetly something we need to do! Even the woman will be on board with that!!!

    The best solution for that is to rip down what you have on the ceiling and put spray foam. This will act as a vapour barrier and insulator. This way in the future that bedroom above will be warm in the winter and if you decide to park a car in the garage, the fumes will not permeate up into the room.

    If that’s not feasible then you still need to make sure that ceiling is air tight. The vapour barrier has to be applied first then insulation, then your 5/8″ fire rated drywall.

    How hard is it to spray foam yourself? I may want to do that with my basement when I gut it, but its so small Id end up paying whomever the minimum just to show up.

    Is it a DIY type job, or it it best left to the pros? (In this case, I dont mean DIY by average homeowner – just DIY by someone already working the trades)

    #403418
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    I have a typical detached house where the garage faces the front so two sides face the elements. Whateve I do to this garage has to be “reversible” or able to use as an actual garage for car again at some point, so I can’t go all out. I had a plan to use french cleat system for storage and hanging solution.

    Wait a minute, Not sure I understand now. Don’t you mean it’s an ‘attached’ garage? …..Btw, I like the high ceiling. Wish mine was higher like that

    @Dabbs,
    That’s where the front of the garage sticks out past the entrance. Thus part of the side wall and rear of the garage is attached the other two are exterior walls.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #403419
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    @timeless quality, that’s a great suggestion. Our bedroom is directly above the garage and it’s freezing in the winter and cold in the summer. We just moved into this house coming on 2yrs ago and that’s definetly something we need to do! Even the woman will be on board with that!!!

    The best solution for that is to rip down what you have on the ceiling and put spray foam. This will act as a vapour barrier and insulator. This way in the future that bedroom above will be warm in the winter and if you decide to park a car in the garage, the fumes will not permeate up into the room.

    If that’s not feasible then you still need to make sure that ceiling is air tight. The vapour barrier has to be applied first then insulation, then your 5/8″ fire rated drywall.

    How hard is it to spray foam yourself? I may want to do that with my basement when I gut it, but its so small Id end up paying whomever the minimum just to show up.

    Is it a DIY type job, or it it best left to the pros? (In this case, I dont mean DIY by average homeowner – just DIY by someone already working the trades)

    Not hard at all, I have not done it but do know others that have.
    You can but or rent the necessary equipment from the big box stores at a fraction of the cost of a pro.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #403420
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    I have had, and do have, an uninsulated work space. I am working on that though. One thing you want to do, if it has to stay the way it is now, is to put a good coat of wax on all exposed metal. Table saw top, planer beds, the whole works. You will want to keep an eye on it too over the winter. When it is really cold out you don’t need to worry as much, but once you get around the freezing mark and above is when the moisture forms on things. I would not recommend putting a tarp over anything, it seems to create a humid zone around the tool, and you don’t want that. You can give motors and things like that a blast of WD-40 (the WD stands for Water Displacer btw). Just don’t fire them up right after as it is flammable. I usually do a routine of cleaning and waxing everything in the fall and spring (except this one as I was busy building the new shop and everything really suffered during that time from being in a canvass shelter all spring and summer).

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #403431
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I have a typical detached house where the garage faces the front so two sides face the elements. Whateve I do to this garage has to be “reversible” or able to use as an actual garage for car again at some point, so I can’t go all out. I had a plan to use french cleat system for storage and hanging solution.

    Wait a minute, Not sure I understand now. Don’t you mean it’s an ‘attached’ garage? …..Btw, I like the high ceiling. Wish mine was higher like that

    @Dabbs,
    That’s where the front of the garage sticks out past the entrance. Thus part of the side wall and rear of the garage is attached the other two are exterior walls.

    Ok, I see in another post he said there’s a bedroom above the garage too so I figure it is somewhat attached. Thanks 🙂

    #403457
    yellaD
    Pro

    @jimdaddyo, yes I totally agree about rust prevention with something. I read jojba oil, WD-40 is ok, maybe carnauba oil. The little disk emitters and lining are also in play if I build my cabinets in time.

    #403477
    yellaD
    Pro

    @dabbs, @58chev,
    yes it’s a fully detached house with an attached garage. I love the sound of spray foam, I’ll have to weigh the costs.
    So far I need to:
    1) Insulate the ceiling with foam or Roxul, then vapor barrier, then 5/8″ FR drywall
    2) Roxul behind walls, most likely drywall again
    3) buy an insulated garage door, still hoping there’s a DIY version of this
    4) electrical panel
    5) a 220V heater, seems unanimous a 110 won’t suffice.
    Did I miss anything?

    #403490
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    @dabbs, @58chev,
    yes it’s a fully detached house with an attached garage. I love the sound of spray foam, I’ll have to weigh the costs.
    So far I need to:
    1) Insulate the ceiling with foam or Roxul, then vapor barrier, then 5/8″ FR drywall
    2) Roxul behind walls, most likely drywall again
    3) buy an insulated garage door, still hoping there’s a DIY version of this
    4) electrical panel
    5) a 220V heater, seems unanimous a 110 won’t suffice.
    Did I miss anything?



    @yellaD
    ,
    No. 1, if you go with insulation batts, the vapour barrier goes on the warm side. It would be put first then the batts then the drywall.

    For your electrical panel get your heater first so you will know what AMP breaker to get.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #403496
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    simply adding vapor barrier to the walls and ceiling will keep heat in for the time being until you can fully insulate.. youd be surprised how well becasue that alone will stop air leakage

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #403520
    yellaD
    Pro

    All good suggestions, I’m going to do a rough estimate of materials cost and see what I can do now. Assuming I get everything from a big box store, let’s see how much this puppy will cost…I’ll keep you guys posted.

    #403538
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    simply adding vapor barrier to the walls and ceiling will keep heat in for the time being until you can fully insulate.. youd be surprised how well becasue that alone will stop air leakage

    That’s a good point. I’d rather have a seamless vapor barrier than insulation and no vapor barrier…if I had to pick just one.

    Air leakage is really a big thing when it comes to comfort. Make sure you are sealed up properly!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #403541
    yellaD
    Pro

    Price list for garage approx 23’x14’x10′
    = ceiling 322sqft, walls 704sqft (1026 sqft total):

    Roxul attic ins. 2×4″ R14 = $225 (low end)
    https://www.lowes.ca/insulation-batts-rolls/roxul-r14-comfortbatttrade-stone-wool-thermal-home-insulation-batts_g1363309.html?searchTerm=roxul-insulation-for-attics
    Roxul 2X6″ R24 = $580 (high end)
    https://www.lowes.ca/insulation-batts-rolls/roxul-r24-comfortbatttrade-stone-wool-thermal-home-insulation-batts_g1363130.html?searchTerm=roxul-insulation-for-attics

    Certainteed Membrane air and vapor barrier 800 sqft = $179 (low end)
    https://www.lowes.ca/radiant-barrier/certainteed-membraintrade-8-ft-x-100-ft-vapour-amp-air-barrier-film_g1568192.html
    Reflectix R21 unfaced reflective roll ins. 1000sqft = $400 (high end)
    https://www.lowes.ca/radiant-barrier/reflectix-r21-48-in-x-125-ft-unfaced-reflective-roll-insulation_g1335677.html

    Insulation for walls:
    Roxul R14 = $700
    https://www.lowes.ca/insulation-batts-rolls/roxul-r14-comfortbatttrade-stone-wool-thermal-home-insulation-batts_g1363309.html?searchTerm=insulation-r30

    drywall:
    5/8″ drywall (1100 sqft) = $520
    https://www.lowes.ca/drywall-boards/gold-bond-58-in-x-4-ft-x-8-ft-drywall_g1310163.html

    consumables $250

    Total (low end) $1874
    (high end) $2451

    *not incl. taxes, delivery or labour

    Does this sound reasonable? I have not included the garage door nor the electrical work because I hope to get “free” skilled labour and hoping to DIY door.

    #403563
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Recheck your insulation batts, most construction is 16″ not 24″. This will change your pricing. https://www.lowes.ca/insulation-batts-rolls/roxul-415001-16-in-x-48-in-comfortbatt-r14-wood-stud-insulation_g1590510.html

    6mil vapour barrier is what you need for your walls and ceiling. No need for the fancy stuff you linked to. http://www.homedepot.ca/product/super-six-cgsb-approved-vapour-barrier/959948

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 213 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 0.635 seconds