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Winterize?

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  • #403102
    yellaD
    Pro

    How do I “winterize” my garage on a budget? I have a one car garage that i use as my woodworking shop, and this will be my first winter with it as a workshop (and not an actual garage) I’m pretty sure it’s going to be FREEZING in Oshawa, Ont. so I’m just wondering what u guys have done to make your garage usable? I have and entry connected to house.

    #403106
    monman1
    Pro

    Insulate it if its not already.

    Member since April 4, 2014

    doer of all , master of none.

    #403107
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Is the garage door insulated? How about the ceiling and walls?

    Doors are generally insulated here, but its not uncommon for the walls and ceiling to be skipped over. As long as the wall between the house and garage is insulated, most people will never miss the exterior wall insulation.

    My garage is in its first year as a work shop as well. I’ll likely buy a small heater to hang from the ceiling if I come across one.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #403121
    yellaD
    Pro

    Sorry I forgot to mention that I do not have any insulation in the garage at all presently, only what @jponto07 said. I guess my question is what is the bare minimum I should do? I’ve got a mini heater, but that won’t be enough, working in gloves and coat sucks!

    #403178
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Yah it is time to insulate everything. what does your garage door look like, you will probably have to insulate the door first and seal the edges. Is the garage separate from the building, how many walls are facing the outside?

    #403202
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    First step is to insulate the walls, and ceiling. If the garage door is not insulated then you will have to replace it with an insulted one. Go for the max R factor that will fit your studs and ceiling joists. As far a heater goes natural gas is the most efficient.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #403215
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Another from The Dirty SHWA. LOL

    Minimum I would do is 2×4 stud, using ROXUL Insulation and NOT Pink. If you can afford to loose a bit of space, 2×6 studs will give you a better R rating with the proper insulating bats.

    As the others have mentioned exterior walls and ceiling should be done along with an insulated garage door.

    You would still need a small heater to make it comfortable enough to work inside.

    EDIT:: Unfortunately not an easy task to insulate on a budget.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #403218
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    It sounds like the walls are drywalled… Making this process more expensive and time consuming to complete.

    Consider pulling the board down and doing the job right. Take the time to add any electrical that you might need at that time as it will be much easier.

    As for HOW far to go…I can’t advise a specific R value for your area, but Roxul will be better than fiberglass for the walls. Use rigid foam panels for the door/replace it with insulated panels. Code for attic insulation is r-38 here. Im inclined to think it’s higher whee you live.

    You’ve got some work to do @yellaD!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #403220
    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    You should put a tube heater in there.

    #403252
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    You should put a tube heater in there.

    I’d suggest a similar version that hangs from the ceiling. You see them a lot in warehouses. It’s basically a furnace without the duct work…it just blows from a single location.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #403260

    Depending on your budget,
    Like 58Chev mentioned no pink, use roxul, if and I assume your walls are 2×4 use the roxul for that, you can do two different things, add onto the studs to create a deeper space to accommodate for insulation for 2×6 walls, or stick with the 2×4 and use the roxul for that size, then you can add a foam board with the vapor barrier, then put plywood over that attached to the studs, this way you have a solid surface for hanging tools and stuff off the plywood. , all depending on budget of course.

    #403263

    I would run a separate circuit for the heater. You may even want to look at 220v heaters. Also, before you insulate make sure you have the number of outlets you want for your tools.

    #403270
    TimelessQuality
    Pro
    Central America, (Kansas)

    If the budget is tight, the ceiling should probably be insulated first, as that’s where heat loss is the greatest

    --Steve

    #403271
    TimelessQuality
    Pro
    Central America, (Kansas)

    Do you still park a car in it? I have a really tight garage, and if I pull the truck in, the engine heat will keep it from freezing in there

    --Steve

    #403296
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I would run a separate circuit for the heater. You may even want to look at 220v heaters. Also, before you insulate make sure you have the number of outlets you want for your tools.

    Any kind of 110V heater is really just a big hair dryer. 220V is a bit better if the place is insulated and not too big.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #403322
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Show some pics so we can actually see what you’re dealing with.

    #403330

    Attached or detached? Is there “house” above the garage?

    The garage door is a huge heat-sink unless you wrap it. For the rest, what is your heating system?

    My garage is not insulated, but I have a hot water system that runs through the garage as its last leg back to the boiler. Ive found heating the garage makes very little difference in my bill (possibly none at all) as the water is running that way anyways and opening the valve to the garage radiator changes nothing. Water still about the same temp when it gets back to the boiler – within a degree or so

    So, my garage is almost too hot, yet no insulation. Im just heating the outside (not kidding, the first foot or two of driveway stay clear all winter)

    An electric baseboard might make a difference in cost though

    #403337
    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    I turned a 320 sq ft room in my house into a shop for the winter months .That way I don’t have to worry about heating up my regular shop during the winter months 🙂

    #403340
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I winterized my attached one car garage. It has an old uninsulated metal swing up door that I managed to insulate at little to no cost using styrofoam and old rec room panelling I had lying around.

    The exterior and interior walls and ceiling were already insulate inside. The floor I built up and placed Platon/Dimplex and Reflectofoil underneath. Diverted some HVAC lines to feed the garage and created a cold air return as well into the adjacent room. Worked out great.

    #403368
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Andy,
    The 220V heater is on sale this week at Canadian Tire.

    Even though I have 2×6 insulated walls, an insulated garage door and man door, a heated slab that I keep at only 10* in the winter (detached garage). I still hook up my 220V construction heater while I’m in there, it keeps the air at a manageable temp for working in.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

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