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White Glue Applicators

  • This topic has 23 replies, 20 voices, and was last updated 5 years ago by r-ice.
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  • #475949
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    I recently picked up 2 of the glubots and they work great for dispensing the correct amount of glue. However you still need to spread the glue to the surface , I find using another piece of wood doesn’t work so well. I’ve used rollers which do an okay job but the best is Brushes, right now I am using a HDX brush i happen to have on hand, but was wondering what everyone else uses? do you just grab a regular paintbrush or are there glue specific brushes to use?

    #475952
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I use my finger. A little glue won’t hurt you. I keep a damp rag by to clean my finger and wipe any squeeze out glue.

    #475964
    svensshutters
    Pro
    Colorado Springs, CO

    I have a brush that I picked up a while back. It was cheap, looks like one of those rubber basting brushes. Once the glue dries, it comes right off and for the cost, I have no complaints. I think it cost a dollar or something cheap like that.

    #475974
    lulu
    Pro

    Purdy brushs. they are a little expensive but worth the money.

    Trifles make perfection, but perfection is no trifle.
    Michael Angelo

    #475980
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Purdy brushs. they are a little expensive but worth the money.

    You’re kidding right…why would you resort to a relatively expensive paint brush to spread glue?

    I use a silicone brush from Rockler. Just let the glue dry and pull it off the next day. PVA glue doesn’t adhere to silicone, so it just falls right off. If the work piece is larger, I’ll use a silicone J-roller that’s meant for rolling laminates or peel and stick flashing.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

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    #476002
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Purdy brushs. they are a little expensive but worth the money.

    You’re kidding right…why would you resort to a relatively expensive paint brush to spread glue?

    I use a silicone brush from Rockler. Just let the glue dry and pull it off the next day. PVA glue doesn’t adhere to silicone, so it just falls right off. If the work piece is larger, I’ll use a silicone J-roller that’s meant for rolling laminates or peel and stick flashing.

    I wonder if i can find one of these here in Canada, or i’ll just have to make a larger order from rockler since they started to ship to Canadians. I think i’ve seen that type of brush in a bbq store.

    #476018
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    As long as it’s silicone, you’ll be fine. Sven mentioned a basting brush which is essentially the same. It’s definitely a big help when properly spreading glue.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #476037
    kzcarp
    Pro

    I was about to suggest a silicone kitchen spatula. Or spoonula. Or those plastic schmears, those are cheap enough to buy a bunch and toss when they get cakes with glue.

    kevin

    #476064
    DesertDeuces
    Pro
    Indio, CA

    I just use a paper towel. If the area is large, I’ll place a couple of thicknesses of paper towel on a putty knife. Then, the only thing that gets glue on it is what I would have used anyway to clean up. The nice thing is there’s nothing else to clean up.

    Pat

    #476065
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    its not a applicator but since its on the topic of glue.. do you guys know where you can get those odd shaped gooseneck glue bottles. lee valley was selling them here but seem to have stopped. i cant remember if busy bee had them or is it a fastcap product

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #476073
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    I use my finger. A little glue won’t hurt you. I keep a damp rag by to clean my finger and wipe any squeeze out glue.

    I’m with you Ron. My finger does just fine. Can’t tell you how much glue I have pealed off my fingers after it has dried.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #476086
    redwood
    Pro

    its not a applicator but since its on the topic of glue.. do you guys know where you can get those odd shaped gooseneck glue bottles. lee valley was selling them here but seem to have stopped. i cant remember if busy bee had them or is it a fastcap product

    If it is what I’m thinking, it is a fastcap product, but is available from a number of sources including Amazon

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=gluebot

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #476090
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I use my finger. A little glue won’t hurt you. I keep a damp rag by to clean my finger and wipe any squeeze out glue.

    I’m with you Ron. My finger does just fine. Can’t tell you how much glue I have pealed off my fingers after it has dried.

    I’m in the finger club too.

    #476114

    I use those Rockler silicone brushes but when needed the finger dives right in. I prefer brushing it out versus the finger because you often wind up getting glue where you don’t want it while handling the pieces. Cleanup is so easy as previously mentioned with those silicone brushes.

    #476118
    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    Ive always used my finger but just recently started using flux brushes, find they work pretty good.

    #476129

    its not a applicator but since its on the topic of glue.. do you guys know where you can get those odd shaped gooseneck glue bottles. lee valley was selling them here but seem to have stopped. i cant remember if busy bee had them or is it a fastcap product

    If it is what I’m thinking, it is a fastcap product, but is available from a number of sources including Amazon

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=gluebot

    Those glue setups seem to be all the rage now . That’s all I see guys using for daily glueing .

    Always willing to learn .

    #476259
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    its not a applicator but since its on the topic of glue.. do you guys know where you can get those odd shaped gooseneck glue bottles. lee valley was selling them here but seem to have stopped. i cant remember if busy bee had them or is it a fastcap product

    yah for us Canadians you really only have two places to get it, rockler or elitetools.ca and I bought mine at elitetools.ca and it was shipped and recieved in two days. It is worth it, as i have one bottle filled with titebond 3 and one with titebond 1.

    I use my finger. A little glue won’t hurt you. I keep a damp rag by to clean my finger and wipe any squeeze out glue.

    lol i use my finger when i don’t have anything else but it gets to be a bit annoying if i have a larger area to cover or multiple larger areas to cover. Thats why i picked up the random brush in my shop, i just have to run hot water on it afterwards to clean it up.

    #476272
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I use disposable acid brushes to spread glue. They come in 1/4″ 1/2″ and 3/4″ sizes. I can get a box of 250 for $5 at the flea market.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #476319
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I’ll second the flux brush for smaller jobs.
    An old credit card or a plastic spatula works well for larger jobs, too.
    I’ve seen foam rollers used but never tried that myself.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #476410
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    I ‘learned’ using acid brushes – the kind you spread flux with.

    They work, but so does a finger.

    Syringes work really well, too, if you have a source – you can have a couple dilutions made up and they keep for weeks. The ones with Luer Lock fittings will take 1/8″ Tygon tubing (with fittings) that is great for getting in tight places. They can be flushed out when done.

    The tough part is finding a source of them. The ones that held saline for flushing IV tubing are your best bet – they never touched body fluids, 10 mL is a typical size, they only held salt water, and there’s no needle. There are antibiotics and anticoagulants that also are for IV use that are the same.

    Buddy up with a nurse that can keep some out of the sharps container.

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