dcsimg

When is it ever OK to tile on sheetrock ?

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 32 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #491612
    kzcarp
    Pro

    I have never thought it was OK. But I’m seeing (tearing out) a lot of it recently. Not in bad shape but it begs the question why am I killing myself with cement board, if this is holding up ok?

    kevin

    #491614

    You talking greenboard and blueboard? Direct water contact?

    Ive seen 30 year old tile directly on sheetrock, with no sign of infiltration when it got ripped out. Ive also seen it soggy and rotting out in a year. Putting in the right products means you dont have to roll the dice and hope for the best

    #491615
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    It will hold up for the bathroom parts where there isn’t no water contact. And has to be green board otherwise it will hold mold behind it. And def can’t use in the shower part doesn’t matter what color it is cement board will hold water and won be damage when it gets wet but sheetrock will

    #491617
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    When is it okay…a kitchen backsplash maybe? Or an area that doesn’t have water exposure.

    I just tore out a fireplace surround today that was tiled with 16″ travertine directly over 1/2″ drywall. Obviously a fireplace is about the last place in a home you’d expect to find water, so this might be another acceptable location. BUT in this case, 16″ travertine is probably too heavy for 1/2″ board.

    I replaced the drywall the came off with the tile with 1/2″ Durock.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #491623
    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    Its fine in non wet areas like a backsplash. I believe you can install kerdi directly over drywall in a shower too though.

    #491625

    I’ve tiled many time over Sheetrock just not in showers and exterior surfaces . It’s very common in builders homes .

    Always willing to learn .

    #491627
    kzcarp
    Pro

    I believe you can install kerdi directly over drywall in a shower too though.

    I saw that at the schluter demonstration at JLC, but that still gives me the willy’s.
    I think I’ll just keep on with the cement board and sleep a bit better at night, there’s enough other stuff that I can’t control that keeps me up.

    kevin

    #491628
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    I have never seen tile not go over sheetrock unless it was a shower, except maybe a bathroom tile wainscot. Although I have seen plenty of wainscot over sheetrock.

    #491629
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    I will tile over sheetrock for a backsplash but that is about it.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #491632
    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    I believe you can install kerdi directly over drywall in a shower too though.

    I saw that at the schluter demonstration at JLC, but that still gives me the willy’s.
    I think I’ll just keep on with the cement board and sleep a bit better at night, there’s enough other stuff that I can’t control that keeps me up.

    kevin

    Yeah, i think I would have a hard time talking myself into doing that as well. Maybe with paperless drywall…

    Since I got a fiber cement blade for my track saw I really don’t mind cutting fiber cement any more either.

    #491633

    I will tile over sheetrock for a backsplash but that is about it.

    What about restaurant tile boards . The ones that go up 36″ to protect walls from damage.

    Always willing to learn .

    #491656
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    in bathrooms we use dense shield in the showers and directly around tubs.. it extends 16″ past them so water doesnt get into the drywall. beyond that its regular drywall..

    around fireplaces we use concrete board, the only time we use normal drywall behind tile is in kitchens

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #491664
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    I will tile over sheetrock for a backsplash but that is about it.

    What about restaurant tile boards . The ones that go up 36″ to protect walls from damage.

    I don’t know…the walls in some restaurants can take a beating over time…sheetrock would work but I would feel better with Hardie behind it.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #491665
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    In a lot of commercial applications such as bathroom wainscot, we see water resistant spelled out a lot. It is also fairly common on kitchen backsplashes as stated previously.

    Schluter Kerdi, claims you can use regular drywall in showers if you cover it with the Kerdi membrane prior to tile. You have to use their whole shower system however. Here is a video of using the system over drywall.

    #491668
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Since I got a fiber cement blade for my track saw I really don’t mind cutting fiber cement any more either.

    Any issues with the dust messing up your saw? I nearly bought a fiber blade for my beloved Makita today, but I couldn’t find a 6 1/2″ blade. Obviously the track saw has dust collection that my cordless doesn’t…

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #491671
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Since I got a fiber cement blade for my track saw I really don’t mind cutting fiber cement any more either.

    Any issues with the dust messing up your saw? I nearly bought a fiber blade for my beloved Makita today, but I couldn’t find a 6 1/2″ blade. Obviously the track saw has dust collection that my cordless doesn’t…

    the snapper shear is really the way to go for cutting fiber cement. no dust and much quieter than a circular saw.

    Attachments:
    #491693
    Clev08
    Pro

    Since I got a fiber cement blade for my track saw I really don’t mind cutting fiber cement any more either.

    Any issues with the dust messing up your saw? I nearly bought a fiber blade for my beloved Makita today, but I couldn’t find a 6 1/2″ blade. Obviously the track saw has dust collection that my cordless doesn’t…

    the snapper shear is really the way to go for cutting fiber cement. no dust and much quieter than a circular saw.

    I’ve never hear of that before, but if it means less dust when cutting hardie board sign me up!

    #491738
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Backsplash or some sort of wainscoting, would be the only time to use tile over sheetrock

    Since I got a fiber cement blade for my track saw I really don’t mind cutting fiber cement any more either.

    Any issues with the dust messing up your saw? I nearly bought a fiber blade for my beloved Makita today, but I couldn’t find a 6 1/2″ blade. Obviously the track saw has dust collection that my cordless doesn’t…

    I’m not sure I’d use a saw to to cut cement board, eventually the dust from it will kill the saw.
    I pull out the 4-1/2″ grinder with a diamond blade.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #491767
    aa_custom
    Pro
    PIttsburgh, PA

    Backsplash or some sort of wainscoting, would be the only time to use tile over sheetrock

    Since I got a fiber cement blade for my track saw I really don’t mind cutting fiber cement any more either.

    Any issues with the dust messing up your saw? I nearly bought a fiber blade for my beloved Makita today, but I couldn’t find a 6 1/2″ blade. Obviously the track saw has dust collection that my cordless doesn’t…

    I’m not sure I’d use a saw to to cut cement board, eventually the dust from it will kill the saw.
    I pull out the 4-1/2″ grinder with a diamond blade.

    I use this blade http://www.festoolproducts.com/CMT-236-160-04H-Fiber-Cement-Blade-for-TS-55-Track-p/236.160.04h.htm

    I use it on my ts-55. It works great. Vac catches damn near all the dust. I should probably pop open the blade cover to check it out at some point. It’s faster and cleaner than the shears I think. The shears can leave a bit of a ragged edge which I dont like, and you get a big pile of shavings on the ground. I could set up inside and cut all day and have next to no dust with my track saw setup.

    On my siding project I used my 1400 router with a carbide burr bit to cut the arches out of fiber cement panels. Here are some clips to show the dust collection in action

    these are the bits I used. http://www.amazon.com/CMT-84211-Contractor-Fiberglass-Diameter/dp/B00DUQ8MGK

    #491783
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    I still have not picked up that blade for the Festool. Guy gang cut drywall with it too. Why so much?

    Non wet areas drywall is fine but really should be primed first.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 32 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 0.289 seconds