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What's your sharpening regiment?

This topic contains 26 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by  smallerstick 2 hours, 41 minutes ago.

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  • #667017

    When it comes time to sharpen your chisel or other tools, what is your step by step process and what brands of stones, sandpaper, or other sharpening systems do you use?

    Bonus question: I was told never to oil my chisels because the oil will get in the wood I’m working on. Well while that does make sense, metal rusts really easily in Hawaii and if time and care is spent sharpening chisels I don’t want it to be ruined by rust. So I’m thinking I’ll rub them with oil when their gonna be out of use for a while and clean them with dish detergent to cut the oil before using them. Any other solutions or improvements to my basic idea?

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #667025

    When it comes time to sharpen your chisel or other tools, what is your step by step process and what brands of stones, sandpaper, or other sharpening systems do you use?

    Bonus question: I was told never to oil my chisels because the oil will get in the wood I’m working on. Well while that does make sense, metal rusts really easily in Hawaii and if time and care is spent sharpening chisels I don’t want it to be ruined by rust. So I’m thinking I’ll rub them with oil when their gonna be out of use for a wile and clean them with dish detergent to cut the oil before using them. Any other solutions or improvements to my basic idea?

    Oil them. I use mineral oil, which won’t hurt the wood any, and the rags won’t easily combust.

    I used to use water stones, but the mess was a pain. Now I use DMT Diasharp diamond stones and a veritas guide (my freehand skills are not great) then move to DIAPaste and eventually the strop with the veritas honing stuff loaded into the leather

    #667027

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    When it comes time to sharpen your chisel or other tools, what is your step by step process and what brands of stones, sandpaper, or other sharpening systems do you use?

    Bonus question: I was told never to oil my chisels because the oil will get in the wood I’m working on. Well while that does make sense, metal rusts really easily in Hawaii and if time and care is spent sharpening chisels I don’t want it to be ruined by rust. So I’m thinking I’ll rub them with oil when their gonna be out of use for a wile and clean them with dish detergent to cut the oil before using them. Any other solutions or improvements to my basic idea?

    Oil them. I use mineral oil, which won’t hurt the wood any, and the rags won’t easily combust.

    I used to use water stones, but the mess was a pain. Now I use DMT Diasharp diamond stones and a veritas guide (my freehand skills are not great) then move to DIAPaste and eventually the strop with the veritas honing stuff loaded into the leather

    I use furniture wax which is usually handy and gives a measure of protection. I use it on the cast tables on my machinery, too. Never had any issues with transfer to wood.

    For sharpening, I use diamond stones for the initial go, 1000 and 3000 grit, then finish with an 8000 grit waterstone. For touchups, I just do a quick couple of strokes on the waterstone and I’m good to go.

    Life does not give participation awards.

    ...Gary Rogowski

    #667029

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    First thing I do is gather a bunch of items so I can tackle it at once.

    Then I get in the truck and drive to the next town to drop them off for sharpening…..LOL cant beat the time saving and quality.

    Its an improvement for me. I used to just buy new chisels all the time and found I was accumulating too many.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #667035

    Oil them. I use mineral oil, which won’t hurt the wood any, and the rags won’t easily combust.

    Ok mineral oil is for sure my next purchase

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #667036

    I use furniture wax which is usually handy and gives a measure of protection. I use it on the cast tables on my machinery, too. Never had any issues with transfer to wood.

    For sharpening, I use diamond stones for the initial go, 1000 and 3000 grit, then finish with an 8000 grit waterstone. For touchups, I just do a quick couple of strokes on the waterstone and I’m good to go.

    Hmm I really like how you have a touchups technique.

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #667043

    I am thinking of transitioning to diamond stones when my water stone wears out. That should be in a few years. I don’t often go to the stones, but I stop often and give a few swipes on the strop. Going to make a new one of those soon. The stone I use when I do use one is a 1000/4000 grit combination stone. For a new tool that I have just got, or for the axe, I use a hardware store oil stone with 2 grits on it. I forget what the grits are I have had it that long.

    I have a Veritas mkll honing guide I use once in a while. I use the stones so little though that most of it is freehand.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #667324

    ProTom
    Pro
    Bear Lake, MI

    I would also like to know more about sharpening. I use a bench grinder if they are real bad, then use a Smith TriHone sharpening stone. I would like to get some diamond stones and wet stones. But for now the TriHone works fine. I do need a guage to keep the correct angle.

    I like watching Rob Cosman sharpen things, he seems to really know his stuff.

    Always learning, and some teaching along the way.

    #667325

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    A long video but some very good sharpening information.

    Life does not give participation awards.

    ...Gary Rogowski

    #667335

    I use a bench grinder if they are real bad

    Gotta be really careful using the bench grinder, it only takes a few seconds too long to over heat and soften the metal. I worked as a landscaper for a year and would watch the worlds grumpiest lawn mower operator ruin his lawn mower blades ever other day overheating them on the bench grinder. You’re supposed to have a bucket of water handy and constantly dip your metal in it to keep it cool, I tried to tell them at that company but they had no interest in improving their methods. You probably already knew this but it’s good info to share if any new members are reading this thread and think to themselves, “I have a bench grinder! I’m gonna go sharpen my grandpa’s old hand tools!”.

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #667339

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    I use DMT diamond stones. I use them wet most often (with water), but they can be used dry. Progression from medium to fine to very fine. Sharpening for me is a quick process once the bevel is set initially. I used to use the Veritas MKII sharpening jig, but I’ve found it to be a waste of time to set up just for touching up edges (90% of the sharpening I do at least). When I rehab or regrind a bevel, then I use the jig. Strop at the end with stropping compound.

    #667342

    Sparky603
    Pro
    Rural, NH

    The 3rd New Hampshire Mountain Sharpening Regiment, under Brigadier General Lester “Ol’ Leather Strop” Simpson – known for his chiseled features and razor-sharp wit. We were often the tip of the spear, knifing though the enemy, cutting them down with reckless abandon.

    3rd gen. master electrician / electrical contractor. Professional tradesman since 1987.

    #667344

    The 3rd New Hampshire Mountain Sharpening Regiment, under Brigadier General Lester “Ol’ Leather Strop” Simpson – known for his chiseled features and razor-sharp wit. We were often the tip of the spear, knifing though the enemy, cutting them down with reckless abandon.

    VERB
    (be regimented)

    organize according to a strict, sometimes oppressive system or pattern:
    “every aspect of their life is strictly regimented”
    synonyms: organize · order · systematize · control · regulate · manage · discipline

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #667354

    ProTom
    Pro
    Bear Lake, MI

    I use a bench grinder if they are real bad

    Gotta be really careful using the bench grinder, it only takes a few seconds too long to over heat and soften the metal. I worked as a landscaper for a year and would watch the worlds grumpiest lawn mower operator ruin his lawn mower blades ever other day overheating them on the bench grinder. You’re supposed to have a bucket of water handy and constantly dip your metal in it to keep it cool, I tried to tell them at that company but they had no interest in improving their methods. You probably already knew this but it’s good info to share if any new members are reading this thread and think to themselves, “I have a bench grinder! I’m gonna go sharpen my grandpa’s old hand tools!”.

    yes you are correct and when I sharpen on a bench grinder its hard to explain, but I move it back and fourth at a steady pace with very light pressure. I use my bare hands so I can tell if its getting too hot, which it wont if you keep it moving with very light pressure. It takes time even on a bench grinder.

    Always learning, and some teaching along the way.

    #667412
    #667413

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Worksharp. http://www.worksharptools.com/sharpeners-36/woodworking/ws3000.html

    Then what @bobsmononcle? The work sharp system will only get you so far (assuming you are shooting for a mirror edge that you could shave with).

    My sharpening is done with my Veritas jig and a few whetstones ranging from 800g to 6000g. Since upgrading my chisels to a higher quality steel, I have found that I really don’t need to use the lower grits to tune them up. My older Irwins would get dings in the blade that would require extensive work to remove though.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #667427

    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    I use this sled

    http://alisam.com/alisam-sharpening.html

    with sandpaper glued on a 3″ wide granite slab. That’s for planes and shop chisels.
    Chisels that go in the truck I sharpen them on a 1×42 Viel belt grinder. It’s faster than sled.

    #667440

    Clev08
    Pro

    I use DMT diamond stones. I use them wet most often (with water), but they can be used dry. Progression from medium to fine to very fine. Sharpening for me is a quick process once the bevel is set initially. I used to use the Veritas MKII sharpening jig, but I’ve found it to be a waste of time to set up just for touching up edges (90% of the sharpening I do at least). When I rehab or regrind a bevel, then I use the jig. Strop at the end with stropping compound.

    You took the words right out of my mouth. I had some cheaper diamond plates before but I just got an 8 inch dmt. The longer strokes allow me to sharpen much faster.

    #667480

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    Worksharp. http://www.worksharptools.com/sharpeners-36/woodworking/ws3000.html

    Then what @bobsmononcle? The work sharp system will only get you so far (assuming you are shooting for a mirror edge that you could shave with).

    My sharpening is done with my Veritas jig and a few whetstones ranging from 800g to 6000g. Since upgrading my chisels to a higher quality steel, I have found that I really don’t need to use the lower grits to tune them up. My older Irwins would get dings in the blade that would require extensive work to remove though.

    I agree entirely, the higher quality steel needs only a touchup on the finest stone to go back to work. Once the bevel is established and the back flattened, you shouldn’t need more than a quick hone on the finest grit or a few strokes on the strop.

    Life does not give participation awards.

    ...Gary Rogowski

    #667502

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I have some diamond stones and I should really use them sometimes….

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

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