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What is essential in a good woodworking bench?

Viewing 20 posts - 961 through 980 (of 1,005 total)
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  • #561122
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Here are the pics of the finished bench.

    That’s something to be proud of.. very nice!

    #561160

    @smallerstick once again Peter, it’s an awesome work bench.
    Very nice to have a big window in front of the bench.
    when are you taking orders 🙂 I want one.

    #561166
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Here are the pics of the finished bench. The walnut tool rack behind the tray was a bit of an afterthought but I think I will enjoy having it there.

    That turned out really nice. Are you nervous about the hammer and chisel marks now? The first one, like dents in a car, is the hardest one to take.

    lol actually, the first blemish is a water mark from my beer glass. I think that is perfectly appropriate! It’s been properly christened.

    Gorgeous!

    Thanks, Eric, your bench was my first inspiration. Following your build gave me the confidence to just do it.

    amazing work, i really like how well the wood turned out. I have high hopes for mine. It started raining so i pulled everything in and stopped planing lol.

    The material we have is not perfect but it’s a workbench, not fine furniture. The wood is beautiful in its imperfection. Yours will turn out well, I know.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #561169
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Here are the pics of the finished bench.

    That’s something to be proud of.. very nice!

    Thanks, Dirty, I am.

    @smallerstick once again Peter, it’s an awesome work bench.
    Very nice to have a big window in front of the bench.
    when are you taking orders 🙂 I want one.

    Not for a while if you don’t mind. A job like that has turned my shop upside down. It will take me a while to get reorganized and put everything back together.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #561314
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Very very very nice. Did I say it was nice. Wow

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #561452
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Here are the pics of the finished bench. The walnut tool rack behind the tray was a bit of an afterthought but I think I will enjoy having it there.



    @smallerstick
    ,
    Don’t know how I missed this.
    Congrats, That is a great looking bench.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #561701
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Very very very nice. Did I say it was nice. Wow

    Thanks, Bill

    Here are the pics of the finished bench. The walnut tool rack behind the tray was a bit of an afterthought but I think I will enjoy having it there.

    @smallerstick,
    Don’t know how I missed this.
    Congrats, That is a great looking bench.

    Thanks, Frank, next job is a stand for the Glide beside the bench. It will do double duty as an extension table.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #561726
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    The end caps, how did you mount them to the table? did you have a nut set in to the wood and than use the huge screws?

    #561744
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    The end caps, how did you mount them to the table? did you have a nut set in to the wood and than use the huge screws?

    There is a stub tenon on each end of the benchtop. The endcaps are fastened using 5/16 x 4″ lag bolts. I was thinking of machine bolts with nuts mortised into the benchtop like I did with the front and back stretchers but the endcaps don’t have the same kind of forces applied to them.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    Attachments:
    #561749
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    The end caps, how did you mount them to the table? did you have a nut set in to the wood and than use the huge screws?

    There is a stub tenon on each end of the benchtop. The endcaps are fastened using 5/16 x 4″ lag bolts. I was thinking of machine bolts with nuts mortised into the benchtop like I did with the front and back stretchers but the endcaps don’t have the same kind of forces applied to them.

    okay so basically you drill a hole slightly smaller than the lag bolt and drove it in?

    #561758
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    The end caps, how did you mount them to the table? did you have a nut set in to the wood and than use the huge screws?

    There is a stub tenon on each end of the benchtop. The endcaps are fastened using 5/16 x 4″ lag bolts. I was thinking of machine bolts with nuts mortised into the benchtop like I did with the front and back stretchers but the endcaps don’t have the same kind of forces applied to them.

    okay so basically you drill a hole slightly smaller than the lag bolt and drove it in?

    Yep, that’s the idea. I drilled a 7/8″ counterbore to accept the washer about 1/2″ deep then a 5/16″ hole about 3/4″ through the end cap to allow clearance for the shoulder of the lag bolt then followed with a 1/4″ drill slightly deeper than the length of the bolt. The bolt heads are just about flush with the end caps. One of the holes is slightly elongated to allow for seasonal change.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #561801
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    The end caps, how did you mount them to the table? did you have a nut set in to the wood and than use the huge screws?

    There is a stub tenon on each end of the benchtop. The endcaps are fastened using 5/16 x 4″ lag bolts. I was thinking of machine bolts with nuts mortised into the benchtop like I did with the front and back stretchers but the endcaps don’t have the same kind of forces applied to them.

    okay so basically you drill a hole slightly smaller than the lag bolt and drove it in?

    Yep, that’s the idea. I drilled a 7/8″ counterbore to accept the washer about 1/2″ deep then a 5/16″ hole about 3/4″ through the end cap to allow clearance for the shoulder of the lag bolt then followed with a 1/4″ drill slightly deeper than the length of the bolt. The bolt heads are just about flush with the end caps. One of the holes is slightly elongated to allow for seasonal change.

    Great idea. I was wonder myself if you used LV bolts in the top to tie it together. Are the ones in the stretchers from LV?

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #561818
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    The end caps, how did you mount them to the table? did you have a nut set in to the wood and than use the huge screws?

    There is a stub tenon on each end of the benchtop. The endcaps are fastened using 5/16 x 4″ lag bolts. I was thinking of machine bolts with nuts mortised into the benchtop like I did with the front and back stretchers but the endcaps don’t have the same kind of forces applied to them.

    okay so basically you drill a hole slightly smaller than the lag bolt and drove it in?

    Yep, that’s the idea. I drilled a 7/8″ counterbore to accept the washer about 1/2″ deep then a 5/16″ hole about 3/4″ through the end cap to allow clearance for the shoulder of the lag bolt then followed with a 1/4″ drill slightly deeper than the length of the bolt. The bolt heads are just about flush with the end caps. One of the holes is slightly elongated to allow for seasonal change.

    Great idea. I was wonder myself if you used LV bolts in the top to tie it together. Are the ones in the stretchers from LV?

    I looked at the LV barrel bolts fora bench but decided against spending over $30 for them. Regular machine bolts and nuts do the job just fine.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #561984
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    The end caps, how did you mount them to the table? did you have a nut set in to the wood and than use the huge screws?

    There is a stub tenon on each end of the benchtop. The endcaps are fastened using 5/16 x 4″ lag bolts. I was thinking of machine bolts with nuts mortised into the benchtop like I did with the front and back stretchers but the endcaps don’t have the same kind of forces applied to them.

    okay so basically you drill a hole slightly smaller than the lag bolt and drove it in?

    Yep, that’s the idea. I drilled a 7/8″ counterbore to accept the washer about 1/2″ deep then a 5/16″ hole about 3/4″ through the end cap to allow clearance for the shoulder of the lag bolt then followed with a 1/4″ drill slightly deeper than the length of the bolt. The bolt heads are just about flush with the end caps. One of the holes is slightly elongated to allow for seasonal change.

    Great idea. I was wonder myself if you used LV bolts in the top to tie it together. Are the ones in the stretchers from LV?

    I looked at the LV barrel bolts fora bench but decided against spending over $30 for them. Regular machine bolts and nuts do the job just fine.

    too be honest i really like the end cap with tool tray, i am really tempted to go the same route after seeing yours, did you follow a plan?

    #562075
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    too be honest i really like the end cap with tool tray, i am really tempted to go the same route after seeing yours, did you follow a plan?

    lol Here is the planning process…..I watched part of a video showing a guy who basically tacked a 1 x 1 to the wall using 1/2″ spacers and called it a tool rack; really lame effort. Anyway, I had just finished ripping a piece of 1 x 6 walnut to 4″ for the rear of the tool tray and I’m thinking the bench is going in front of the window and I don’t have a place to put tools behind the bench and this walnut offcut is looking me right in the face. The rest is history; rip the offcut to 1 x 1, add some spacers and voila. It’s a technique I learned at the @JimDaddyO school of design. Do with what you have to get what you want.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #562117
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    too be honest i really like the end cap with tool tray, i am really tempted to go the same route after seeing yours, did you follow a plan?

    lol Here is the planning process…..I watched part of a video showing a guy who basically tacked a 1 x 1 to the wall using 1/2″ spacers and called it a tool rack; really lame effort. Anyway, I had just finished ripping a piece of 1 x 6 walnut to 4″ for the rear of the tool tray and I’m thinking the bench is going in front of the window and I don’t have a place to put tools behind the bench and this walnut offcut is looking me right in the face. The rest is history; rip the offcut to 1 x 1, add some spacers and voila. It’s a technique I learned at the @jimdaddyo school of design. Do with what you have to get what you want.

    Now I don’t know if I am a good or bad influence….lol.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #562150

    Here are the pics of the finished bench. The walnut tool rack behind the tray was a bit of an afterthought but I think I will enjoy having it there.

    That turned out really nice. Are you nervous about the hammer and chisel marks now? The first one, like dents in a car, is the hardest one to take.

    Awesome bench – enjoy it, and don’t worry about the marks, it is not a dining room table 🙂 marks on a bench are character!

    Will

    #562162
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    too be honest i really like the end cap with tool tray, i am really tempted to go the same route after seeing yours, did you follow a plan?

    lol Here is the planning process…..I watched part of a video showing a guy who basically tacked a 1 x 1 to the wall using 1/2″ spacers and called it a tool rack; really lame effort. Anyway, I had just finished ripping a piece of 1 x 6 walnut to 4″ for the rear of the tool tray and I’m thinking the bench is going in front of the window and I don’t have a place to put tools behind the bench and this walnut offcut is looking me right in the face. The rest is history; rip the offcut to 1 x 1, add some spacers and voila. It’s a technique I learned at the @jimdaddyo school of design. Do with what you have to get what you want.

    Now I don’t know if I am a good or bad influence….lol.

    DEfinitely a good influence, Jim. Your projects with wood rescued for the firewood pile are an inspiration.

    Here are the pics of the finished bench. The walnut tool rack behind the tray was a bit of an afterthought but I think I will enjoy having it there.

    That turned out really nice. Are you nervous about the hammer and chisel marks now? The first one, like dents in a car, is the hardest one to take.

    Awesome bench – enjoy it, and don’t worry about the marks, it is not a dining room table 🙂 marks on a bench are character!

    I better get some marks on it soon; my wife has been looking at it. LOL

    Character; kind of like the marks you hate to get on a new canoe, “bear bites”, we called them.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #562495
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Do with what you have to get what you want.

    Sounds like the custom car builder John Buttera who really pioneered the billet look. When asked one time how he made a rear view mirror out of a solid hunk of aluminum he replied “I just cut away everything that did not look like a rear view mirror”. Mind you this was in the early eighties way before CNC he was creating billet stuff using a bandsaw and belt sander/grinder. Was really doing amazing work.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #562914
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    not a fan of the screws he used but not bad

Viewing 20 posts - 961 through 980 (of 1,005 total)
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