dcsimg

What is essential in a good woodworking bench?

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 1,005 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #404003
    yellaD
    Pro

    Sorry for the confusion, my last post was for @smallerstick. I’m always curious to what people choose as their vise. I agree that the bench should be shorter than what you’d first expect. I’m thinking mine will be under 31″.

    #404078
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I agree that the bench should be shorter than what you’d first expect. I’m thinking mine will be under 31″.

    31″ or 32″ is a good height if you plan on using a vice. I have one of my work benches set a bit higher so I can comfortably work at it without bending over. Great for that but it makes the vice high and sometimes that can work against you.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #404127
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    Bench height is a personal choice. Problem is, you don’t know what it is until you start working at that height. But you can always add feet or cut legs later.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #404137
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Bench height is a personal choice. Problem is, you don’t know what it is until you start working at that height. But you can always add feet or cut legs later.

    Valid point. I prefer a higher top as I don’t care for bending over a bench for an extended period of time.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #404142
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Valid point. I prefer a higher top as I don’t care for bending over a bench for an extended period of time.

    Jon you are correct. The only time a higher bench makes a difference is if you use a lot of bench mounted tools. Let’s say a bench mounted table saw, if the bench is comfortable to work on without bending over, putting the saw on top may make it at a less than optimal height to see down on. Same with a vice. My higher than normal bench has a vice. Fir holding something it is fine, but if I need to hammer on it I lose 10″ of swing because the bench is higher than normal. All personal preferences which is why I have 4 work benches at different heights.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #404146

    Valid point. I prefer a higher top as I don’t care for bending over a bench for an extended period of time.

    Jon you are correct. The only time a higher bench makes a difference is if you use a lot of bench mounted tools. Let’s say a bench mounted table saw, if the bench is comfortable to work on without bending over, putting the saw on top may make it at a less than optimal height to see down on. Same with a vice. My higher than normal bench has a vice. Fir holding something it is fine, but if I need to hammer on it I lose 10″ of swing because the bench is higher than normal. All personal preferences which is why I have 4 work benches at different heights.

    If you intend to use hand planes, it is absolutely important to keep it pretty low though. You want it somwhere between your wrist and your fingers when you are standing straight. Otherwise, you will never push your planes as smoothly and as constantly. Move with your weight and not your muscles

    Most people are not building for hand planes these days, but you are building a Roubo. Hand tools are the whole reason to make one that solid and that heavy. Build it low.

    You can always make a small benchtop bench or benchtop moxon to raise the level for fine work up close.

    #404153
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Pics. Sorry for the mess

    @doobie Yup – still upside-down. Again. :)

    Eric,
    ThanX for the pics & link. I hope to one day build a better workbench than what I have cobbled together in the garage today.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #404160
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    There are some pretty experienced and well known, respected wood workers (Paul Sellers is the first that comes to mind) that are proponents of a higher bench. Paul works with hand tools with 40+ years of craftsmanship under his belt and does beautiful work using a higher bench.

    I am about 6′ 3″, so naturally I would gravitate toward a higher bench. Just how high is the question. Again, this is all subjective and has to deal with individual preference. I am of the mind to go taller for myself, but it is all trade offs. I can also see the logic of a lower one if you plan to add a Moxon vice to the top of it for joinery or similar. My back just can’t take all the bending to a lower work height after all these years.

    As an aside, the model used for ergonomics in the industrial workplace is a person of about 5′ 8″ I think. Which, in part, is the reason for my poor posture.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #404169

    There are some pretty experienced and well known, respected wood workers (Paul Sellers is the first that comes to mind) that are proponents of a higher bench. Paul works with hand tools with 40+ years of craftsmanship under his belt and does beautiful work using a higher bench.

    I am about 6′ 3″, so naturally I would gravitate toward a higher bench. Just how high is the question. Again, this is all subjective and has to deal with individual preference. I am of the mind to go taller for myself, but it is all trade offs. I can also see the logic of a lower one if you plan to add a Moxon vice to the top of it for joinery or similar. My back just can’t take all the bending to a lower work height after all these years.

    As an aside, the model used for ergonomics in the industrial workplace is a person of about 5′ 8″ I think. Which, in part, is the reason for my poor posture.

    As a fellow 6’3-er, I subscribe to heights being relative to body parts. I think Paul Sellers uses 34-36 inches, which is much higher than most suggestions, but he is a tall guy. Mine is scaled to 34, which is low for me.

    At the end of the day, choose the height that is right for the job you are doing. Lots of joinery can be higher than lots of dimensioning.

    And knowing I will have benchtop power tools, and a benchtop moxon, I wanted to avoid the 40 inch height of a powertool and tinkering table.

    My last roubo was at 36 and I found I could not lean into the plane as much as I want, so Im making this one a bit shorter

    #404359
    yellaD
    Pro

    From the research I’ve done, Chris Schwartz of fine woodworking thinks a bench should fall somewhere between the wristbone protrusion and your first joint of ring finger. For bench planes and chiselling I need it to be low, leaning over a mortise or gouge chisel is important. I’m only 5’5″ so it’s going to be lower than usual, but more than the 28″ minimum for the BenchCrafted Leg vise assembly. Right now I do most chisel work on a board on the floor and no hard core bench planing at home. Hence the need for a workhorse of a bench. BTW, I really appreciate the info that’s being shared, it’s a fun topic and there really is no right or wrong. I’m just curious to what suits the you.

    #404394
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I want to build a Roubo style bench too, but cannot afford the vice hardware. So instead I am thinking dog holes, planing stops, hold fasts (which I have) and battens. Perhaps a crochet and a dead man for edge work, hold fast holes in the legs. Decidedly low tech, but served others way back when for many a decade.

    one of my favourite woodworkers

    http://www.theenglishwoodworker.com/the-holdfast-and-the-batten-video/

    That’s a nice heavy duty bench in that link. I like it.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #404426
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    From the research I’ve done, Chris Schwartz of fine woodworking thinks a bench should fall somewhere between the wristbone protrusion and your first joint of ring finger. For bench planes and chiselling I need it to be low, leaning over a mortise or gouge chisel is important. I’m only 5’5″ so it’s going to be lower than usual, but more than the 28″ minimum for the BenchCrafted Leg vise assembly. Right now I do most chisel work on a board on the floor and no hard core bench planing at home. Hence the need for a workhorse of a bench. BTW, I really appreciate the info that’s being shared, it’s a fun topic and there really is no right or wrong. I’m just curious to what suits the you.

    what about a joinery bench like this one
    http://www.renaissancewoodworker.com/boring-dog-holes/

    I mean you can save the heavy planning for the joinery bench and have a regular bench for glueups and stuff.

    #404529
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    From the research I’ve done, Chris Schwartz of fine woodworking thinks a bench should fall somewhere between the wristbone protrusion and your first joint of ring finger. For bench planes and chiselling I need it to be low, leaning over a mortise or gouge chisel is important. I’m only 5’5″ so it’s going to be lower than usual, but more than the 28″ minimum for the BenchCrafted Leg vise assembly. Right now I do most chisel work on a board on the floor and no hard core bench planing at home. Hence the need for a workhorse of a bench. BTW, I really appreciate the info that’s being shared, it’s a fun topic and there really is no right or wrong. I’m just curious to what suits the you.

    what about a joinery bench like this one
    http://www.renaissancewoodworker.com/boring-dog-holes/

    I mean you can save the heavy planning for the joinery bench and have a regular bench for glueups and stuff.

    Shannon Rogers is also on my subscription list. He does some beautiful work.

    Here is something to consider also, not my cup of tea, but seems functional and does not take up a lot of space.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #404546

    I went with a pre-glued 1 3/4 maple top and built the heavy supporting legs myself out of maple using a combination of plans, with round dog holes. I have been adding vises etc. as time and money allow, and given my satisfaction, I would do it again, pretty much the same way.

    Will

    Will

    #404565
    yellaD
    Pro

    @wbembrid, that’s a solid bench! I’ve thought about buying a pre-fab top and making the legs also, but couldn’t afford a thick enough slab. I have to build and buy in stages and just enjoy the process, from what I’ve researched it’s quite a long one…might never be finished tweaking it. 🙂

    #404706
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    I went with a pre-glued 1 3/4 maple top and built the heavy supporting legs myself out of maple using a combination of plans, with round dog holes. I have been adding vises etc. as time and money allow, and given my satisfaction, I would do it again, pretty much the same way.

    Will

    That is a bench to be proud of. Nice job.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #404707
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    I went with a pre-glued 1 3/4 maple top and built the heavy supporting legs myself out of maple using a combination of plans, with round dog holes. I have been adding vises etc. as time and money allow, and given my satisfaction, I would do it again, pretty much the same way.

    Will

    That is a bench to be proud of. Nice job.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #404722
    yellaD
    Pro

    I’ve seen a guy make his knock down bench out of 2X and 4x mixed wood with a Veritas inset vise and Grammercy holdfasts with dog holes and he says it’s enough to do his projects on as well as able to bring it downstairs during the winter. He piled his compressor and tools on the storage level to weigh it down.

    #404724

    I’ve seen a guy make his knock down bench out of 2X and 4x mixed wood with a Veritas inset vise and Grammercy holdfasts with dog holes and he says it’s enough to do his projects on as well as able to bring it downstairs during the winter. He piled his compressor and tools on the storage level to weigh it down.

    The Grammercy holdfasts are a great value, and I highly recommend them if you want to try out holdfasts. If yiu want the best holdfasts, that are insane in how well they work, check out the holdfasts from Black Bear Forge. Real blacksmithed holdfasts – the Grammercy ones I bought arent even part of my bench anymore, I keep them around just in case

    #404732
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    There are a bunch of good videos and articles on “The French Oak Roubo” build. Made from oak that was planted in France around the time Roubo was active. This is a massive bench. Involved in the project(s) were non other than Chris Schwarz and Jameel Abraham (from Benchcrafted). For your enjoyment and amusement….

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 1,005 total)
  • The topic ‘What is essential in a good woodworking bench?’ is closed to new replies.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 1.225 seconds