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What got you in Woodworking

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 59 total)
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  • #550626
    BeardedCarpenter
    Pro
    Winsted, CT

    My dad got me interested in woodworking a long time ago. All the tools I used were his, so when I moved away I had no tools of my own. I didn’t have the time, money, or enough interest to do it on my own.
    Then a little less than 2 years ago I moved back near my dad, regaining access to his tools and knowledge. And I got a job as an apprentice framer/carpenter/builder. I’ve also been trying build up my own collection of tools.

    Just yesterday my dad was showing me how to set up the dado stack on the table saw (I’m not sure how I managed to go this long without ever used it). It’s nice to spend with him in that way.

    #550629
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    Junior high shop class is what got me into woodworking. Grade 8 was when I really took an interest in it and started a small shop of my own in my parents basement. I bought a few tools and started making things to sell and bought more tools with the money I made and I’ve been doing it every since.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #550642
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I’ve been involved in the trades my entire life. My father was a contractor and my stepfather owned a lumber yard. Early in my life I started to build small pieces, including some tables and cabinets and things just grew from there.
    My I interest grew and I aquired more tools…and got even more involved.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #550731
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Mine was a career change. I had been a framing contractor for 20+ years

    Isn’t that woodworking??

    Framing? I don’t consider framing as woodworking. I guess technically, it’s working with wood, so maybe I’m wrong, but that’s not my definition.

    Well yes it is wood working !!LOL!! Maybe not fine woodworking but woodworking. I find if a dame in the bar ask me what I do and I say I’m a carpenter I get a Oh Now if I say I’m a Architectural woodworker I get a completely different responce

    #550732
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    It was the pearling of my buddies dads 14′ hobie cat. We were about 300 yards off the south beach at Ft. Lauerdale in over mast high swells. It was ugly!! We were trapped in and went way under. we swam to shore and gathered parts of the cat off the beach. Well I worked all summer long for free to help pay for parts to put the hobie cat back together. I was 13 or 14 then. Been working construction ever sense. I wished I had gone to school. If I were any smarter I wouldn’t be a carpenter!!!

    #550748

    My dad! I grew up in the garage and on the job with him. He has always been a jack of all trades. One of the smartest guys I know. I tell people all the time I am a lucky one…I get paid to do what I love doing!

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #550838
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Well yes it is wood working !!LOL!! Maybe not fine woodworking but woodworking. I find if a dame in the bar ask me what I do and I say I’m a carpenter I get a Oh Now if I say I’m a Architectural woodworker I get a completely different responce

    LMAO I bet you do.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #550848

    Between my Dad being a carpenter, my first career in engineering, my love of old houses, and my hate of crappy pressed wood products, I think I was doomed 🙂 I decided that I could do better than any of the stuff I could afford to purchase, that and I seem to have expensive tastes, when in a furniture store, or any place with quality I gravitate to the most expensive piece, without looking at the price tags, just because they seem to be better made. So I end up woodworking, it is also a good creative outlet since I can’t draw, sing, play an instrument etc.

    Will

    #550853
    Clev08
    Pro

    Grew up helping my dad on his construction jobs which peaked my interest for building things. But I think both my grandfathers having wood shops steered my in the woodworking direction.

    #550871
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    I guess I should admit some influence from my Dad too. He did some nice projects and lots of renovations on the house I grew up in. I still treasure a few tools that I had handed down to me.

    Our High School did not have a wood shop. It did have a pretty good shop program though. In the first 2 years Drafting was compulsory and you could take 4 all together 2 for the first half of the year a and 2 in the second half. The choices, besides Drafting were, Machine Shop, Welding, Auto Mechanics and Electricity. So you had to decide which one you didn’t want. I didn’t take Machine Shop, which in hind sight, was the one I should have taken. In the second 2 years you could choose one. I went with Auto Mechanics, as I was (and still am) a bit of a car nut. The shop classes were schedules as 2 40 minute periods. Those classes always went by too fast for me.

    Odd thing is that most of the students in the shop course took the “General” courses in everything else (math, science, english, geography, etc) while I opted for the “Advanced” courses. I was the only one in the school who took that route. They hated working out my schedule. Part of my day in shop was hanging with athletes and stoners, and the other classes I was with the brainiacs. It was weird because High School is a very clique oriented place, and I fit none of them.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #550873
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    now it was really @58chev who got me into home renovations. He showed me a few years ago how to do drywall, mudding, concrete, plumbing, laminate floor installing, etc.

    #550878

    I guess I should admit some influence from my Dad too. He did some nice projects and lots of renovations on the house I grew up in. I still treasure a few tools that I had handed down to me.

    Our High School did not have a wood shop. It did have a pretty good shop program though. In the first 2 years Drafting was compulsory and you could take 4 all together 2 for the first half of the year a and 2 in the second half. The choices, besides Drafting were, Machine Shop, Welding, Auto Mechanics and Electricity. So you had to decide which one you didn’t want. I didn’t take Machine Shop, which in hind sight, was the one I should have taken. In the second 2 years you could choose one. I went with Auto Mechanics, as I was (and still am) a bit of a car nut. The shop classes were schedules as 2 40 minute periods. Those classes always went by too fast for me.

    Odd thing is that most of the students in the shop course took the “General” courses in everything else (math, science, english, geography, etc) while I opted for the “Advanced” courses. I was the only one in the school who took that route. They hated working out my schedule. Part of my day in shop was hanging with athletes and stoners, and the other classes I was with the brainiacs. It was weird because High School is a very clique oriented place, and I fit none of them.

    Thats funny. My school was even worse. We had Intro to technology in the 9th grade, which was a term of woodshop, a term of home ec cooking, a term of sewing, and a term of computers (when those were new things, and there was no such thing as an internet or a colour screen)

    At the 10th and 11th grades, they had more in-depth classes, but those of us who took the advanced classes required to go to cegep or university could not take them. So it was officially the classes taken by those who would not be able to go further than high school. And those of us who could take the advanced classes kind of had to, to keep our options open. As such, I never got to take auto shop or the full year-long woodworking class.

    #550893
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    I’d have to thank my dad for teaching me what I know today. He tried his hardest to get me into the carpenters union, I got my name on the waiting list but that mentioned waiting for over a year for their call. He was mainly a cement head but had his hands in everything.

    I don’t do fine woodworking just some framing,decks and home renos for myself and family.

    The high school I went to was also a trade school, 3 years of machine shop and drafting. A bunch of introduction shop classes that never interested me.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #550906

    When I was a kid I used to build elaborate toy guns with spare lumber. Since then I’ve taken on a ton of DIY projects culminating in gutting and rebuilding my brothers last home which was nearly in tear-down condition when he purchased it.

    #551008
    gomoto69
    Pro
    salmon arm, bc

    Lots of similar stories here, either learning through a shop class or a father figure. I hope the young generations can put down their phones long enough to take an interest in the trades, using their hands to create, but i’m skeptical. Our school system, here in canada anyway, treats the trades as somewhere for people to go if they’re not smart enough for university, which the whole system is geared towards. I see too many young people with a university degree that gets them nowhere, and a huge student debt to start their lives. Trades should be promoted more in school as a valuable part of the system, a career to be proud of, we’re not all wired to sit at a desk all day, i’m not. I think the best toy in the world for a little boy or girl is a bag of nails and a hammer, can change a life!

    #551119

    now it was really @58chev who got me into home renovations. He showed me a few years ago how to do drywall, mudding, concrete, plumbing, laminate floor installing, etc.

    Think we forget the friends that help us. I picked up some good info while Chris was doing your steps about concrete. Nice knowing folks in the trades

    #551171
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    I love the common threads that run through many of these posts 🙂 My dad, my school, love for making things…that’s my story too! I grew up with a dad who would always fix everything himself. From cars to our houses, the man could do anything (or that’s how it seemed at least!). And I was always building things – forts, imaginary play spaces with cans and bottles and lots of found items. I started helping my dad as soon as I could hold a hammer, and we worked together through two entire home rebuilds. Then, in middle school, I took a wood shop class and didn’t do great in it, but I loved all the tools and the feel of working in a space like that. But I didn’t get serious about woodworking until I graduated college with no real job prospects except the maintenance job I had picked up during my schooling. So I just kind of fell in to being a handy man, and one day some of my wife’s friends werw talking about wooden growth charts online, and they were SO expensive! I was all “I could do that, and it would cost a third of what they’re asking”. All of a sudden I had twenty orders and I was in business 🙂 It’s changed a lot since then, and I have been able to buy (or have been given!) more than just the drill and circular saw I started out with, and I love it!

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

    #551195
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I love the common threads that run through all these posts 🙂 My dad, my school, love for making things

    It wasn’t my dad, he taught me nothing, I may have had a shop class in school but I must have been on indoor then and can’t remember any of it. I might like to make things but I’ve never had a place to make anything. I do it truly for money. If I could make money any other way I would.

    #551211
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    now it was really 58chev who got me into home renovations. He showed me a few years ago how to do drywall, mudding, concrete, plumbing, laminate floor installing, etc.

    Think we forget the friends that help us. I picked up some good info while Chris was doing your steps about concrete. Nice knowing folks in the trades



    @Siberian
    ,
    You are correct. We tend to forget the friends who assisted us along the way.

    A seasoned interior finisher taught me a lot while doing work in my first house. He at that time had his business for about 25 years and taught me quite a few tricks with drywall, mud and paint.
    An electrician buddy (now retired) helped me wire my current home and I have appreciated what he has taught me. Which allowed me to pull a permit to completely wire my garage when I built it.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #551285
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    I have to add that I am quite enjoying the small projects that my son and I are working on. We were separated by distance when he was young and I didn’t see him much. Now that he is closer we are having a good time when he visits working on things for his home in the shop. He catches on pretty quick too. Nothing like father/kid relationships, even when the kid is over 30.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

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