dcsimg

What do you wear to negotiate crawl spaces?

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #717842
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    What do you all wear when you have a go into a crawl space may be 18″ head room, moldy, damp, and you may have to be in there multiple times possibly over an hour each time?

    Any recommendation?

    In the past I just use cheap disposable painters coveralls, but with me wiggling my back to move around they tear easy and my back gets wet from the damp dirt down here in Florida.

    #717849
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I wear a more rugged mechanics style coverall for something like that myself.

    #717856
    CB
    Pro

    Short sleeve coveralls. The short sleeves was key for me, as the short sleeves permitted 360 degree arm wriggle ability to worm underneath HVAC ducting, and worm through the cut outs in crib and stem walls.

    Often times, it was necessary to sweep my arms “over my head” while lying on my back, in order to reposition a big batt of insulation that had fallen down in the way, and it was easier to repair the insulation attachment than it was to wriggle around it.

    For arm protection against the itches of fiberglass batts, I would take tube socks and cut off the toes, and wear the socks on my arms. Keep in mind, I was doing this FORTY YEARS ago, and was teased mercilessly for it. Now, professional basketball players wear similar “sleeves”, only instead of costing nothing like an old pair of socks with holes already in the soles, they cost $40 and say Nike on them.

    I only wish I had patented the concept of wearing independent sleeves on the arms, like Nike probably did. Seems strange, how something that to me seems so basic… having independent arm protection fully divorced from any constricting connection to an upper garment… can be “patent protected”. Be that as it may, sock sleeves was crawl space outfit I came up with decades ago, without having seen anyone else do it before, or for many years afterward.

    Underneath the short sleeve coveralls was just underwear, with no other foundational layers of constricting work or street clothes. So it wasn’t a matter of donning on a pair of coveralls over my work clothes. It was a matter of finding a private space to change into the coveralls alone. Again, this was to ease my maneuverability under the house, and it also relieved the sense of claustrophobia that can develop when it takes 20 minutes to crawl from the access point to the point of service.

    I also wore a knit cap.

    I will admit that while I always brought a respirator with me, even if in my tool box dragged behind me on a tow rope, I didnt always wear the respirator, as sometimes I just couldn’t get enough air with it on. Dust masks are even worse, as rebreathing one’s own CO2 can sometimes leave one gasping for air more so than breathing in all of the ultra fine particles of dust that get stirred up from worming around obstacles under the house.

    I’ve sometimes had to bring excavation tools to dig my way to where the work needed to be done. So I’d have the tool box on a tether dragging behind me, and larger tools on a cardboard sled that I would push in front of me. And the friction of both what was pushed and what was pulled would stir up yet more dust to have to catch a gulp of air in between pulses of movement.

    I say all of this in past tense, because I’m getting too old to crawl underneath houses any more. The last couple of times I began to question whether I’d make it back out. But that’s what I wore… short sleeve coveralls without clothes, a knit cap, and long tube socks on my arms.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #717968
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    @CB, thanks for the detailed descriptions.

    I also tie to one foot a duffle bag with the tools & parts I know I will need. Although I switched to a beat up luggage case – those with two wheel and a T-handle. I have on occasion leave the tools in the case, zip it up and leave the case in the crawl space where I would need it again tomorrow.

    Tied to the luggage case is a 100′ long extension cord that I drag with me into the crawl space. I have two 15′ long extension cords inside the case if the cord gets caught, I will just extend it instead of trying to free it.

    I lit up the place with a high wattage work light. I also set up a high volume fan on one of the crawl space openings to create a draft through the space if possible.

    Dust and moldiness is just nasty.

    I tried to use a respirator but that’s impossible to work. Especially if you are soldering or brazing.

    I put on coveralls but sweating like bullets inside all over.

    You put tube socks on your arms (have you tried leg warmers?). I cut the short arms off old tee shirts and pull that over my head. Yet I get all sweaty and sooty no matter what.

    I don’t push anything ahead of me, I need to see far ahead since I bumped into close range with a mummified raccoon carcass years ago, freaked me out big time.

    I find it difficult to have to drag 10 footers (EMT conduits, copper pipes) along with me. No good way to do it.

    #717969
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I wear a more rugged mechanics style coverall for something like that myself.

    What about your Makita jacket? With that fully inflated could you almost “glide”? 🤣🤣🤣

    #718036
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I wear a more rugged mechanics style coverall for something like that myself.

    What about your Makita jacket? With that fully inflated could you almost “glide”? 🤣🤣🤣

    It’s made of a pretty sheer material and I wouldn’t try using that sliding around as it could get caught on something and get ripped which would make it rather useless afterwards. I doubt it would even be prudent using it in an attic with all the potential nails and slivered wood common in most attics.

    #718042
    CB
    Pro

    A battery powered Bibendum suit that automatically inflates and deflates the sewn and sealed air chambers in sequence. Pulse propulsion.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #718061

    I always wear an old pair of mechanics style cotton coveralls, they are not waterproof but are not too hot or cold and you end up just washing them after.

    Will

    #718400
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I especially hate having my face full of spider web and having something crawling behind my ears and not know what the heck that is.

    #718426
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I especially hate having my face full of spider web and having something crawling behind my ears and not know what the heck that is.

    No thanks! 👎

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
queries. 0.278 seconds