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What are your favorite hand tool brands?

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  • #491112
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I would like to get into the veritas woodworking tools but I don’t have the time to use them or the money to buy them right now

    I have a bunch of their planes I’ve bought of theirs over the years when I could get a deal on them and have never used them. Guess if it doesn’t have a motor I’m not that inclined to use them.lol!

    #491131
    utopia78
    Pro
    Toronto, ON

    Channel Lock pliers
    older Vise Grip

    I’ve had my Channellocks for over 30 years and love them. I would hate to have to replace them.

    Older Vise Grips, there is nothing like them today, even the re-pop ones that Irwin makes. They just seem so cheaply made.
    I scour lawn sales for them all the time.

    I have a few Channelock and old Vice Grip tools in my box. They seem to last forever.

    A Working Pro since 2004

    #491227

    Knipex and Wiha have replaced some of my Irwin pliers and all of my Craftsman screwdrivers. The Knipex pliers wrenches are great. I also replaced some Irwin pliers with the new German made Irwins. I guess I have become slanted towards German made hand tools of late.

    #491235
    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    Knipex and Wiha have replaced some of my Irwin pliers and all of my Craftsman screwdrivers. The Knipex pliers wrenches are great. I also replaced some Irwin pliers with the new German made Irwins. I guess I have become slanted towards German made hand tools of late.

    I’m big into the German tools lately too. I don’t think I own a pair of pliers that isn’t knipex.

    View post on imgur.com

    #491250
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I have a few Channelock and old Vice Grip tools in my box.

    Some of my vice grips go back to 1976 and they still work great. Bought them off the Snap-on truck at the time.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #559279

    None of the locking pliers that I used this summer worked as well as “real” vise-grips. I don’t have much experience in most things but I used some from at least five different brands, so I think I can make an educated statement.

    #559329
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    When it comes to woodworking tools like chisels or planes I really like Lie-Nielsen and Veritas. Hand tools like pliers etc I usually buy cheaper Mastercraft ones since they aren’t something that I use a whole lot. I like Estwing for hammers and pry bars and I’ve had decent success with Johnson levels although I would like to upgrade to Stabila at some point.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #559337
    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Hmmm I’ve got a bunch. Here goes:

    Veritas, LN, old (prewar) Stanley for handplanes. I’ve got a lot of those.

    Channellock makes a good pair of pliers. Clamps have already been covered in the clamp forum, but Ponys and Besseys are my go-tos.

    Knew Concepts makes my fretsaw (like a coping saw) which I work dovetails with. I love it and would highly recommend it as top of the line. It’s pricey, but it is simply perfect to cut with. Pegas blades for the fretsaw.

    Auriou rasps are handcut in France by a man who is cutting a rasp, smoking a cigarette, eating a baguette, and getting laid at the same time. Somehow he manages to make some of the best rasps known to man while doing all that. For more rough work I like my Shinto rasp, which cuts vigorously, clears easily, and is (relatively) cheap. Highly recommend this as well. Get the Auriou if you’re cutting figurative work. I have one so far (9 grain, left handed). I’d love to get more someday. It was a Christmas present. I love it deeply.

    Starrett is the best of the best combination square. I bought a 12″ new, and have bought an 18″ and a 6″ used at various points in my work. I love them all and would trust them at square 100 years from now. They are the workhorses of my shop. A friend of mine enrolled at the North Bennet Street School, and was promptly told day 1 of class to return his new combo square and get a Starrett. Also, made in MASS!

    Other companies I consider to be (among) the best at what they do in the hand tool world:
    Disston. Millers Falls. Bad Axe (saws). And more.

    Phew, that’s a start.

    #559354
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    For hand tools I have for trowels marshalltown line up for hammer I use estwing all types of irwin and some husky other then that have commercial electric for electric stuff so there’s bunch

    #559358
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    dan, you should consider getting a 10 oz stilleto hammer, ive had my 10 oz for 4 years and my 14 oz framer since 2008.. youll never go back

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #559397
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Always been happy with anything made by Vise-Grip. Do they ever break? Mine never have.

    #559412
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Always been happy with anything made by Vise-Grip. Do they ever break? Mine never have.

    Irwin owns them now…and almost everything Irwin I’ve ever used was somewhat disappointing, so much so that I don’t buy their stuff anymore. OLD vice grips on the other hand are bullet proof.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #559420
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    After going to a lie Nielson show this weekend o have a new favorite hand tool brand

    What are saving for? Their planes are amazing and comparable to the Veritas line of planes.

    While I do have one Lie Nielsen block plane that I really like, if I was someone who used hand planes all the time I would much rather spend the money on something from Veritas/Lee Valley.

    Lie Nielsen is very nice but their designs are based mostly on old Stanley designs for the most part. It is good to see Lee Valley coming up with their own upgrades to these old tools and all the custom options they have on their new tools makes them tailored exactly how they will fit the user best.

    i don’t know how i miss this, but i have lie nielsen low angle block plane and i love it. but you are right veritas has some really nice interesting designs. I would mind having this one

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=61963&cat=1,41182,48942

    #559533
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    After going to a lie Nielson show this weekend o have a new favorite hand tool brand

    What are saving for? Their planes are amazing and comparable to the Veritas line of planes.

    While I do have one Lie Nielsen block plane that I really like, if I was someone who used hand planes all the time I would much rather spend the money on something from Veritas/Lee Valley.

    Lie Nielsen is very nice but their designs are based mostly on old Stanley designs for the most part. It is good to see Lee Valley coming up with their own upgrades to these old tools and all the custom options they have on their new tools makes them tailored exactly how they will fit the user best.

    i don’t know how i miss this, but i have lie nielsen low angle block plane and i love it. but you are right veritas has some really nice interesting designs. I would mind having this one

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=61963&cat=1,41182,48942

    I would like to road test one of those one day but I couldn’t see myself shelling out that kind of coin. The old Stanley models are some of the most durable and reliable hand tools that have ever been made.

    I agree that LV has taken the Stanley designs to a new level but, personally, I don’t see the need to invest in them. Do they make you a better craftsman or improve the quality of your work?

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #559543

    After going to a lie Nielson show this weekend o have a new favorite hand tool brand

    What are saving for? Their planes are amazing and comparable to the Veritas line of planes.

    While I do have one Lie Nielsen block plane that I really like, if I was someone who used hand planes all the time I would much rather spend the money on something from Veritas/Lee Valley.

    Lie Nielsen is very nice but their designs are based mostly on old Stanley designs for the most part. It is good to see Lee Valley coming up with their own upgrades to these old tools and all the custom options they have on their new tools makes them tailored exactly how they will fit the user best.

    i don’t know how i miss this, but i have lie nielsen low angle block plane and i love it. but you are right veritas has some really nice interesting designs. I would mind having this one

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=61963&cat=1,41182,48942

    I would like to road test one of those one day but I couldn’t see myself shelling out that kind of coin. The old Stanley models are some of the most durable and reliable hand tools that have ever been made.

    I agree that LV has taken the Stanley designs to a new level but, personally, I don’t see the need to invest in them. Do they make you a better craftsman or improve the quality of your work?

    Compared to modern big box hand planes? Yes, they do

    They come with a flat bottom, a correct edge, and hold an edge for a long time. Someone who doesn’t know a plane will try a garbage one, and will give up because they think its too hard to use

    An old (pre ww2) stanley bailey or record will be just as good for cheap, but may take lots of work to rehab, which may be beyond someone who doesnt already know how a well tuned plane is supposed to work

    Give me a Veritas or Lie Nielson any day – they are expensive, but they work perfectly right out of the box, even for a rookie. And I have not found anyone else who makes something like the high angle jack planes – insane for tough grain patterns (of course, you could just use card scrapers or sanders, but its not the same)

    In this single case, I will say that a good craftsman can get a passable tool into good shape, but that a rookie or DIY homeowner cannot use the lower grade stuff to any real results. LN and Veritas charge a premium for something that Just Works

    Im happy with my old rehabbed garage sale finds, but my LN block plane, and my Veritas Smoother are my two best planes by far. They helped me to realize how a plane should feel, which gave me the context to better tune the other ones

    #559578
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    On Vise Grips:

    I have a bunch of really old ones, yet I can’t remember actually buying any of them. Most have shown up on equipment I bought over the years holding something in place from the previous owner.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #559647
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    After going to a lie Nielson show this weekend o have a new favorite hand tool brand

    What are saving for? Their planes are amazing and comparable to the Veritas line of planes.

    While I do have one Lie Nielsen block plane that I really like, if I was someone who used hand planes all the time I would much rather spend the money on something from Veritas/Lee Valley.

    Lie Nielsen is very nice but their designs are based mostly on old Stanley designs for the most part. It is good to see Lee Valley coming up with their own upgrades to these old tools and all the custom options they have on their new tools makes them tailored exactly how they will fit the user best.

    i don’t know how i miss this, but i have lie nielsen low angle block plane and i love it. but you are right veritas has some really nice interesting designs. I would mind having this one

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=61963&cat=1,41182,48942

    I would like to road test one of those one day but I couldn’t see myself shelling out that kind of coin. The old Stanley models are some of the most durable and reliable hand tools that have ever been made.

    I agree that LV has taken the Stanley designs to a new level but, personally, I don’t see the need to invest in them. Do they make you a better craftsman or improve the quality of your work?

    Compared to modern big box hand planes? Yes, they do

    They come with a flat bottom, a correct edge, and hold an edge for a long time. Someone who doesn’t know a plane will try a garbage one, and will give up because they think its too hard to use

    An old (pre ww2) stanley bailey or record will be just as good for cheap, but may take lots of work to rehab, which may be beyond someone who doesnt already know how a well tuned plane is supposed to work

    Give me a Veritas or Lie Nielson any day – they are expensive, but they work perfectly right out of the box, even for a rookie. And I have not found anyone else who makes something like the high angle jack planes – insane for tough grain patterns (of course, you could just use card scrapers or sanders, but its not the same)

    In this single case, I will say that a good craftsman can get a passable tool into good shape, but that a rookie or DIY homeowner cannot use the lower grade stuff to any real results. LN and Veritas charge a premium for something that Just Works

    Im happy with my old rehabbed garage sale finds, but my LN block plane, and my Veritas Smoother are my two best planes by far. They helped me to realize how a plane should feel, which gave me the context to better tune the other ones

    Thanks, Eric, I really should get out more. I really need to work with one or 2 of those quality planes a lot more to see just what the difference is. I’m shopping for a low angle block plane right now so maybe the time is right.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #559695

    After going to a lie Nielson show this weekend o have a new favorite hand tool brand

    What are saving for? Their planes are amazing and comparable to the Veritas line of planes.

    While I do have one Lie Nielsen block plane that I really like, if I was someone who used hand planes all the time I would much rather spend the money on something from Veritas/Lee Valley.

    Lie Nielsen is very nice but their designs are based mostly on old Stanley designs for the most part. It is good to see Lee Valley coming up with their own upgrades to these old tools and all the custom options they have on their new tools makes them tailored exactly how they will fit the user best.

    i don’t know how i miss this, but i have lie nielsen low angle block plane and i love it. but you are right veritas has some really nice interesting designs. I would mind having this one

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=61963&cat=1,41182,48942

    I would like to road test one of those one day but I couldn’t see myself shelling out that kind of coin. The old Stanley models are some of the most durable and reliable hand tools that have ever been made.

    I agree that LV has taken the Stanley designs to a new level but, personally, I don’t see the need to invest in them. Do they make you a better craftsman or improve the quality of your work?

    Compared to modern big box hand planes? Yes, they do

    They come with a flat bottom, a correct edge, and hold an edge for a long time. Someone who doesn’t know a plane will try a garbage one, and will give up because they think its too hard to use

    An old (pre ww2) stanley bailey or record will be just as good for cheap, but may take lots of work to rehab, which may be beyond someone who doesnt already know how a well tuned plane is supposed to work

    Give me a Veritas or Lie Nielson any day – they are expensive, but they work perfectly right out of the box, even for a rookie. And I have not found anyone else who makes something like the high angle jack planes – insane for tough grain patterns (of course, you could just use card scrapers or sanders, but its not the same)

    In this single case, I will say that a good craftsman can get a passable tool into good shape, but that a rookie or DIY homeowner cannot use the lower grade stuff to any real results. LN and Veritas charge a premium for something that Just Works

    Im happy with my old rehabbed garage sale finds, but my LN block plane, and my Veritas Smoother are my two best planes by far. They helped me to realize how a plane should feel, which gave me the context to better tune the other ones

    Thanks, Eric, I really should get out more. I really need to work with one or 2 of those quality planes a lot more to see just what the difference is. I’m shopping for a low angle block plane right now so maybe the time is right.

    I love my Lie Nielson block plane. I do kind of regret not getting the shoulder version, where the blade goes all the way to the edge – good for cleaning up tenons. Maybe that one is next

    Either way, this is pure joy, even if I am taking thick shavings here

    #559712
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    After going to a lie Nielson show this weekend o have a new favorite hand tool brand

    What are saving for? Their planes are amazing and comparable to the Veritas line of planes.

    While I do have one Lie Nielsen block plane that I really like, if I was someone who used hand planes all the time I would much rather spend the money on something from Veritas/Lee Valley.

    Lie Nielsen is very nice but their designs are based mostly on old Stanley designs for the most part. It is good to see Lee Valley coming up with their own upgrades to these old tools and all the custom options they have on their new tools makes them tailored exactly how they will fit the user best.

    i don’t know how i miss this, but i have lie nielsen low angle block plane and i love it. but you are right veritas has some really nice interesting designs. I would mind having this one

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=61963&cat=1,41182,48942

    I would like to road test one of those one day but I couldn’t see myself shelling out that kind of coin. The old Stanley models are some of the most durable and reliable hand tools that have ever been made.

    I agree that LV has taken the Stanley designs to a new level but, personally, I don’t see the need to invest in them. Do they make you a better craftsman or improve the quality of your work?

    Compared to modern big box hand planes? Yes, they do

    They come with a flat bottom, a correct edge, and hold an edge for a long time. Someone who doesn’t know a plane will try a garbage one, and will give up because they think its too hard to use

    An old (pre ww2) stanley bailey or record will be just as good for cheap, but may take lots of work to rehab, which may be beyond someone who doesnt already know how a well tuned plane is supposed to work

    Give me a Veritas or Lie Nielson any day – they are expensive, but they work perfectly right out of the box, even for a rookie. And I have not found anyone else who makes something like the high angle jack planes – insane for tough grain patterns (of course, you could just use card scrapers or sanders, but its not the same)

    In this single case, I will say that a good craftsman can get a passable tool into good shape, but that a rookie or DIY homeowner cannot use the lower grade stuff to any real results. LN and Veritas charge a premium for something that Just Works

    Im happy with my old rehabbed garage sale finds, but my LN block plane, and my Veritas Smoother are my two best planes by far. They helped me to realize how a plane should feel, which gave me the context to better tune the other ones

    Thanks, Eric, I really should get out more. I really need to work with one or 2 of those quality planes a lot more to see just what the difference is. I’m shopping for a low angle block plane right now so maybe the time is right.

    I love my Lie Nielson block plane. I do kind of regret not getting the shoulder version, where the blade goes all the way to the edge – good for cleaning up tenons. Maybe that one is next

    Either way, this is pure joy, even if I am taking thick shavings here

    Combination block plane/ shoulder plane? Now you have my interest! I need both of those but, of course, can’t afford 2 new planes. Gonna google that and see what I can find.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #559714
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    I really like starret, I have a square that is about 100 years old that I use everyday.

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