dcsimg

Welding Videos

Viewing 17 posts - 21 through 37 (of 37 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #342457
    sergey061478
    Blocked

    awesome videos, very educational

    #351590
    BryanT
    Blocked
    Lake Ariel, PA

    Incredibly cool slow motion videos of what happens when you weld something. Several different types of welding shown.

    http://www.toolsofthetrade.net/metalworking-tools/five-freaky-welding-videos_o.aspx

    Thank you for posting these great videos.

    BryanT

    #517331

    I don’t do any tig welding at the moment it is all mig welding. But this shows it in a whole new light! Great to watch in slow motion.

    #553230
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I think I’ll drop this little gem here,,,,,,

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #553249
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON
    #553301
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I think I’ll drop this little gem here,,,,,,

    That’s a great hack. Good find Dirty.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #553348
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Great thread, I hadn’t see the videos posted by Kurt.



    @r-ice
    ,
    That is one site I have been checking out for a number of years now.

    Great video on TIG Welding.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #553349

    Neato! I think it is neat how you can actually see the spatter flying on the MIG welding. When I worked at the truck rim factory, Ford charged back 8 hours of labour for every instance of spatter, so they had to be cleaned up well. The centre disk got pressed into the rim then went to the welder. The rim went on to a turn table and the head lowered into the right position and the rest was automated. Had to adjust the height, amps, wire feed rate, gas flow and turn table speed. Cleaning tips and re adjusting as you went. Could not be 100% automated as it needed constant minor adjustments as you went. One operator ran 2 welders at a time. Switched back and forth with the guy cleaning the spatter on the other side of the booth. There were a lot of modified files that we used to make the spatter scrapers.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #553817
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    There were a lot of modified files that we used to make the spatter scrapers.

    Interesting how much work goes into a simple weld on a wheel rim and the manufacturer spec on weld splatter.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #553862

    There were a lot of modified files that we used to make the spatter scrapers.

    Interesting how much work goes into a simple weld on a wheel rim and the manufacturer spec on weld splatter.

    Making the rim itself (the hoop) in an interesting process.

    The flat steel comes in rolls and is flattened and cut to length. Then rolled into a hoop. Each side of the gap is completely clamped and then the clamps move toward each other with voltage applied. No filler rod is used, the steel hoop has enough left on it so that it is the filler material. While still hot from welding it goes into another set of clamps and the slag/burr is cut off by carbide cutters travelling along the length of the weld, much like a broaching machine, on the inside and outside of the hoop, then the ends get trimmed at another machine. After that it goes through a series of roll forming machines to get the profile of the rim. These are put on pallets (robots do that now) and sent to assembly to have the discs pressed and welded in.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #553924
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    here is a good beginner video.

    #553935

    Cool videos, I have saved them in my to watch later list, I missed this thread when it originally started.

    Will

    #554151
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    The flat steel comes in rolls and is flattened and cut to length. Then rolled into a hoop. Each side of the gap is completely clamped and then the clamps move toward each other with voltage applied. No filler rod is used, the steel hoop has enough left on it so that it is the filler material. While still hot from welding it goes into another set of clamps and the slag/burr is cut off by carbide cutters travelling along the length of the weld, much like a broaching machine, on the inside and outside of the hoop, then the ends get trimmed at another machine. After that it goes through a series of roll forming machines to get the profile of the rim. These are put on pallets (robots do that now) and sent to assembly to have the discs pressed and welded in.

    That is really neat. No filler rod is very interesting.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #629953
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    One of my favourite craftsmen. His design process is really well shown here.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #630116
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    One of my favourite craftsmen. His design process is really well shown here.

    Interesting process, Thank you for posting.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #630566
    rerun_1965
    Pro
    holladay, TN

    very cool

    #662470
    LDiaz
    Pro

    Great videos. Thanks for sharing it.

Viewing 17 posts - 21 through 37 (of 37 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 0.437 seconds