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Waterproofing shower penetrations.

Viewing 9 posts - 21 through 29 (of 29 total)
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  • #297080
    redwood
    Pro

    I’m about to undertake this very job for the first time building a shower stall. Any good books out there on this?

    I’ll recommend the Elf.

    http://floorelf.com/

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #297096
    RyanF
    Pro

    Kerdi kits are the way to go. I can buy them a la cart at my supply house. Youd be amazed how well they stick on a bed of aqua defense.

    You put Kerdi over Aqua Defense?

    #297109
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I’m about to undertake this very job for the first time building a shower stall. Any good books out there on this?

    I’ll recommend the Elf.

    http://floorelf.com/

    Thank you. I’ll look that site over later when I have more time. Thanks again!

    #314240
    AndyG
    Pro

    I ve been heavy into wet area work for 15 years and factory trained by schluter.

    2 key things: waterproof is like pregnant, either you are or you aren’t.

    Waterproof it like you aren’t even going to tile it. Tile is just another form of masonry veneer.

    Anyway, just sayin’. Right on those gaskets..good detail. Sweat the details.

    #322609

    I use the Kerdi gaskets. In wish they had a square one and a few sizes.

    But like it was said the trim comes with gaskets, so not a while lot to do. I hate it when the trim is siliconed.

    You have any pictures of the gaskets you used during installation @TNTSERVICES .

    Always willing to learn .

    #339675

    I have remodeled probably a hundred plus bathrooms, and I can honestly tell you, this area should not be of much concern for leaks, considering the fact the shower head does not leak. If the head leaks by either dripping, or worse, spraying back against the mixing valave side of wall, you could have an issue. I always tile the showers myself, and jokes have been made about how precise I tile around the new valve. Most valves of quality will come with gaskets for the trim, and a little sillicone never hurts when done in moderation and neatly. When tiling I try to leave as little opening as possible to help prvent future leaks, and although one day a plumber may swear at me when its time for a new valve, its still very possible to cut or drill tile if necessary, no matter what the tile is made up of, even porcelain. My point is, If theres no leaks on the head, the water should always be directed away, with only minor amounts during use and slightly after use that will reach that area, which is usually protected from the trim components. I do recommend a waterproofing membrane, a professional tile installation considering the fact this is your first defense against leaks, and pay MOST attention to corners and intersecting planes, as these are the critical areas that usually destroy a shower when not properly built underneath. Although sillicone should never be viewed as a permanent solution to almost anything, maintaining a neat bead of silicone in the corners and intersecting planes (including outside of a tub where it meets the floor) will almost always guarantee you an extended life of your shower over the course of many years. Any structure at a given time is always flexing and contracting over time due to temperature and humidity among other things which can cause cracks to appear in those corners if nnot properly installed. Keep them safe from water!!

    Best Regards,
    Joe

    #342963
    sergey061478
    Blocked

    good point. people are going crazy trying to seal every little pinhole but forget a huge hole that is right in front of them. thanks for pointing out the issue and suggesting a good solution too.

    #342971

    I have remodeled probably a hundred plus bathrooms, and I can honestly tell you, this area should not be of much concern for leaks, considering the fact the shower head does not leak. If the head leaks by either dripping, or worse, spraying back against the mixing valave side of wall, you could have an issue. I always tile the showers myself, and jokes have been made about how precise I tile around the new valve. Most valves of quality will come with gaskets for the trim, and a little sillicone never hurts when done in moderation and neatly. When tiling I try to leave as little opening as possible to help prvent future leaks, and although one day a plumber may swear at me when its time for a new valve, its still very possible to cut or drill tile if necessary, no matter what the tile is made up of, even porcelain. My point is, If theres no leaks on the head, the water should always be directed away, with only minor amounts during use and slightly after use that will reach that area, which is usually protected from the trim components. I do recommend a waterproofing membrane, a professional tile installation considering the fact this is your first defense against leaks, and pay MOST attention to corners and intersecting planes, as these are the critical areas that usually destroy a shower when not properly built underneath. Although sillicone should never be viewed as a permanent solution to almost anything, maintaining a neat bead of silicone in the corners and intersecting planes (including outside of a tub where it meets the floor) will almost always guarantee you an extended life of your shower over the course of many years. Any structure at a given time is always flexing and contracting over time due to temperature and humidity among other things which can cause cracks to appear in those corners if nnot properly installed. Keep them safe from water!!

    Best Regards,
    Joe

    I agree the silicone is not the ultimate answer, but definitely provides a good first line of defense. Keeping the tile sealed well can prevent the water from even getting to the other layers.

    #684813

    I’m about to undertake this very job for the first time building a shower stall. Any good books out there on this?

    All trays come in standard sizes such as 700mm, 760mm, 800mm, 900mm & 1000mm, 1200mm etc so your tray WILL be one of those.

    Don’t forget that the tray will be set in the wall slightly because it will have been tiled after installation and all shower screens will take this into account and be slightly smaller than the tray.

    In fact, all enclosures will have adjustments of up to 20mm to cater for variations in installation situations. These details are usually listen in the sales brochure.

    However, with quadrant cubicles, unlike straight trays, you have another consideration to take on board, and that is the shape. Quadrant cubicles and trays always come as an item because each manufacturer makes a slightly differently shaped design. This doesn’t automatically mean a screen won’t fit though, but you need to be very careful.

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