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Vise Replacement Jaw Plates

This topic contains 16 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  r-ice 4 months ago.

Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
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  • #673921

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    I have my Grandpa’s old vise and would like clean it up and use it. But both jaw plates are broke. I really have looked at it much since I got it home. I have been trying find some Replacement Jaw Plates for it. I am just wonder jaw plates from one 6 inch vise fit another 6 inch vise?

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #673931

    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    I am just wonder jaw plates from one 6 inch vise fit another 6 inch vise?

    No/yes/maybe. You would have to match a new set up. L/W of pad and screw hole location/spread. You can get magnetic replacement pads, or depending on use, make a set from wood or cut a chunk of the wifes phenolic cutting board off and make a set from that.

    #673952

    I’d go with wood. A soft wood like cedar or pine. Nice to have a bit of give while still being grippy

    #674023

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    I am just wonder jaw plates from one 6 inch vise fit another 6 inch vise?

    No/yes/maybe. You would have to match a new set up. L/W of pad and screw hole location/spread. You can get magnetic replacement pads, or depending on use, make a set from wood or cut a chunk of the wifes phenolic cutting board off and make a set from that.

    This what I thought. I also thought maybe there was standard size pads. I didn’t know about magnetic pads. I will have to check them out. I have thought about making a set out of wood. I was planning on using this vice for metal type work. I don’t need it for woodworking.

    I’d go with wood. A soft wood like cedar or pine. Nice to have a bit of give while still being grippy

    I was planning on using this for metal use. So I would think pine & cedar would be a way to soft.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #674027

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    You might find a proper answer or actual source for that parts issue on a vintages tools forum.

    I know of this sub forum on the Canadian Woodworking site….

    https://forum.canadianwoodworking.com/forum/tools/hand-tools/vintage-hand-tools

    May be the best place for you to start as you are in Canada.

    But there are other ones out there. Some forum on the internet deals with nothing but vintage stuff, but I can’t recall what it is called. Shouldn’t be too hard to find.

    Good luck Greg!

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #674028

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    I have my Grandpa’s old vise and would like clean it up and use it. But both jaw plates are broke. I really have looked at it much since I got it home. I have been trying find some Replacement Jaw Plates for it. I am just wonder jaw plates from one 6 inch vise fit another 6 inch vise?

    Nice big vise,
    First will it be a general duty,
    Or will you use it for primarily wood?
    We usually change them out at work, just because the typical jaw would mar our pieces,
    We have used nylon block, or aluminum flat bar stock, cut them to length we need, then drill and countersink them.

    The stock we use is 3/4 wide by 1/2 inch, but it depends on you.

    I will take some pictures and add them to this post.

    Here you go, they are banged up, and slightly modified, but easily replaceable.

    #674030

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    We have used nylon block, or aluminum flat bar stock, cut them to length we need, then drill and countersink them.

    The stock we use is 3/4 wide by 1/2 inch, but it depends on you.

    Now that sounds simple enough.

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #674114

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    You might find a proper answer or actual source for that parts issue on a vintages tools forum.

    I know of this sub forum on the Canadian Woodworking site….

    https://forum.canadianwoodworking.com/forum/tools/hand-tools/vintage-hand-tools

    May be the best place for you to start as you are in Canada.

    But there are other ones out there. Some forum on the internet deals with nothing but vintage stuff, but I can’t recall what it is called. Shouldn’t be too hard to find.

    Good luck Greg!

    Thanks for the info Kevin.

    I have my Grandpa’s old vise and would like clean it up and use it. But both jaw plates are broke. I really have looked at it much since I got it home. I have been trying find some Replacement Jaw Plates for it. I am just wonder jaw plates from one 6 inch vise fit another 6 inch vise?

    Nice big vise,
    First will it be a general duty,
    Or will you use it for primarily wood?
    We usually change them out at work, just because the typical jaw would mar our pieces,
    We have used nylon block, or aluminum flat bar stock, cut them to length we need, then drill and countersink them.

    The stock we use is 3/4 wide by 1/2 inch, but it depends on you.

    I will take some pictures and add them to this post.

    Here you go, they are banged up, and slightly modified, but easily replaceable.

    I would like to use for General Duty. I don’t plan on for wood. This may change later on.

    I like the idea of aluminum flat bar stock. I may try this. I also have a piece of plastic from the boards of arena. This might work too. Thanks Brian for tips & pictures.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #674186

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    @gtokley no problem, it’s fast easy, and easily changing, the other option is just a thin piece of aluminum say. 30 thousand thick, just bent over the metal jaw,

    #674198

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    @gtokley no problem, it’s fast easy, and easily changing, the other option is just a thin piece of aluminum say. 30 thousand thick, just bent over the metal jaw,

    Yes it seems fast and easy. It looks like it would be easy change. I probably would have change them all that much. I remember your other option.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #693139

    CB
    Pro

    I like the idea of aluminum flat bar stock. I may try this.

    I have a similar sized, similar style (4.5″ Eron) vice as your Grandpa’s, and I used 3/8″ thick flat aluminum plate stock for vice jaws, albeit I layered four pieces of plate together (one 2″ deep for the cap, and three 1″ deep for the mating bodies), V notched them with different profile grooves, press pinned them together, and added adhesive magnet strips to the vertical and horizontal undersides so they would stay put on the original steel vice jaws.

    This is the underside of the pair, showing the 1″ wide self adhesive magnetic strip that I found at a local Ace hardware store. Surprisingly, the adhesive stuck really well.

    I made 3 different sizes of 45 degree V notches… to accommodate different sizes of round tubes without the vice jaws closing before a good clamp is achieved, and spreading the grip around the round stock over four directions. The notches also grasp hexagonal bars, to grip them vertically from four flats instead of just two, which makes for a handy way to re dress the tips on punches, such as seen here:

    The V notches are not really necessary to hold square stock, but I found that I like gripping the corners of square tubing, where the walls of the tubing join perpendicularly, rather than squeezing across the flats. The corner joints support each other, and seem less vulnerable to deformation, than when a square tube is gripped only on two flats.

    Also, even solid square stock seems to hold better on the corners, requiring less clamp force from the vice itself to stay put, because corner gripping means that the work cannot slip and tilt to the left or right while inbetween the jaws, as can happen when the work is gripped flatly.

    Here is an example of 2″ solid square stock being held in the largest V notch in the vice jaws. I purposely put the largest V groove in the center of the jaws in order to hold the larger dimension work in the center of the 6″ wide jaws:

    To hold smaller work, one of the smaller V grooves on either side is selected, and the magnetically mounted vice jaws can simply be slid over a bit to center the smaller work within the vice. Here is an example of 1/2″ solid bar stock being held vertically in the vice, with the moveable jaws slid to the right for centering:

    Like I said, we have nearly the same vice. The Eron is a Japanese copy of an originally British vice design. My original vice jaws have the typical nicks found in any 60 year old vice, but a pair of slip over magnetic mount vice jaws handily renews and expands the grip of the original jaws.

    One can also find mag mount aluminum slip over vice jaws available commercially, but I never found any that were as long, thick, or as deeply grooved as the custom ones I made above from recycled aluminum plate, with the help of a couple of friends, a cnc water jet, and Autocad Fusion 360 to digitize a 2D pattern for the water jet to cut the 8 pieces that made up the pair.

    #693145

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I used 3/8″ thick flat aluminum plate stock for vice jaws,

    That is a really nice set of vice jaws. Really nice. Great work.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #693152

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    I have a similar sized, similar style (4.5″ Eron) vice as your Grandpa’s, and I used 3/8″ thick flat aluminum plate stock for vice jaws, albeit I layered four pieces of plate together (one 2″ deep for the cap, and three 1″ deep for the mating bodies), V notched them with different profile grooves, press pinned them together, and added adhesive magnet strips to the vertical and horizontal undersides so they would stay put on the original steel vice jaws.

    Really good solution to work holding, actually a significant improvement to anything else I have seen. Outstanding work.

    https://www.instagram.com/woodiworkshop/

    #693196

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    Nice job on the jaw plates CB! 👍

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #693206

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    That’s a great idea, great pictures.
    @cb

    #693214

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    That is a nice set up. Thanks for the pictures. Nice work.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #693232

    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    depends on what you want to clamp, if its wood, id use wood as it’ll mar less then if you were to use steel.

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