dcsimg

V-40 What did you do in the shop / site today?

Viewing 20 posts - 541 through 560 (of 727 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #752494
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    MODERATOR APPROVED POST THAT WAS PREVIOUSLY MENTIONED DIDN’T POST.

    Man that would tire anyone out. Bet you are glad that chore is done. What are you building?

    Loaded, mobilized unloaded 600 pieces of reclaimed Chicago bricks, took two runs. Tired.

    What are you doing with those 🧱

    Did you move them in your SUV 🙄😲

    Got anything in particular planned for them?

    Yes, I moved them with my SUV. I removed the rear seats and laid down some tarp to protect it from getting too dirty, the bricks were full of dirt and bugs etc…

    I am planning on a brick walkway. I need about 240SF, which translates into 1200 pieces. I have purchased these bricks from different sellers over the last few months but I am still about 400 pieces short.

    #752511
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I am planning on a brick walkway. I need about 240SF, which translates into 1200 pieces. I have purchased these bricks from different sellers over the last few months but I am still about 400 pieces short.

    Are they clay bricks? If so, I don’t believe you can use them for walkways. They’re meant for cladding walls. Saturate with water and different pressures alternating on them over time they will just break apart.

    https://www.brickofchicago.com/chicagocommon

    I’ll be surprised if I’m wrong on this @Miamicuse.

    EDIT: Just to give you an example, I saved my clay bricks from a window that was replaced with a walkout 15 years ago. Had them stacked nicely in my backyard for a few years and soon discovered that simply thru freeze thaw cycles many of the top and side bricks were crunbling.

    Re-stacked and covered from the rain/snow. I still have those bricks left, and they’ve been protected outside for over ten years and none have since crumbled.

    While you may think that is simply a freeze thaw issue, I know that concrete bricks don’t have this issue. Those Chicago bricks are clay bricks from what I’ve just read in that link I posted.

    Just go look and see also if anybody offers clay pavers to walk on. I don’t believe I’ve ever seen or heard of such.

    Clay tiles for outside, not sure on that. But maybe that’s a special clay tile for that purpose and has a specific substrate of sand such that it somehow works.

    A clay tile may be more forgiving or simply compressed so densely in manufacturing for such purposes than a Chicago Brick meant to mitigate water infiltration or have effect than what is a clay brick for it’s intended purpose.

    #752514
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    @doobie, clay bricks for walkways, decks and even driveways are very common down here.

    The only difference is if it’s used for driveways, code calls for the bricks to be at least 2.5″. Walkway bricks can be 1.75″. It’s all over south Florida, some are set as pavers with the base bring gravel and sand, the bricks are laid down and compacted with sand, and some are set with mortar.

    I have three houses with clay bricks as driveways, never any issue. The house I am in now, has the chicago bricks driveway since 1972. Not a single crack.

    I don’t know about them up north, but down here the most typical use of reclaimed chicago bricks is for driveways and decks. Now concrete bricks that’s made to look like clay bricks is about $1 a piece, new clay bricks about $2 a piece, genuine reclaimed chicago bricks is about $5 a piece, it’s never really used on walls like it was in Chicago. If someone wants to make a brick wall, what they do down here is to build the wall with concrete blocks, then put over it a brick veneer, which is only about 1/4″ to 1/2″ thick, I think of it more like a clay tile, but it looks like the side of a brick, and if you want to use real chicago bricks it’s possible they would take real chicago bricks and section cut it to thin slices, and use the two end slices because they have the weathered distressed look people are looking for.

    #752516

    Yeah , different climate , another reason why here we can use asphalt for driveways and roads , but you guys use mainly concrete and other materials ,


    @Miamicuse

    I have a refresher course in lockout this morning , from 8:30 till 10:00 , then just finishing up a few little odds and ends at work ,

    #752521
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    but I am still about 400 pieces short.

    Good luck finding and loading them. Hopefully the price for used bricks is way cheaper than new.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #752524
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Good luck finding and loading them. Hopefully the price for used bricks is way cheaper than new.

    Reclaimed bricks are much more expensive then new bricks usually 2-3 times more. This is because of the intensive labor involved. They have to demolish the old brick buildings and carefully remove the bricks, then they have to be processed by hand, to remove mortar all the way around, and suffer breakage during the removal, and many of them if painted on previously would have to have the paint stripped. These bricks fetch $5 for a 4″x8″ piece, compared to brand new concrete brick pavers at $1 or $1.5 a piece, and new clay bricks from $1 to $2 a piece.

    #752536
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I am planning on a brick walkway. I need about 240SF, which translates into 1200 pieces. I have purchased these bricks from different sellers over the last few months but I am still about 400 pieces short.

    Are they clay bricks? If so, I don’t believe you can use them for walkways. They’re meant for cladding walls. Saturate with water and different pressures alternating on them over time they will just break apart.

    https://www.brickofchicago.com/chicagocommon

    I’ll be surprised if I’m wrong on this @Miamicuse.

    EDIT: Just to give you an example, I saved my clay bricks from a window that was replaced with a walkout 15 years ago. Had them stacked nicely in my backyard for a few years and soon discovered that simply thru freeze thaw cycles many of the top and side bricks were crunbling.

    Re-stacked and covered from the rain/snow. I still have those bricks left, and they’ve been protected outside for over ten years and none have since crumbled.

    While you may think that is simply a freeze thaw issue, I know that concrete bricks don’t have this issue. Those Chicago bricks are clay bricks from what I’ve just read in that link I posted.

    Just go look and see also if anybody offers clay pavers to walk on. I don’t believe I’ve ever seen or heard of such.

    Clay tiles for outside, not sure on that. But maybe that’s a special clay tile for that purpose and has a specific substrate of sand such that it somehow works.

    A clay tile may be more forgiving or simply compressed so densely in manufacturing for such purposes than a Chicago Brick meant to mitigate water infiltration or have effect than what is a clay brick for it’s intended purpose.

    @doobie, clay bricks for walkways, decks and even driveways are very common down here.

    The only difference is if it’s used for driveways, code calls for the bricks to be at least 2.5″. Walkway bricks can be 1.75″. It’s all over south Florida, some are set as pavers with the base bring gravel and sand, the bricks are laid down and compacted with sand, and some are set with mortar.

    I have three houses with clay bricks as driveways, never any issue. The house I am in now, has the chicago bricks driveway since 1972. Not a single crack.

    I don’t know about them up north, but down here the most typical use of reclaimed chicago bricks is for driveways and decks. Now concrete bricks that’s made to look like clay bricks is about $1 a piece, new clay bricks about $2 a piece, genuine reclaimed chicago bricks is about $5 a piece, it’s never really used on walls like it was in Chicago. If someone wants to make a brick wall, what they do down here is to build the wall with concrete blocks, then put over it a brick veneer, which is only about 1/4″ to 1/2″ thick, I think of it more like a clay tile, but it looks like the side of a brick, and if you want to use real chicago bricks it’s possible they would take real chicago bricks and section cut it to thin slices, and use the two end slices because they have the weathered distressed look people are looking for.

    Good luck finding and loading them. Hopefully the price for used bricks is way cheaper than new.

    Reclaimed bricks are much more expensive then new bricks usually 2-3 times more. This is because of the intensive labor involved. They have to demolish the old brick buildings and carefully remove the bricks, then they have to be processed by hand, to remove mortar all the way around, and suffer breakage during the removal, and many of them if painted on previously would have to have the paint stripped. These bricks fetch $5 for a 4″x8″ piece, compared to brand new concrete brick pavers at $1 or $1.5 a piece, and new clay bricks from $1 to $2 a piece.

    Thank you for what is essentially an education in what is and what is not feasible in one climate to another on clay bricks.

    I enjoy learning these kinds of nuances. 👍

    #752606
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I enjoy learning these kinds of nuances.

    well, if there wasn’t a giant Chicago fire of 1871 that burned down most of the wood stick houses in Chicago, prompting the city to rebuild with fire resistant materials of that time, we wouldn’t be having reclaimed Chicago bricks. Or, if fire erupted in Toronto instead of Chicago, we would be calling those Toronto bricks today LOL.

    #752614
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    These bricks fetch $5 for a 4″x8″ piece, compared to brand new concrete brick pavers at $1 or $1.5 a piece, and new clay bricks from $1 to $2 a piece.

    Man who would of thought that. Then the advantage is what the look?

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #752618

    I enjoy learning these kinds of nuances.

    well, if there wasn’t a giant Chicago fire of 1871 that burned down most of the wood stick houses in Chicago, prompting the city to rebuild with fire resistant materials of that time, we wouldn’t be having reclaimed Chicago bricks. Or, if fire erupted in Toronto instead of Chicago, we would be calling those Toronto bricks today LOL.

    LoL always great information and with a slight twist of humor , just the way it should be 👍

    #752630
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Received my load of 100 boards of Hardie lap siding for my current shed build yesterday. May not be able to put it on til the spring though.

    #752639
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    May not be able to put it on til the spring though.

    Why not?
    One day work. Lots of fun.

    #752645
    Doobie
    Moderator

    May not be able to put it on til the spring though.

    Why not?

    One day work. Lots of fun.

    You ever put on Hardie siding Sorin? While I screw it on rather than nailing it with a nail gun, it’s not at all like vinyl siding or other siding options.

    I’m just hoping to be able to get the roof structure built, sheathed and shingled at this point along with sealing up the rest of the wall sheating for the winter.

    Sorry, I’m a DIYer and can’t work on this every day either. It’s been a challenge this year, but I’m optimistic I’ll get at least that far with maybe at least the door installed also, but maybe not all three of its windows.

    #752684

    Regular day in the shop ,
    Afterwards , lots of running around , picked up my snow tires that they put on rims , came home , pulled them out of the truck , put my wife’s in the truck , met her at the Nissan dealership , getting her tires done tomorrow ,
    Then came home and looked at the box I received from tools rate , pretty impressive ,

    #752685
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Afterwards , lots of running around , picked up my snow tires that they put on rims , came home , pulled them out of the truck , put my wife’s in the truck , met her at the Nissan dealership , getting her tires done tomorrow ,

    Was gonna get an appointment myself to get my winters swapped on, but then saw the weather warm up for the next week. I try to avoid getting them done when the dailies are still largely in the double digits celsius. Starts to show consistently in the low single digits, that’s when I go.

    #752693

    Afterwards , lots of running around , picked up my snow tires that they put on rims , came home , pulled them out of the truck , put my wife’s in the truck , met her at the Nissan dealership , getting her tires done tomorrow ,

    Was gonna get an appointment myself to get my winters swapped on, but then saw the weather warm up for the next week. I try to avoid getting them done when the dailies are still largely in the double digits celsius. Starts to show consistently in the low single digits, that’s when I go.

    I have three cars to do , plus I drive 30 minutes back and forth to work , highway driving , same for my wife , and I like to have my mil car done just so she has peace of mind ,
    If I worked from home , it wouldn’t really matter , but because we use our cars daily , it’s better safe than sorry , I’m not going to put anyone at risk just to save a few months of treadlife.
    Besides you never know what when and how much Mother nature will throw our way lol.

    #752720
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    Back online. Time to catch up.

    Can I do a whole week and a half in one post? As short as possible here is the adventures in moving story.

    Well, you know the trailer fell off the truck. I figure it was my fault partly. I don’t think I latched it onto the ball correctly. The lock was on top of the ball I think. Which means I did 6 hours of driving at speeds over 110 km/hr with just the tongue weight holding the trailer on.

    When we left I put the transmission in tow/haul mode and thought it had a bit of the thunking sound to it. I guess it was the trailer hooked wrong.

    Of course it came off on a corner right at an underpass, in the rain…lol. Anyway, got it all sorted and the thunk went away.

    Got into Wawa the next day with no issues. Started unloading the trailer and everything was soaked from the rain despite the tarp. Probably from the gaps in the wood floor of the trailer. It took a couple of days to get the rust off my hand tools working a bit at a time.

    The movers were great. Had everything unloaded quickly. No damage. Of course the rain had turned to wet snow by that time. Not everything has found a spot yet and the things that have may find other spots in time, but we are getting settled in.

    No water when we got in. The town guy came and turned it on the next day. Had a bunch of leaks so I took a half day and went about finding and fixing them. Still have one small one but it takes about a week to fill a bucket half way so it is on hold for now.

    The shower stall still isn’t in at HD yet so we are sponge bathing at the kitchen sink. The washer and dryer is in though. It’s a long drive to go to that store, 2 hours or so one way, so we are waiting until everything is in to go. I’ll make sure of the trailer connection this time…lol.

    I will have to get an electrician to wire the dryer outlet. The panel is full, but I did bring the small panel with me from the old house that I was going to use for the shop there. I even have a 30A 220V breaker I hope can be used. I will get him to put it in as a pony panel (sub panel?).

    Speaking of electric, the stove wasn’t working when we got here. No power to the outlet. It had me scratching my head until the realtor’s husband came over and we traced the wire. It was just hanging in mid air at the other end. Luckily the commercial dish washer that used to be here had a feed from the other building the right size, so I put in a box and hooked the stove to the old dish washer feed. It was above the dropped ceiling in the basement, hanging there, live.

    The main feed comes into the other side (the chapel side) and then a 60A pony panel is fed to this side. I think it will be enough as it is not feeding the stove.

    Lot’s of cleaning and organizing to do. I have started some demo on the shop in the basement of the chapel side. Finding some electrical issues there too. I went to change one of the tubes on the florescent fixtures and got a lift from it. No ground wire to the case. So I shut the breaker and took the one with the feed down and added the ground from the feed box to the fixture. There is a ground running to the box. I guess they were just relying on the mounting bracket as the ground. They are all going anyway…eventually. I will but a plug in the octagon box and run LED strips. I have most of the breakers on the chapel side off. Just the what runs lights is turned on. Still finding live wires as I demolish, so I will have to find which of the breakers feed them and shut them off as I go. I will just terminate what I find with a plug. I need more in the shop anyway. It will leave me with lots of unused breakers that I can feed other plugs to the shop, including a 220V or two that I can use for when I upgrade the table saw and get a dust collector or what ever in the future.

    All the windows leak like a bugger. We are putting plastic shrink wrap draft stop kits on them for now. I am going to contract out the job of replacing them and some doors. Just the ones on the home side though. The chapel can wait. The shop windows in the basement are mostly blocked with foam insulation and I think I will just add more and keep them blocked. Tons of room in the shop.

    I think we are going to have a metal roof put on too. That will be contracted out too, along with some soffit and fascia work.

    I am going to take some time and get the camera out and do a walk through of the whole place shortly. That will explain things better.

    All in all I think the place will take some work, but will be a good move in the long run. We are going to make some sort of rental space in the basement. The town is coming alive with the mines opening up and tourism in the area. There are a bunch of motels and you can’t find a room for trying around here, so we ought to be able to make some money off the place. We have no clue what we are doing with the chapel itself. That, and the shop under it I am keeping heated to only about 10 degrees C (around 50F). Just enough so it’s comfy to work and glues and paint will be OK in there.

    I am probably skipping a lot of items, but there is so much to remember and logistics to think about. Some of it will come back over time. Anyone want some work in exchange for free room and board in a stunningly beautiful part of the world, plus a bit of cash? It is just gorgeous up here. Even if it is right around the freezing mark this time of year as a high temp. We have had about -13 C (8 or 9 F) or so as overnight low, but the snow has melted.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #752738
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Sounds like you’re handling it all quite well Jim. Enjoyed reading all that. 👍

    Looking forward to the walk around video. How’s your internet connection there?

    #752755

    @JimDaddyO
    WOW that’s some week and a half Jim ,
    Sounds like you are handling the situation well ,
    Yeah doesn’t matter whether the house is newer or older , always will find things that need fixing or TLC ,
    Looking forward to seeing more from you and your video when you get it up , take care and stay safe and warm

    #752762
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    How’s your internet connection there?

    Wicked fast. Fastest I’ve ever had. Pricey though. I got the 150 mb/s package as it was the slowest one with unlimited data. About $100/month.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

Viewing 20 posts - 541 through 560 (of 727 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 0.658 seconds