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V-28.0 Toolaholic Public Announcement Page

Viewing 8 posts - 1,001 through 1,008 (of 1,008 total)
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  • #740839
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    test,,,
    Looks like I’ve been shadow banned….
    @btp2012


    @RonW

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    Attachments:
    #740844
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Crescent Tool-A-Thon

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #740845
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Craftsman VersaStack System

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #740850
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    test,,,
    Looks like I’ve been shadow banned….
    @btp2012
    RonW

    Not sure what this one is about Dirty. But I got it going for you.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #740813
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I needed a bit to drill some holes for epoxy anchors on a project. With a number of holes to drill, the hollow core vacuum bits save a lot of time and money. No extra cleaning is required for the holes. When picking this one up , I saw they have them down to 1/4” now. I am really looking forward to the day they get them in 3/16 which will work for Tapcons. We install a lot of them and it would be evenetter than the drills with the integrated dust collection.

    That would be great if they can get it down to 3/16″. In the mean time the Simpson’s concrete screws use 1/4″ bits and is a bit beefier than the 1/4″ Tapcon but it’s a bit more $ too. I also bought some GRK Caliburn concrete screws but haven’t tried them out yet.

    I may switch over to 1/4″ plugs when I use up the Tapcon’s I have in stock, I think cleanup and everything would be less that way. The Simpson’s and GRK would seem to be overkill. I have not bought any of the GRK but we have removed them on a couple jobs. They seem to hold well. Once in a while we run into an issue with the Tapcon’s camming out especially in glazed block and we have had issues with them even biting into the material in some bricks, the screw actually strips out. While an old technology, the plastic plugs always seem to do their job. It just is an extra operation when installing the pads.

    Yes Tapcon does tend to spin and I think it’s a combination of many things but I worked on a project in 2018 where we drilled over 500 holes installing aluminum hurricane brackets over and under a bunch of windows. Over the windows we had solid concrete tie beams and under we had regular concrete block. Turned out the drill bit made a huge difference. The Bosch 3/16″ SDS Plus masonry bit had much less problem compared to the Tapcon SDS Plus bit. With the Tapcon bit we were getting 2-3 holes every 20 holes where the screw bottoms and spins, with the Bosch bits 1-2 every 200 holes. Same result whether solid or block. Cleaning was done with compressed air to each hole and I have to conclude the Bosch bit makes a better quality hole. Then the ones that spins you have to do whatever (zip ties, wires, tooth picks, epoxy, spit LOL) to get it to grab snug.

    #740056
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    @Miamicuse have you thought about adding the 12 volt Milwaukee , I think they have a 12 volt die grinder ? Also if you are on the 18 volt batteries why not use their lights this way you won’t have to drag that Bosch light around ☺️

    The reason I bought that Bosch light was because it was onsale for like $19.95 and I happen to have a Bosch battery that I have no tool to use it with. It is a good light but at the time I wasn’t thinking about crawlspace lighting and how weight of a 6.3ah battery would be a bit on the heavier side.

    I do have a die grinder but it’s an air tool, and I haven’t touched one in a while because of the compressor I need to run it with about the only thing I still do air tool wise are the nailers and I am getting out of that too.

    The M12 die grinder looks like this.

    So in some cases not only the length but the girth of the tool presents a challenge. For example, let say you have a piece of steel plate 1.25″ X 8″ long, and you need to cut a rectangular hole 3/4″ X 1″ in size right in the middle (like a dead bolt strike plate that I had to do a few days ago).

    With the M12 grinder, if you use a standard cut wheel which is 2″, you cannot use it to make a 3/4″ cut into the plate, not without completely cutting the plate into half. If you change it to a smaller wheel, the girth of the tool will prevent the smaller wheel from sinking into the plate unless you make the cut at a steep angle and overcut it excessively in the process. Even if you get the right angle die grinder you will have the same issue. On the other hand, the Dremel has a tapered body and could cut a smaller size edge with a small wheel, but if the body gets in the way, you can connect a flex shaft attachment which lowers the profile much further to allow you to use a 3/4″ or 1″ cut wheel to cut a slot that’s just barely over that in size. See the attached picture. This makes a big difference if you are dealing with flat stock, tubings etc…to fabricate to fit something that’s custom. Or if you are trying to cut a rusted flange nut/bolt for a skirted toilet bowl where the recess you try to cut in is surrounded by porcelain on all sides within an inch and you don’t want an accidental slippage.

    I think a die grinder is much more powerful, but sometimes when the size of what you are cutting need to be small, and the profile needs to be low, and the space is tight, the Dremel comes in handy.

    #740054
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    @Miamicuse have you thought about adding the 12 volt Milwaukee , I think they have a 12 volt die grinder ? Also if you are on the 18 volt batteries why not use their lights this way you won’t have to drag that Bosch light around ☺️

    The reason I bought that Bosch light was because it was onsale for like $19.95 and I happen to have a Bosch battery that I have no tool to use it with. It is a good light but at the time I wasn’t thinking about crawlspace lighting and how weight of a 6.3ah battery would be a bit on the heavier side.

    I do have a die grinder but it’s an air tool, and I haven’t touched one in a while because of the compressor I need to run it with about the only thing I still do air tool wise are the nailers and I am getting out of that too.

    The M12 die grinder looks like this.

    So in some cases not only the length but the girth of the tool presents a challenge. For example, let say you have a piece of steel plate 1.25″ X 8″ long, and you need to cut a rectangular hole 3/4″ X 1″ in size right in the middle (like a dead bolt strike plate that I had to do a few days ago).

    With the M12 grinder, if you use a standard cut wheel which is 2″, you cannot use it to make a 3/4″ cut into the plate, not without completely cutting the plate into half. If you change it to a smaller wheel, the girth of the tool will prevent the smaller wheel from sinking into the plate unless you make the cut at a steep angle and overcut it excessively in the process. Even if you get the right angle die grinder you will have the same issue. On the other hand, the Dremel has a tapered body and could cut a smaller size edge with a small wheel, but if the body gets in the way, you can connect a flex shaft attachment which lowers the profile much further to allow you to use a 3/4″ or 1″ cut wheel to cut a slot that’s just barely over that in size. See the attached picture. This makes a big difference if you are dealing with flat stock, tubings etc…to fabricate to fit something that’s custom. Or if you are trying to cut a rusted flange nut/bolt for a skirted toilet bowl where the recess you try to cut in is surrounded by porcelain on all sides and you don’t want an accidental slippage.

    #740029
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    @miamicuse

    What’s the main use for it?
    Hobby or pro?

    I use it occasionally for the small cutting wheels. I don’t use any of those grinding stones, craving bits or whatever. But the small cutting wheels do help in some tight spots.

    For example, when removing a toilet most times the flange bolts are corroded and the nuts get seized and cannot be removed without being cut. A sawzall is too inefficient, an angle grinder could make the cut but may not have clearance to reach into the recessed contoured porcelain, and a single slip of hand will end up cracking the toilet. So I use a dremel with a small cutting wheel there. There are also times when the bowl to tank connection screws and nuts are corroded and seized, and to reach into the bottom of a tank to cut, a Dremel allows better control.

    Occasionally have to cut a copper pipe against say the back of a cabinet, except for a Dremel, most other tools (grinder, OMT, Sawzall) will leave a cut mark on the surface behind the pipe if the pipe is pulled tight against it and cannot easily be freed.

    Recently I had to relocate a junction box connected to a 1/2″ EMT conduit where the conduit is tight against the wall. I need to cut the conduit in the middle so I can slip on a 90 elbow WITHOUT cutting the electrical conductors inside. I was able to unscrew the EMT coupling upstream which allowed me to rotate the conduit in place, with a Dremel I quickly cut the conduit from one direction while slowing rotating the tubing and not damaging the wiring inside. A sawzall or OMT can’t do that with good control, a small quarter tubing cutter would work but needs 2″ all around to spin the tool and will create a inside pointing sharp flare that needs to be deburred.

    Yesterday I had to install an exterior dead bolt on a wrought iron metal gate so the bolt hole has to be custom cut into the 1/8″ metal tubing. That’s the hole for the actual bolt (not the lock). So the tubing is 1.5″ wide and I need to make a hole about 3/4″X1″. I used a Dremel there because it has the smallest cutting wheel that allows me to do it with the smallest amount of overcutting. So mostly it’s used for doing some stuff in tight space and making smallest cut possible.

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