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V-28.0 Toolaholic Public Announcement Page

Viewing 20 posts - 881 through 900 (of 1,008 total)
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  • #739982
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    #739983
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    New AmazonBasics “Heavy Duty” Auto-Loading Utility Knife

    https://toolguyd.com/amazonbasics-auto-loading-utility-knife/

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #740002
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Got a new Dremel to replace one that overheated. Don’t use it much but once in a while it’s the only tool that could get me out of a tight spot.

    #740008

    @Miamicuse congrats looks like a decent little kit. I like the case.

    #740013
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    #740017

    I really like engineers squares, so I ordered another small double square this one from iGaging.

    Will

    #740020
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    @miamicuse

    What’s the main use for it?
    Hobby or pro?

    #740022

    I really like engineers squares, so I ordered another small double square this one from iGaging.

    Congrats , I don’t think I’ve heard of that brand before. Looks well built , how expensive are they , and what place did you buy it from

    #740024
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    @boschmanbrian

    Renodepot carries the brand. Rona also.

    #740028

    @Sorpa thanks I’ll have to go by tonight.

    #740030
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    @Sorpa

    I use it occasionally for the small cutting wheels. I don’t use any of those grinding stones, craving bits or whatever. But the small cutting wheels do help in some tight spots.

    For example, when removing a toilet most times the flange bolts are corroded and the nuts get seized and cannot be removed without being cut. A sawzall is too inefficient, an angle grinder could make the cut but may not have clearance to reach into the recessed contoured porcelain, and a single slip of hand will end up cracking the toilet. So I use a dremel with a small cutting wheel there. There are also times when the bowl to tank connection screws and nuts are corroded and seized, and to reach into the bottom of a tank to cut, or go from the bottom reaching up to split a basin nut, a Dremel allows better control.

    Occasionally have to cut a copper pipe against say the back of a cabinet, except for a Dremel, most other tools (grinder, OMT, Sawzall) will leave a cut mark on the surface behind the pipe if the pipe is pulled tight against it and cannot easily be freed.

    Recently I had to relocate a junction box connected to a 1/2″ EMT conduit where the conduit is tight against the wall. I need to cut the conduit in the middle so I can slip on a 90 elbow WITHOUT cutting the electrical conductors inside. I was able to unscrew the EMT coupling upstream which allowed me to rotate the conduit in place, with a Dremel I quickly cut the conduit from one direction while slowing rotating the tubing and not damaging the wiring inside. A sawzall or OMT can’t do that with good control, a small quarter tubing cutter would work but needs 2″ all around to spin the tool and will create a inside pointing sharp flare that needs to be deburred.

    Yesterday I had to install an exterior dead bolt on a wrought iron metal gate so the bolt hole has to be custom cut into the 1/8″ metal tubing. That’s the hole for the actual bolt (not the lock). So the tubing is 1.5″ wide and I need to make a hole about 3/4″X1″. I used a Dremel there because it has the smallest cutting wheel that allows me to do it with the smallest amount of overcutting. So mostly it’s used for doing some stuff in tight space and making smallest cut possible.

    #740033
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    Thanks! Quite handy that little tool.
    How about a cordless die grinder? Wouldn’t be more useful?

    #740036
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Thanks! Quite handy that little tool.
    How about a cordless die grinder? Wouldn’t be more useful?

    I think it depends on the use cases. In my situation, it wouldn’t.

    I am on the Milwaukee 18V platform and the M18 die grinder is too bulky. It’s over 10″ long before you attach a battery then it will be 14″ long. With something so long and bulky you no longer have the hand control you need for delicate cutting. The Dremel I have is the length if a soda can, I can almost hold it like a pencil and that makes a big difference in close quarters. On top of that the M18 version is $200+ and it’s single speed, the small Dremel I have is $50 and variable speeds. A die grinder cutting wheel is still too large for some applications, like 2″ wheels. A Dremel can use a 3/4″ cut off wheel, so when I cut a custom hole for a lock strike plate I can’t use larger wheels. Die grinders have their applications which sometimes overlap with a Dremel, and then there is Rotozip.

    #740043
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    #740044
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    #740047

    @Miamicuse have you thought about adding the 12 volt Milwaukee , I think they have a 12 volt die grinder ? Also if you are on the 18 volt batteries why not use their lights this way you won’t have to drag that Bosch light around ☺️

    #740049
    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    I think it depends on the use cases. In my situation, it wouldn’t.

    I am on the Milwaukee 18V platform and the M18 die grinder is too bulky. It’s over 10″ long before you attach a battery then it will be 14″ long. With something so long and bulky you no longer have the hand control you need for delicate cutting. The Dremel I have is the length if a soda can, I can almost hold it like a pencil and that makes a big difference in close quarters. On top of that the M18 version is $200+ and it’s single speed, the small Dremel I have is $50 and variable speeds. A die grinder cutting wheel is still too large for some applications, like 2″ wheels. A Dremel can use a 3/4″ cut off wheel, so when I cut a custom hole for a lock strike plate I can’t use larger wheels. Die grinders have their applications which sometimes overlap with a Dremel, and then there is Rotozip.

    I have 18V Makita cordless die grinder I purchased last year. I bought it for 2 reasons. Too use as a die grinder and a rotary tool. I have 1/8 inch collet for it. So I can use rotary tool attachments.
    Might die grinder is 10 inches long without the battery and 12 inches with battery. It is alittle heavier then I would like. But it a small price not having deal with a cord.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #740057
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    @Boschmanbrian

    The reason I bought that Bosch light was because it was onsale for like $19.95 and I happen to have a Bosch battery that I have no tool to use it with. It is a good light but at the time I wasn’t thinking about crawlspace lighting and how weight of a 6.3ah battery would be a bit on the heavier side.

    I do have a die grinder but it’s an air tool, and I haven’t touched one in a while because of the compressor I need to run it with about the only thing I still do air tool wise are the nailers and I am getting out of that too.

    The M12 die grinder looks like this.

    So in some cases not only the length but the girth of the tool presents a challenge. For example, let say you have a piece of steel plate 1.25″ X 8″ long, and you need to cut a rectangular hole 3/4″ X 1″ in size right in the middle (like a dead bolt strike plate that I had to do a few days ago).

    With the M12 grinder, if you use a standard cut wheel which is 2″, you cannot use it to make a 3/4″ cut into the plate, not without completely cutting the plate into half. If you change it to a smaller wheel, the girth of the tool will prevent the smaller wheel from sinking into the plate unless you make the cut at a steep angle and overcut it excessively in the process. Even if you get the right angle die grinder you will have the same issue. On the other hand, the Dremel has a tapered body and could cut a smaller size edge with a small wheel, but if the body gets in the way, you can connect a flex shaft attachment which lowers the profile much further to allow you to use a 3/4″ or 1″ cut wheel to cut a slot that’s just barely over that in size. See the attached picture. This makes a big difference if you are dealing with flat stock, tubings etc…to fabricate to fit something that’s custom. Or if you are trying to cut a rusted flange nut/bolt for a skirted toilet bowl where the recess you try to cut in is surrounded by porcelain on all sides and you don’t want an accidental slippage.

    I think a die grinder is great and more powerful, but if you need to make small cuts requiring a low profile with good hand control, then the Dremel comes in handy. I don’t use it for anything else all those grinding craving polishing accessories I have never used them or have a need for it. I only use it for the small cutting wheel, and is the only one I can operate single handed if I need my second hand to do something else, such as trying to hit a mosquito or spider that’s bothering me LOL. My air die grinder needs a second hand to steady it.

    #740058
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    here is a picture of the flex shaft.

    The cord for a Dremel has never bothered me because all the times I use it is indoors where I have power. I am not on a ladder, on the roof or outside cutting a tree branch with it. So I would gladly trade the battery to gain the smaller weight and size to allow single hand control.

    #740059

    @Miamicuse I get that , makes sense , you use whatever is best for application ,
    LoL darn mosquitoes 😂

    That Dremel extend shaft looks good , we have those on some of the work benches in the shop. Practical for sure.

Viewing 20 posts - 881 through 900 (of 1,008 total)
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