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Using a lock miter bit

Viewing 11 posts - 61 through 71 (of 71 total)
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  • #670547
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I finally tried out my lock miter bit today. After finding a set up video, it was pretty easy really. I did burn through a pile of scraps dialing in the but height and fence depth, but it went quicker than I thought it would!

    I have looked at one of those for a while now but always hesitated because of setup fears. Good to know they work as promised. I will look forward to the final result.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #670550
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I finally tried out my lock miter bit today. After finding a set up video, it was pretty easy really. I did burn through a pile of scraps dialing in the but height and fence depth, but it went quicker than I thought it would!

    I have looked at one of those for a while now but always hesitated because of setup fears. Good to know they work as promised. I will look forward to the final result.

    I spent about 20 minutes dialing it in. Tomorrow, I’m going to make a set up block out of a piece of maple which should drop subsequent set ups to a minute or two.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #670558
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I finally tried out my lock miter bit today. After finding a set up video, it was pretty easy really. I did burn through a pile of scraps dialing in the but height and fence depth, but it went quicker than I thought it would!

    I have looked at one of those for a while now but always hesitated because of setup fears. Good to know they work as promised. I will look forward to the final result.

    I spent about 20 minutes dialing it in. Tomorrow, I’m going to make a set up block out of a piece of maple which should drop subsequent set ups to a minute or two.

    I know Infinity Tools sells a lock miter bit setup gizmo. They want stupid money for us Canadians to order one, and I’ve questioned also why one just couldn’t use a setup scrap to do just the same like you’re gonna do.

    #670577
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Im jealous. Last time I made a pile of columns out of Boral I wanted to make some lock miters but I azz out and ended up rabbiting laps.

    Post again. Are these bits restricted to table top units?

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #670696
    KeeganC
    Pro
    Bloomington, IN
    <a

    Post again. Are these bits restricted to table top units?

    Typically yes, but there’s always more than one way to skin a cat….. see video

    #670758
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.
    <a

    Post again. Are these bits restricted to table top units?

    Typically yes, but there’s always more than one way to skin a cat….. see video

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/j_1UyC_djDs?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; allow=”autoplay; encrypted-media” allowfullscreen=”” width=”770″ height=”433″ frameborder=”0″></iframe></figure>

    That looked like it worked very well.

    #670798
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    I looks like you need a strong router and a stable work surface. I could see the Festool track flexing a hair or human pressure wobbling in a bad place.
    I think this is a table table process. Still love it though.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #670816
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I looks like you need a strong router and a stable work surface. I could see the Festool track flexing a hair or human pressure wobbling in a bad place.
    I think this is a table table process. Still love it though.

    Agreed. Although it is technically possible, its not something I would attempt without a table! The bit itself is 2 1/2″ in diameter…think of the things that could go wrong.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #670855
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I looks like you need a strong router and a stable work surface. I could see the Festool track flexing a hair or human pressure wobbling in a bad place.
    I think this is a table table process. Still love it though.

    The lock miter joint is one of the more demanding executions for router work to do right. All he showed was he made a pass with his router and tried a small sample fit. I’m not sold he did it right either. He did slip and readjust in his rout, I wouldn’t be surprised that in reality a long piece does not line up properly.

    #670873
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Free handing any router with a big bit is scary.

    I am not a custom wood worker so to speak and at that point Im not working with routers regularly.
    Several years ago a discussion came up about beveling doors and using the electric plane sucked. So someone recommended a 1/2″ shank bit that beveled doors. OMG the chatter and chaos using it. Need at least 3hp

    I never used it again and now love my tracksaw!!!! for that

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #670899
    KeeganC
    Pro
    Bloomington, IN

    I looks like you need a strong router and a stable work surface. I could see the Festool track flexing a hair or human pressure wobbling in a bad place.
    I think this is a table table process. Still love it though.

    The lock miter joint is one of the more demanding executions for router work to do right. All he showed was he made a pass with his router and tried a small sample fit. I’m not sold he did it right either. He did slip and readjust in his rout, I wouldn’t be surprised that in reality a long piece does not line up properly.

    Ok guys, obviously one would prefer to run your pieces in a table for this bit. Someone asked a question, rather than just imagining that it could be done handheld, I provided a video of one/another way to get the job done. The reality of carpentry is that you don’t always have the ideal scenario. What makes a good carpenter is being able to adapt to the situation, think outside the box, problem solve. And if you do make a mistake, yet another aspect of the job is to figure out how to fix, hide, or disguise your blunder. Everyone will have different comfort levels with certain tools, if you don’t feel safe running a bit like that handheld, I’m not here to tell you to do otherwise, but I don’t understand how you can say that it can’t be done well. The only reason I remembered that video is from the “other forum”, that guy that posted that video does quality work from what I’ve seen and always has something valuable to add to conversations there. In other words, I have no reason to believe that the joint came out less than acceptable, in fact I’m pretty sure he posted pics of the finished product… if I remember correctly, which nobody in their right mind would do if it looked like crap…

Viewing 11 posts - 61 through 71 (of 71 total)
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