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Using a lock miter bit

Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 71 total)
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  • #470431
    Doobie
    Moderator

    When I finish my chairs, I’ll see if I can play around with lock miter bit.

    What are you planning on building with that kind of joint Mark?

    Probably nothing at this point, but I will play around with it and let you know what I think.

    On a router table I assume?

    #470447

    I was reading comments on another forum with a fellows plight in dealing with using his lock miter bit and the difficulties he was having. That is until he got this lock miter bit centering jig from Infinity Tools. A bit pricey for what it is, but there are a lot of satisfied users.

    http://www.infinitytools.com/2-Pc-Lock-Miter-Master-Jig-Set-For-3_8-1-3_16-Stock/productinfo/00-LMM/

    http://www.infinitytools.com/PDF/FWW_LMM%20Article.jpg

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/XwpRUASpZ30?start=83&feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>
    http://www.infinitytools.com/PDF/Lock%20Miter%20Master%20Manual.pdf

    Any Canadians ordering from them….watch out. Apparently it is brutal shipping costs for something so smallish.

    Wow, that makes a very nice joint,
    Looks very solid,
    I am late into this thread, but curious
    Is it one bit for different sizes, of different bit sizes for div thicknesses of wood / material

    #470465
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I am late into this thread, but curious
    Is it one bit for different sizes, of different bit sizes for div thicknesses of wood / material

    I’m not late but just found out the same bit does both sides.

    #470466
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I am late into this thread, but curious
    Is it one bit for different sizes, of different bit sizes for div thicknesses of wood / material

    There are different sizes of bits, but each one can handle a bit of range on what they are approprriate for. Bosch does make one that retails in the $100CDA range and is quite big. LV makes a couple of smaller ones.

    I have never used one myself, but I plan on using one sometime this year with 3/4 PVC.

    1/4 and 1/2 inch shank at LV.

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=30119&cat=1,46168,69435,46174

    8mm shank

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=69422&cat=1,46168,69399,69419

    Bosch lock miter bit that can handle a max depth of 1 3/16.

    https://www.boschtools.com/ca/en/boschtools-ocs/carbide-tipped-lock-miter-bit-22711-c/

    #470504

    That looks very cool, if I made more drawer boxes but I would be interested in redeeming for the Bosch one if it would work for 3/4 through ?? thickness of material.

    Will

    #470536
    Doobie
    Moderator

    That looks very cool, if I made more drawer boxes but I would be interested in redeeming for the Bosch one if it would work for 3/4 through ?? thickness of material.

    I would too if maybe I knew what thickness the center part that makes the deep narrow slot thickness is. I called Bosch, and I couldn’t get an answer the first time around, but today I called them and the guy I spoke to found a schematic/blueprint of the bit that he is not allowed to send to me, but could tell me the information I needed to know.

    The distance from the two red lines in the mitered joint below along the axis of the mitre joint is 9mm according to the Bosch tech I just spoke with.

    For using 3/4 inch thick wood, the diagonal is about 27.5 mm long, so that would leave about a quarter inch for the miter joint and about a quarter inch on both sides for the shoulders of the joint.

    That would seem fine by me. Kinda similar to the Domino rule of the thickness of the appropriate size of Domino for a joint should be about 1/3 the thickness of the boards you are mating.

    Has anybody inquired with Jim yet on how many points the Bosch 84508M Lock Miter Bit is? I now want to add one to my next redemption request.

    https://www.boschtools.com/ca/en/boschtools-ocs/carbide-tipped-lock-miter-bit-84508m-28065-p/

    #470544
    Doobie
    Moderator

    To add, this type of picture is what they should have for the Bosch bit. Clearly shows what size minimum you should consider this type of bit for albeit it’s for the Freud model lock miter bit listed in the photo.

    #470646
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    To add, this type of picture is what they should have for the Bosch bit. Clearly shows what size minimum you should consider this type of bit for albeit it’s for the Freud model lock miter bit listed in the photo.

    I completely agree. The Bosch site does a seriously poor job at listing the specs and pertinent information for router bits.

    That looks very cool, if I made more drawer boxes but I would be interested in redeeming for the Bosch one if it would work for 3/4 through ?? thickness of material.

    Has anybody inquired with Jim yet on how many points the Bosch 84508M Lock Miter Bit is? I now want to add one to my next redemption request.

    https://www.boschtools.com/ca/en/boschtools-ocs/carbide-tipped-lock-miter-bit-84508m-28065-p/

    Yes, a long while ago. I don’t think the email still exists, but the max point total for router bit is 45,500. If I recall, it was close to the top end.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #470652
    redwood
    Pro

    I’m pretty sure that you need one size bit for each thickness. A bit for 1″ stock will not work for 3/4″ or 1 1/4″ stock.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #470711
    yellaD
    Pro

    I’m pretty sure that you need one size bit for each thickness. A bit for 1″ stock will not work for 3/4″ or 1 1/4″ stock.

    I think a 1″ would work for 3/4″ but not 1 1/4″ according to the diagram posted by doobie.

    #470752
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I’m pretty sure that you need one size bit for each thickness. A bit for 1″ stock will not work for 3/4″ or 1 1/4″ stock.

    That does make it somewhat easier for aligning the vertical cut a lot easier, but from what I’ve seen looking around you have a range of play with using larger bits on narrower pieces.

    I’m no expert on this by any means. I don’t own a lock miter bit, nor have I ever used one, but I’m trying to do my homework on this before I go to use it on expensive PVC boards. The consensus is that while when successful they can give a beautiful joint that is very strong, they are one of the most challenging bits to successfully use.

    What I am picking up is that the vertically run piece is the trickier of the two to get right. That overpriced Infinity tool is looking like something I may just get after all. You’ve got to be spot on with this bit. There’s no real room for error.

    #470842
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I’m following this thread with more than a little interest. Looking for a simple, strong joint method for drawer boxes for shop drawers. I think the lock mitre will do the job nicely but the tricky setup is my concern.
    The Infinity jig looks like the solution but then the overall cost goes sky high.

    Lee valley offers a reversible door bit with instructions for setting the second part of the job using a jig made with the first profile.
    http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=30129&cat=1,33084,46168,69435,46178&ap=1 (Look at the instructions)
    I wonder if this concept would work with a lock miter bit. Seems like it would work. Any thoughts?

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #470863
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I’m following this thread with more than a little interest. Looking for a simple, strong joint method for drawer boxes for shop drawers. I think the lock mitre will do the job nicely but the tricky setup is my concern.
    The Infinity jig looks like the solution but then the overall cost goes sky high.

    For drawers, I would stay away from the complexity of the lock miter bit. Either butt joint the sides and pocket screw them or try a drawer lock bit…but a very similar joint can be achieved on the table saw without that bit too.

    http://www.rockler.com/freud-99-240-drawer-lock-bit-2-dia-x-33-64-h-x-1-2-sh

    IMO, the lock miter the should be reserved for long miters and exterior work due to the glue surface that you get with one.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #470868
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I’m following this thread with more than a little interest. Looking for a simple, strong joint method for drawer boxes for shop drawers. I think the lock mitre will do the job nicely but the tricky setup is my concern.
    The Infinity jig looks like the solution but then the overall cost goes sky high.

    For drawers, I would stay away from the complexity of the lock miter bit. Either butt joint the sides and pocket screw them or try a drawer lock bit…but a very similar joint can be achieved on the table saw without that bit too.

    http://www.rockler.com/freud-99-240-drawer-lock-bit-2-dia-x-33-64-h-x-1-2-sh

    IMO, the lock miter the should be reserved for long miters and exterior work due to the glue surface that you get with one.

    That makes sense, Jon, thanks.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #471020
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Lee valley offers a reversible door bit with instructions for setting the second part of the job using a jig made with the first profile.
    http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=30129&cat=1,33084,46168,69435,46178&ap=1 (Look at the instructions)
    I wonder if this concept would work with a lock miter bit. Seems like it would work. Any thoughts?

    The LV Reversable bit is dealing with two mating pieces on the same plane versus the LMB (lock miter bit) is basically going 3D more or less in complexity.

    Unlike most bit applications this bit needs very tight tolerances of aligning along two planes. The height must he perfectly centered to the stock, and the fence has to be set perfect also to where the vertically run mating piece will be run.

    People talk about thousandths of an inch inaccuracies causing failed work with this bit. Normally when I hear woodworkers talk in thousandths of an inch, I laugh. This bit’s setup is different. If anything is off in the X Y and Z axis, you will get scrap lumber/stock.

    Looking for a simple, strong joint method for drawer boxes for shop drawers. I think the lock mitre will do the job nicely but the tricky setup is my concern.

    In regards to using the LMB for drawers or boxes, really not ideal for that. Any cross grain cutting with this huge bit will be prone to tear out. I read lots of comments online in this regard. Unlike other bits where you can avoid that by taking multiple light passes and using a sacrificial end piece, this bit would not be used like that. Set it up, do test cuts with scrap, lock down you’re setup, and run all pieces in single passes for both the horizontally and vertically run pieces.

    .

    On another note someone alluded to earlier, forget any idea of hand held router use even with smaller versions of the LMB. While not totally impossible, you have what I would estimate is a 99.99% chance of failure imo.

    Even for router tables, this is where many will discover how non-perfect their router tables really are. The more I started to understand this bit and how it needs to be set up and what can go wrong, I think this is the most demanding bit insofar as setup I have ever seen. Buyer beware, especially when it comes to doing long stock cuts like I plan on using it for a steel post box wrap outside on our front porch using 3/4 PVC. Especially critical with PVC. With a slight imperfection, you may be able to get away with sanding the outside imperfect edge to be acceptable when using wood, but with PVC I don’t think you can get away with that. It’s spot on, or scrap.

    #473207
    Clev08
    Pro

    I’m pretty sure that you need one size bit for each thickness. A bit for 1″ stock will not work for 3/4″ or 1 1/4″ stock.

    That does make it somewhat easier for aligning the vertical cut a lot easier, but from what I’ve seen looking around you have a range of play with using larger bits on narrower pieces.

    I’m no expert on this by any means. I don’t own a lock miter bit, nor have I ever used one, but I’m trying to do my homework on this before I go to use it on expensive PVC boards. The consensus is that while when successful they can give a beautiful joint that is very strong, they are one of the most challenging bits to successfully use.

    What I am picking up is that the vertically run piece is the trickier of the two to get right. That overpriced Infinity tool is looking like something I may just get after all. You’ve got to be spot on with this bit. There’s no real room for error.

    I would probably go with the infinity bits too, routing the piece vertically with the lock miter seems like it would be way too difficult

    #670523
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Here it is!

    I finally tried out my lock miter bit today. After finding a set up video, it was pretty easy really. I did burn through a pile of scraps dialing in the but height and fence depth, but it went quicker than I thought it would!

    I’ll be employing this joint on some front porch columns soon. They are currently a round fiberglass, and the homeowner wants them squared off. The design is simple, but will require 4 sides of material to go around these posts wituab final width of about 8″ square.

    Because I don’t trust solid wood not to move (and create gaps) I’m likely going through use MDO….and will therefore need to hide the plywood layers on the cut edge. This is why I’m finally using the lock miter bit.

    Here’s the end result on a couple pieces of scrap 3/4″ birch.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #670537
    redwood
    Pro

    Way to go Jon, finally a actual real world test and it works with plywood.

    Silly me, I still haven’t even taken my bit out of the package.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #670538
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I’ll be employing this joint on some front porch columns soon. They are currently a round fiberglass, and the homeowner wants them squared off. The design is simple, but will require 4 sides of material to go around these posts wituab final width of about 8″ square.

    Because I don’t trust solid wood not to move (and create gaps) I’m likely going through use MDO….and will therefore need to hide the plywood layers on the cut edge.

    Why not use PVC. Is it just because of cost?

    #670542
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Way to go Jon, finally a actual real world test and it works with plywood.

    Silly me, I still haven’t even taken my bit out of the package.

    Mine sat for since this past Black Friday I believe…I wanted to try it out several times in the past, but since I picked up the Festool Domino, I had less of an actual Need for the bit!

    I’ll be employing this joint on some front porch columns soon. They are currently a round fiberglass, and the homeowner wants them squared off. The design is simple, but will require 4 sides of material to go around these posts wituab final width of about 8″ square.

    Because I don’t trust solid wood not to move (and create gaps) I’m likely going through use MDO….and will therefore need to hide the plywood layers on the cut edge.

    Why not use PVC. Is it just because of cost?

    PVC actually moves A LOT in trim applications, especially a post wrap. Any little deviation from a perfect box and there will be gaps. It may be fine with the lock miter set up, but I really don’t see it as being necessary.

    I just checked the cost of PVC and it would run about 4x that of the MDO!

    Additionally, the HO requested that I use wood.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

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