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Undercut commercial metal door

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  • #631433

    Just curious has anybody ever used a metal cutting saw with a carbide tip blade to cut a metal door? I have like 30 doors I need to remove half inch from the bottom reinsert you Channel and tack weld.
    I’ve never used the metal cutting saw your feedback please

    #631447
    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    Are you looking for corded or cordless? I guess that’s the first question

    #631502
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I would think either the corded or cordless metal cutting saw would work fine to trim down a hollow metal door. at an inch and three quarter, you may want the depth of the corded version.

    #631596
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    A table saw will do it too.

    #631601
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    A table saw will do it too.

    Not sure I would want all that metal fling in my face.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #631607
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    A table saw will do it too.

    Not sure I would want all that metal fling in my face.

    Wouldn’t want to risk lighting up any sawdust either.

    #631645
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    Almost all the doors that I cut I used a table saw. Wood or steel. Entry doors, side doors. For a few I used a circular saw. Yesterday I cut 4 oak doors with a circular saw, a solid aluminum straight edge and 2 clamps.

    #631658
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Almost all the doors that I cut I used a table saw. Wood or steel. Entry doors, side doors. For a few I used a circular saw. Yesterday I cut 4 oak doors with a circular saw, a solid aluminum straight edge and 2 clamps.

    There is a big difference in a steel commercial door and the doors found in homes.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #631660
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Steel commercial doors are typically 12 or 16 Ga doors, the steel entry door is about 24 gauge which is a big defference

    #631701

    I definitely would use a dedicated circular saw with the proper blade, especially for 30 doors, and if they are Comercial they are thicker steel.
    We use to cut 1 and a half inch wood slabs plated with steel on both sides,
    And about 9 to 12 foot lengths,
    Watch out for those flying chips,
    We also used cutting wax.

    #631708
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    ive just used a standard circ saw, make sure to either buy a metal cutting blade or a sharp carbide blade

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #631735
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    Steel commercial doors are typically 12 or 16 Ga doors, the steel entry door is about 24 gauge which is a big defference

    You’re right.
    Huge difference in thickness.
    Circular saw with a dedicated blade. Move slowly.

    #631755
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    If you have a regular need for this type of cutting I can highly recommend the Skil Metal Cutting circular saw I received one to demo and can say I was impressed with the saw. the chip catcher is great so you do not have flying shrapnel. It also moves fairly fast through material.

    #631904

    I have used my skill saw with a diablo ferrous metal blade with good results. Never on 30 doors though

    #631931
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Watch out for those flying chips,

    I can highly recommend the Skil Metal Cutting circular saw I received one to demo and can say I was impressed with the saw. the chip catcher is great so you do not have flying shrapnel. It also moves fairly fast through material.

    I think the Skil Metal cutting saw with a proper blade would be the way to go. The chip catcher will really come in handy.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #631946

    Watch out for those flying chips,

    I can highly recommend the Skil Metal Cutting circular saw I received one to demo and can say I was impressed with the saw. the chip catcher is great so you do not have flying shrapnel. It also moves fairly fast through material.

    I think the Skil Metal cutting saw with a proper blade would be the way to go. The chip catcher will really come in handy.

    Agreed. Run it against a clamped down edge and get a perfect line

    #631953

    After reading the posts it hit me that the face shield I use for turning on the lathe would be a good safety item when doing this. Here’s a pic.

    Attachments:
    #631959
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    safety glasses or a face shield would be a must, the Skil Metal cutting circular saw catches chips so well, Safety glasses would be about all that is necessary.

    #631962

    safety glasses or a face shield would be a must, the Skil Metal cutting circular saw catches chips so well, Safety glasses would be about all that is necessary.

    I have seen and heard great results from that saw,
    Wish we had them 20 years ago, we used a regular Milwaukee saw with a good blade, and wore all sorts of safety equipment, even then we still got little burns from the metal chips

    #631978
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    here is a thread on the saw. I have used mine quite a bit and have been really pleased. I will probably try the Bosch cordless version in the near future

    https://bethepro.com/forums/topic/review-bosch-csm180-metal-cutting-circular-saw/

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