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Trim Details

This topic contains 18 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  Doobie 10 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
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  • #658213

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    This came to my inbox today from Fine Home Building…got me thinking about alternative trim details/something out of the ordinary.

    There’s a guy on Instagram that posts thing like this almost daily (I’ll dig up a link this evening) ….some are awesome solutions and others are a bit too far from traditional for me.

    Thoughts on this one? What others do you guys implement?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #658217

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    This came to my inbox today from Fine Home Building…got me thinking about alternative trim details/something out of the ordinary.

    There’s a guy on Instagram that posts thing like this almost daily (I’ll dig up a link this evening) ….some are awesome solutions and others are a bit too far from traditional for me.

    Thoughts on this one? What others do you guys implement?

    I have used both methods shown. Preference for me is determined by the profile and the situation. Ending a base at the top of a step, I would use the lower illustration, for example. It leads the eye toward the step but it’s most effective when the profile is a bold one.

    A straight 45º cut runs the risk of being visible but cutting the profile at 45 and the base at 90 enables the joint to be concealed by the profile itself. More work to the detail but easier to finish.

    Attachments:

    https://www.instagram.com/woodiworkshop/

    #658261

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    A straight 45º cut runs the risk of being visible but cutting the profile at 45 and the base at 90 enables the joint to be concealed by the profile itself. More work to the detail but easier to finish.

    Great tip. Half the battle with trim is hiding cuts…this seems to do just that quite well.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #658265

    asevereid
    Pro
    Kamloops, BC

    I think it really will depend on the trim profile… Like one (for instance) that has a bead detail at, or near the top, would look better with a traditional mitered return. Whereas a more simple profile (like changes in bevel, depth, etc) could benefit from the 45°return.

    But, I digress, because all I’ve been using for the last year is damn flat stock… I’m sick of it!

    Lurking Hit and Run poster.

    #658268

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I think it really will depend on the trim profile… Like one (for instance) that has a bead detail at, or near the top, would look better with a traditional mitered return. Whereas a more simple profile (like changes in bevel, depth, etc) could benefit from the 45°return.

    But, I digress, because all I’ve been using for the last year is damn flat stock… I’m sick of it!

    We have been getting a lot of call for flat stock lately, Seems like it is the “IN” thing right now.

    #658313

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    We have been getting a lot of call for flat stock lately, Seems like it is the “IN” thing right now.
    Lumber yard has contemporary profiles with flat stock baseboard and a simple top bevel. Crowns too, very plain like beveled saw cuts.

    I dont like them at all. Modern I guess but no character

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #658315

    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    We have been getting a lot of call for flat stock lately, Seems like it is the “IN” thing right now.
    Lumber yard has contemporary profiles with flat stock baseboard and a simple top bevel. Crowns too, very plain like beveled saw cuts.

    I dont like them at all. Modern I guess but no character

    Alot of that is going on around here too. I’ve only seen one house where I actually liked it and that’s because it was a very modern style house and juat seemed to fit.

    #658342

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    Didn’t know that the ‘in’ thing was flat stock. Just to clarify, what is it? Is it simply trim with zilcho profile? Not even roundovers?

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

    #658354

    asevereid
    Pro
    Kamloops, BC

    Yep, no profile, with just a small round over, or eased edges.
    We switch out up by using an off the shelf architrave molding, but I wish we could spec out or have someone request something a bit more challenging.

    Lurking Hit and Run poster.

    #658355

    KeeganC
    Pro
    Bloomington, IN

    Funny to see the flat stock mentioned, I’m currently trimming out a house in just that. The casing is 3 1/4″ x 9/16″ fj poplar with a slight round over on both sides , base trim is 3 1/4″ x 7/16″ with the same round over on top. It’s stock from menards, they’re calling it mission casing, which doesn’t seem quite right in my mind…. but whatever, it’s easy to work with. The 1×6 with a bevel on top base is very common around here in the older 1910-1940’s homes, a timeless look in my opinion. As far as the base return to the floor, I’m on the fence about it, I don’t love it, but with some profiles it works ok, looks ok at the top of stairs as others mentioned, but I’ve always avoided it in favor of the mitered return

    #658363

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Great thread Jon, I think the in style is the flat modern style
    This is what I guess they did when they built our present home,
    And like Peter @smallerstick did, I have done both but for different applications.

    Don’t laugh, it’s all going to get fixed up and painted eventually.
    I still have not decided what to do in the last picture. Don’t know what they were thinking just stopping it like that

    #658496

    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    i know exactly who your refferring to about hte crazy trim details.. some of his stuff works some of it is just too much. i like the idea of turning baseboard vertical tthen back down to regualr height for spots like a toilet water line . i have used some of his methods recently but its very selective and some clients may not like something too busy

    as for flat stock… stop complaining about one year…. ive been doing it for about 7 years.. one out of every 5 jobs might get a actual molding lol

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #658499

    asevereid
    Pro
    Kamloops, BC

    Oh don’t get me wrong… I’ve been subject to flat stock for a few years now… I just wish that we’d spec something different. Often we’ll remove a profiled base and trim in a reno, but then replace with flat stock. It’s just the ‘go to’ for the builder I work for.
    Better than the alternative though.. As most folks around here don’t pick anything other than 2-1/4 colonial.
    On that note… 2-1/4 colonial does look good with a simple miter return.

    Lurking Hit and Run poster.

    #658500

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    as for flat stock… stop complaining about one year…. ive been doing it for about 7 years.. one out of every 5 jobs might get a actual molding lol

    Wow, I guess it makes the job a lot more simple when there is no profile to cope, huh? I would get seriously bored though!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #658564

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Funny to see the flat stock mentioned, I’m currently trimming out a house in just that.

    So am I. It is a common old Hawaiian look. We are using Winsor One trim wood.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #658645

    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    as for flat stock… stop complaining about one year…. ive been doing it for about 7 years.. one out of every 5 jobs might get a actual molding lol

    Wow, I guess it makes the job a lot more simple when there is no profile to cope, huh? I would get seriously bored though!

    oh im bored outta my skull most times.. if it werent for the most recent big remodel we completed i wouldnt have gotten to have any carpentry fun this year… keep in mind i was out of commission for the first 6 months of the year with the injury too

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #658650

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Funny to see the flat stock mentioned, I’m currently trimming out a house in just that. The casing is 3 1/4″ x 9/16″ fj poplar with a slight round over on both sides , base trim is 3 1/4″ x 7/16″ with the same round over on top. It’s stock from menards, they’re calling it mission casing, which doesn’t seem quite right in my mind…. but whatever, it’s easy to work with. The 1×6 with a bevel on top base is very common around here in the older 1910-1940’s homes, a timeless look in my opinion. As far as the base return to the floor, I’m on the fence about it, I don’t love it, but with some profiles it works ok, looks ok at the top of stairs as others mentioned, but I’ve always avoided it in favor of the mitered return

    We have been using similar stock, but not even Mitering the corners. Return the ends and run the bottom and top long. On some projects we have added a sill and top hat for the windows.

    #658658

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    I’m old school, I guess. I just don’t understand why a small, plain, square moulding is considered appropriate to finish a home. Curves are so gentle on the eye and add so much warmth to a room.

    https://www.instagram.com/woodiworkshop/

    #658664

    Doobie
    Pro
    Ajax, ON

    as for flat stock… stop complaining about one year…. ive been doing it for about 7 years.. one out of every 5 jobs might get a actual molding lol

    Wow, I guess it makes the job a lot more simple when there is no profile to cope?

    I thought that was oneof the reasons it is used at times. Save on costs with less labor and less expensive trim required to do the job.

    I’m old school, I guess. I just don’t understand why a small, plain, square moulding is considered appropriate to finish a home. Curves are so gentle on the eye and add so much warmth to a room.

    I agree.

    Kevin.

    Wannabee pro.

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