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Track saw accessories

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  • #117467
    CrpntrFeak
    Pro
    Globe, AZ

    I will never be without a track saw again. I picked up the Makita with the 55″ track on sale then found an 118″ track on sale. I was saving for the Festool but when the Makita went on sale I could not pass it up. WOW! What a game changer.

    One of the main reasons for me getting it is we do a lot of MDF shelving. Rip, cut, sand, router, sand, etc. Ripping that MDF with the track saw will save a ton of time. Gang ripping with edges that will not need sanding.

    As of right now I see no need for much more than the two tracks I have. So I will purchase some clamps but can definitely get by without till that time.

    #117491

    Lon, I guess if you have no problems manhandling sheet goods on the table saw

    I would cut big with a circular saw to break it down to a smaller size but not yet final size and then recut on the table saw. Not the most efficient method. More waste and time.

    One thing though. With a tracksaw, you can cut multiple sheets at a time, as well as easily cut tapers.

    You just made the winning closing argument. Thanks for the insights Mark. If I recall you have the Makita track saw. If so, how do you feel about it versus the Festool?

    #117496
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    I’m going to be working on a project soon that involves plywood mitred together and also cut on an angle to match the slope of a stair rail. I can’t think of a better tool than my tracksaw for that application, especially since it will be walnut plywood and needs to be bang on. I wondered just how much use I would get out of my Makita tracksaw when I bought it but I couldn’t imagine working without it now. So far I have no regrets for not going with the Festool, especially since the Makita was on sale and about $250 cheaper than the Festool.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #117498

    A track saw is a game changer. Even straight-line ripping solid wood is worth it — think about being able to cut boards to maximize grain and not having to joint after the cut as you would if using a band saw? Multiple sheets of ply or whatever with perfect cuts is another benefit. I might seriously look at Mafell’s saws too if you are in the market — at that level a few hundred dollars difference but from what I have read from experienced users of all the saws out there people tend to think the Mafell is the best one out there. I have used the DeWalt and it was good, but I prefer the bigger blade of my TS75 for solid wood. I have always found Festool’s 55 inch saw to be somewhat lacking in power — it is fine for sheet goods and lighter cuts in solid wood, but it just does not seem to have the oomph I look for in cutting — something I think that the Makita and certainly the Mafell would resolve. THis is not a knock on Festool’s 55 because it is a capable saw with lots and lots of great reviews…it is just not my saw of choice for the work I do. Oh, and dust collection is a HUGE benefit — no dust in the air, especially cutting MDF is worth it alone in my opinion.

    Orange County, CA

    #117499

    That is a great endorsement Dan. How is the chipout or lack there of with the Makita? It is my understanding the Festool is next to perfect in that regard. I will check out the Mafell Scott. Thanks guys for your wisdom.

    #117504

    Lon – I assume your question is directed to Makita owners — I do not have one so cannot comment. But, with Festool’s saws they have chipout protection on both sides of the cut — there is a green anti-splinter insert you use on the right of the blade for perfect cuts in sheet good on both sides of the cut.

    Orange County, CA

    #117510
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    That is a great endorsement Dan. How is the chipout or lack there of with the Makita? It is my understanding the Festool is next to perfect in that regard. I will check out the Mafell Scott. Thanks guys for your wisdom.

    Lon, the Makita will also give splinter free cuts even in melamine or fine veneer plywood. The trick with getting splinter free cuts on both sides of the kerf on the top side is doing a score cut first which cuts to a depth of 2mm. It’s just a matter of engaging a pin that stops at that depth and then disengaging it to make the full depth cut to whatever you’ve set it to be.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #117513

    One unique feature of the Mafell is that it has a scoring feature and allows you to cut once and then it moves the blade for a full cut.

    Orange County, CA

    #117532
    mattryyc
    Pro
    Calgary, Alberta

    Lon, the Makita will also give splinter free cuts even in melamine or fine veneer plywood. The trick with getting splinter free cuts on both sides of the kerf on the top side is doing a score cut first which cuts to a depth of 2mm. It’s just a matter of engaging a pin that stops at that depth and then disengaging it to make the full depth cut to whatever you’ve set it to be.

    Not knowing the Makita, I wonder if anyone has rigged out a spinterguard for the right side of the blade to cut out this step. I think it’s pretty good from what I’ve heard without it, I know in the head to head test it did as well as the Festool in a lot of places, and better for power overall than anyone else (Excluding maffel of course)

    #117552
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    Not knowing the Makita, I wonder if anyone has rigged out a spinterguard for the right side of the blade to cut out this step. I think it’s pretty good from what I’ve heard without it, I know in the head to head test it did as well as the Festool in a lot of places, and better for power overall than anyone else (Excluding maffel of course)

    The thought has crossed my mind before Matt. I don’t think it would be too hard to make a splinter guard out of wood that would eliminate the scoring cut. I have found sometimes that the score cut will be slightly off from the full depth cut in terms of lining up vertically. I haven’t narrowed down why it does that sometimes yet but it can be an issue sometimes depending on the type of cut. The score cut does work very well to give a clean cut though.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #117616
    redwood
    Pro

    I have the Makita and Festool TS75. I prefer the Festool for a couple of little things. Setting the depth is much easier on the Festool. The cord is longer on the Festool.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #117634

    I have the Makita and Festool TS75. I prefer the Festool for a couple of little things. Setting the depth is much easier on the Festool. The cord is longer on the Festool.

    I appreciate all the feedback guys. Sounds like the Festool TS75 is a better performer unless you go to the Maffel.

    #117698

    I do like the Plug-it cord of the Festool too — jsut leave one cord with the vac and all my other Festool tools with Plug-it cords work. That saves some time and hassle plugging and unplugging cords all the time.

    Orange County, CA

    #117712
    hdpro
    Pro
    Upstate, NY

    I have the Makita with (2) 55″ rails. I have no clamps. Never had the need for any. I built my own rail connectors out of some flat steel and set screws. I saw the idea on YouTube. It would have been easier just to pay the $30 something dollars, but I had the material and enjoyed the project. To me, it was therapeutic 🙂 !

    I was intrigued by watching Kent Whitten’s video for the cut table with stops for repeatable cuts. I’m rolling that marble around inside my noggin and thinking about how to combine that with the collapsable tables / horses being talked about in overanalyze’s discussion.

    Lots of good ideas here!

    And I do understand anyone who’s never used a track saw being skeptical. I was too. But I kept watching the guys discuss it over at CT. I got a chance to buy a gently used Makita kit off eBay for a steal of a deal. It was worth the risk for me. I liked it soooooo much that I got rid of my larger jobsite table saws and bought the Baby Bosch. As has been mentioned by Cali Decks many times here on BTP, the older I get, the name of the game becomes smaller and or wheeled tools! And I think Kent’s table for repeatable cuts would only make a great tool even greater!

    Thanks guys!

    #117870

    I was intrigued by watching Kent Whitten’s video for the cut table with stops for repeatable cuts. I’m rolling that marble around inside my noggin and thinking about how to combine that with the collapsable tables / horses being talked about in overanalyze’s discussion.

    That is a way cheaper way to imitate the mft/3 indeed!

    The guys who mentioned vacs being the #1 attachment are dead on. Even though my current vac is no CT (just a ridged), it is way nicer than not using one!

    John S

    #117878

    This whole thread is like Track Saw education 101. So next question, anything special about blades one should know?

    #117921

    I was intrigued by watching Kent Whitten’s video for the cut table with stops for repeatable cuts. I’m rolling that marble around inside my noggin and thinking about how to combine that with the collapsable tables / horses being talked about in overanalyze’s discussion.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”578″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/KsV3trdVA9U?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>
    That is a way cheaper way to imitate the mft/3 indeed!

    The guys who mentioned vacs being the #1 attachment are dead on. Even though my current vac is no CT (just a ridged), it is way nicer than not using one!

    Thanks for posting that John. I forgot about Kents table. @hdpro, could you take a full sheet of mdf and apply stops on the edge of the sheet instead of on top. That would give you the larger 49″ table that mdf comes in and would make it easier to slide in the full sheets of plywood. This could be setup like Kents with a perfect 90 degree stop for the track. This could just sit on top of my knockdown table when you needed it.

    Of course if I would just finish my design for my mft top, then parf dogs would be all you needed for square cuts.

    Man John….we did it again, slight thread derail..but it is still track saw related.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #117936

    Man John….we did it again, slight thread derail..but it is still track saw related.

    There isn’t some strict law here about derailing, but it is just generally nice to try to stay on topic

    John S

    #118016

    This whole thread is like Track Saw education 101. So next question, anything special about blades one should know?

    Festool offers lots of different blades for applications. I like the standard one that comes with the saw of the TS75 for most cuts. I bought one with more teeth for sheet goods and I have a Panther blade with fewer teeth for ripping hardwoods. With the 75 the kerfs are different with some of the blades so it could take a little more off the rubber strip on your rail. With the 55 they are all the same kerf. Also, if you have a need to cut mild steel the 75 has a blade for it too. They have blades for melamine and plastics as well. Lots of choices depending on what you need to cut. I think that the standard blade is adequate for most things, though.

    Orange County, CA

    #118025

    This whole thread is like Track Saw education 101. So next question, anything special about blades one should know?

    Like mentioned, it depends on what you will use it for. We have a composite/aluminum blade for when we are cutting ACM panels. We also have two plywood blades. I will be adding the lower tooth count for lumber ripping soon. We have and Oshlun brand, Festool Brand and a Tenryu. I don’t think any one is any better.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 615 total)
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