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Tool RANT of the Day….Aaaargh!

Viewing 20 posts - 901 through 920 (of 1,004 total)
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  • #719997
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    I have had my Senco compressor (1 gallon) and finish nailer for years and never really had much problem with it, but today I was installing trim and it just would NOT sink things all the way. And then it started jamming a ton. I thought it was just having a hard time with a higher quality MDF than I typically buy but then I finally realized that the cover on the front of the gun that you can remove if the pin jams was coming loose! I lazily tightened then all by hand and it worked great for a couple more nails and then started jamming again so I got my Alan wrenches our and did the job properly. I was super relieved to find that it was perfectly capable of sinking those 2” 18g nails after that – for a while I thought I was going to have to go get a new compressor!

    Charlie
    __________________

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    #720010
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I have had my Senco compressor (1 gallon) and finish nailer for years and never really had much problem with it, but today I was installing trim and it just would NOT sink things all the way.

    Glad it was an easy fix and you got back to work quickly.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #720029

    I have had my Senco compressor (1 gallon) and finish nailer for years and never really had much problem with it, but today I was installing trim and it just would NOT sink things all the way. And then it started jamming a ton. I thought it was just having a hard time with a higher quality MDF than I typically buy but then I finally realized that the cover on the front of the gun that you can remove if the pin jams was coming loose! I lazily tightened then all by hand and it worked great for a couple more nails and then started jamming again so I got my Alan wrenches our and did the job properly. I was super relieved to find that it was perfectly capable of sinking those 2” 18g nails after that – for a while I thought I was going to have to go get a new compressor!

    Good to hear you got it going.
    Do you ever add air tool oil in the nailer every once and a while.
    Keeps things moving
    A few drops in the airline intake of the tools , I usually used to do that at the end of the day , not to much or it will be shooting out all over from the tools air exhaust.

    #720034
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    I have had my Senco compressor (1 gallon) and finish nailer for years and never really had much problem with it, but today I was installing trim and it just would NOT sink things all the way. And then it started jamming a ton. I thought it was just having a hard time with a higher quality MDF than I typically buy but then I finally realized that the cover on the front of the gun that you can remove if the pin jams was coming loose! I lazily tightened then all by hand and it worked great for a couple more nails and then started jamming again so I got my Alan wrenches our and did the job properly. I was super relieved to find that it was perfectly capable of sinking those 2” 18g nails after that – for a while I thought I was going to have to go get a new compressor!

    Good to hear you got it going.
    Do you ever add air tool oil in the nailer every once and a while.
    Keeps things moving
    A few drops in the airline intake of the tools , I usually used to do that at the end of the day , not to much or it will be shooting out all over from the tools air exhaust.

    I do it every once in a while – this tool has gotten pretty intermittent use over the years and is only just starting to really get put through its paces. I didn’t oil yesterday though, so I probably will today. Good reminder Brian, thanks 🙂

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

    #720044

    I have had my Senco compressor (1 gallon) and finish nailer for years and never really had much problem with it, but today I was installing trim and it just would NOT sink things all the way. And then it started jamming a ton. I thought it was just having a hard time with a higher quality MDF than I typically buy but then I finally realized that the cover on the front of the gun that you can remove if the pin jams was coming loose! I lazily tightened then all by hand and it worked great for a couple more nails and then started jamming again so I got my Alan wrenches our and did the job properly. I was super relieved to find that it was perfectly capable of sinking those 2” 18g nails after that – for a while I thought I was going to have to go get a new compressor!

    Good to hear you got it going.
    Do you ever add air tool oil in the nailer every once and a while.
    Keeps things moving
    A few drops in the airline intake of the tools , I usually used to do that at the end of the day , not to much or it will be shooting out all over from the tools air exhaust.

    I do it every once in a while – this tool has gotten pretty intermittent use over the years and is only just starting to really get put through its paces. I didn’t oil yesterday though, so I probably will today. Good reminder Brian, thanks 🙂

    Oh well at least you got it working now and the job finished
    What brand of nails are you using

    #720081
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    I have had my Senco compressor (1 gallon) and finish nailer for years and never really had much problem with it, but today I was installing trim and it just would NOT sink things all the way. And then it started jamming a ton. I thought it was just having a hard time with a higher quality MDF than I typically buy but then I finally realized that the cover on the front of the gun that you can remove if the pin jams was coming loose! I lazily tightened then all by hand and it worked great for a couple more nails and then started jamming again so I got my Alan wrenches our and did the job properly. I was super relieved to find that it was perfectly capable of sinking those 2” 18g nails after that – for a while I thought I was going to have to go get a new compressor!

    Good to see you got that problem resolved. Sounds like you might a need a new nail gun then air compressor.

    A few drops in the airline intake of the tools , I usually used to do that at the end of the day , not to much or it will be shooting out all over from the tools air exhaust.

    This is a good tip.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #720093
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    I have had my Senco compressor (1 gallon) and finish nailer for years and never really had much problem with it, but today I was installing trim and it just would NOT sink things all the way. And then it started jamming a ton. I thought it was just having a hard time with a higher quality MDF than I typically buy but then I finally realized that the cover on the front of the gun that you can remove if the pin jams was coming loose! I lazily tightened then all by hand and it worked great for a couple more nails and then started jamming again so I got my Alan wrenches our and did the job properly. I was super relieved to find that it was perfectly capable of sinking those 2” 18g nails after that – for a while I thought I was going to have to go get a new compressor!

    Good to hear you got it going.
    Do you ever add air tool oil in the nailer every once and a while.
    Keeps things moving
    A few drops in the airline intake of the tools , I usually used to do that at the end of the day , not to much or it will be shooting out all over from the tools air exhaust.

    I do it every once in a while – this tool has gotten pretty intermittent use over the years and is only just starting to really get put through its paces. I didn’t oil yesterday though, so I probably will today. Good reminder Brian, thanks

    Oh well at least you got it working now and the job finished
    What brand of nails are you using

    Well, I completely forgot to oil it today – didn’t think about it till I hopped back on here, lol. But it’s working perfectly now that all the screws are tightened. I’ll oil it tomorrow when I put it away (hopefully)

    I’m using 2” Bostich nails I got years ago. I’m only just starting to go through the pack of 5000 I bought, but if I keep installing trim like this I’ll actually use it up.

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

    #720153
    Doobie
    Moderator

    A few drops in the airline intake of the tools , I usually used to do that at the end of the day , not to much or it will be shooting out all over from the tools air exhaust.

    Doesn’t it gum up the insides if the tool doesn’t get used for an extended period. I’ve always just oiled at the start of using an air tool.

    #720158
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I have had my Senco compressor (1 gallon)

    I like to carry a bigger compressor for blowing air and running a framing gun if needed at the same job.

    #720165

    A few drops in the airline intake of the tools , I usually used to do that at the end of the day , not to much or it will be shooting out all over from the tools air exhaust.

    Doesn’t it gum up the insides if the tool doesn’t get used for an extended period. I’ve always just oiled at the start of using an air tool.

    That’s a good question , I’m talking about our daily use prior to getting more into the cordless tools for the shop/plant
    We used them daily drills , die grinders , corner drill, jigsaw , air riveting gun’s
    Body saws (small recip saw)

    #720202
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    A few drops in the airline intake of the tools , I usually used to do that at the end of the day , not to much or it will be shooting out all over from the tools air exhaust.

    Doesn’t it gum up the insides if the tool doesn’t get used for an extended period. I’ve always just oiled at the start of using an air tool.

    That’s a good question , I’m talking about our daily use prior to getting more into the cordless tools for the shop/plant
    We used them daily drills , die grinders , corner drill, jigsaw , air riveting gun’s
    Body saws (small recip saw)

    Well, no worries if it does – I still haven’t oiled it, lol! But that’s a good point. My dad always told me to oil guns at the start of the day when we were framing our house, so next time I guess.

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

    #720209
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    A few drops in the airline intake of the tools , I usually used to do that at the end of the day , not to much or it will be shooting out all over from the tools air exhaust.

    Doesn’t it gum up the insides if the tool doesn’t get used for an extended period. I’ve always just oiled at the start of using an air tool.

    That’s a good question , I’m talking about our daily use prior to getting more into the cordless tools for the shop/plant
    We used them daily drills , die grinders , corner drill, jigsaw , air riveting gun’s
    Body saws (small recip saw)

    Well, no worries if it does – I still haven’t oiled it, lol! But that’s a good point. My dad always told me to oil guns at the start of the day when we were framing our house, so next time I guess.

    Based on my experience with air tools of all kinds, oiling is never an option. There has always been discussion about oiling before or after use. There is no clear answer which is best but no one ever said you have to choose. When in doubt, do both.

    If a tool is going to be left unused for any length of time, oil it, run it briefly to distribute the oil, then store it. Air tool oil does not gum up. There are no additives in it to cause gumming. Don’t use 3 in 1 or anything like that in air tools. Corrosion can occur inside tools stored without oiling resulting in expensive repairs. Most shops running production air tools use inline oilers to keep repairs down. The exception would be sanders in body shops or furniture shops where excess oil in the exhaust air can cause finishing problems.

    OK,, I’ll stop there. Best case, oil before and after use.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #720233

    A few drops in the airline intake of the tools , I usually used to do that at the end of the day , not to much or it will be shooting out all over from the tools air exhaust.

    Doesn’t it gum up the insides if the tool doesn’t get used for an extended period. I’ve always just oiled at the start of using an air tool.

    That’s a good question , I’m talking about our daily use prior to getting more into the cordless tools for the shop/plant
    We used them daily drills , die grinders , corner drill, jigsaw , air riveting gun’s
    Body saws (small recip saw)

    Well, no worries if it does – I still haven’t oiled it, lol! But that’s a good point. My dad always told me to oil guns at the start of the day when we were framing our house, so next time I guess.

    Based on my experience with air tools of all kinds, oiling is never an option. There has always been discussion about oiling before or after use. There is no clear answer which is best but no one ever said you have to choose. When in doubt, do both.

    If a tool is going to be left unused for any length of time, oil it, run it briefly to distribute the oil, then store it. Air tool oil does not gum up. There are no additives in it to cause gumming. Don’t use 3 in 1 or anything like that in air tools. Corrosion can occur inside tools stored without oiling resulting in expensive repairs. Most shops running production air tools use inline oilers to keep repairs down. The exception would be sanders in body shops or furniture shops where excess oil in the exhaust air can cause finishing problems.

    OK,, I’ll stop there. Best case, oil before and after use.

    That’s a good point Peter
    You are right about the bigger shops having a inline oilers, we’ve always had them

    Please don’t stop , your experience is always appreciated 👍👌

    #720278
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Based on my experience with air tools of all kinds, oiling is never an option. There has always been discussion about oiling before or after use. There is no clear answer which is best but no one ever said you have to choose. When in doubt, do both.

    If a tool is going to be left unused for any length of time, oil it, run it briefly to distribute the oil, then store it. Air tool oil does not gum up. There are no additives in it to cause gumming. Don’t use 3 in 1 or anything like that in air tools. Corrosion can occur inside tools stored without oiling resulting in expensive repairs. Most shops running production air tools use inline oilers to keep repairs down. The exception would be sanders in body shops or furniture shops where excess oil in the exhaust air can cause finishing problems.

    OK,, I’ll stop there. Best case, oil before and after use.

    Thanks Peter this is useful information. I guess I need to put oil in my air tools. As they don’t get used very much.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #720287
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    Most shops running production air tools use inline oilers to keep repairs down.

    Ha ! We had oilers, but only for some of the large machine tools that required air for certain functions. We also had moisture traps. Would have been great if the guy responsible for maintenance upkeep would have done his job. When/if he did refill the oilers he would just dump in any oil that was handy without cleaning the resevoir.As if that wasn’t bad enough, the moisture traps would bypass if they weren’t emptied after reaching a certain level which would feed water through the oilers and snot on to the machine. Of course the machines didn’t like that and your’s truly was the guy called on to figure out why things didn’t work and fix them. My rant could continue but I’ll also stop there.

    #720294
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Would have been great if the guy responsible for maintenance upkeep would have done his job.

    Bottom line all the maintenance tools and automatic oilers etc aren’t going to work if the human in charge does not do his job.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #720307
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Most shops running production air tools use inline oilers to keep repairs down.

    Ha ! We had oilers, but only for some of the large machine tools that required air for certain functions. We also had moisture traps. Would have been great if the guy responsible for maintenance upkeep would have done his job. When/if he did refill the oilers he would just dump in any oil that was handy without cleaning the resevoir.As if that wasn’t bad enough, the moisture traps would bypass if they weren’t emptied after reaching a certain level which would feed water through the oilers and snot on to the machine. Of course the machines didn’t like that and your’s truly was the guy called on to figure out why things didn’t work and fix them. My rant could continue but I’ll also stop there.

    This makes me wonder if we oiliers where I use to work. Most dept’s. use pneumatic impacts to remove parts from fixtures. We did have guy go around look after the equipment.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #720313
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Most shops running production air tools use inline oilers to keep repairs down.

    Ha ! We had oilers, but only for some of the large machine tools that required air for certain functions. We also had moisture traps. Would have been great if the guy responsible for maintenance upkeep would have done his job. When/if he did refill the oilers he would just dump in any oil that was handy without cleaning the resevoir.As if that wasn’t bad enough, the moisture traps would bypass if they weren’t emptied after reaching a certain level which would feed water through the oilers and snot on to the machine. Of course the machines didn’t like that and your’s truly was the guy called on to figure out why things didn’t work and fix them. My rant could continue but I’ll also stop there.

    Of course, you are absolutely right, the use of moisture traps and oilers is only as good as the level of service they get. Having said that, there are moisture traps with automatic drains, there are oilers with auto shutoff when they are empty but they all cost more.

    All of the best intentions are useless if the equipment is not serviced regularly or properly if at all. It’s not idiot proof.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #720323

    Most shops running production air tools use inline oilers to keep repairs down.

    Ha ! We had oilers, but only for some of the large machine tools that required air for certain functions. We also had moisture traps. Would have been great if the guy responsible for maintenance upkeep would have done his job. When/if he did refill the oilers he would just dump in any oil that was handy without cleaning the resevoir.As if that wasn’t bad enough, the moisture traps would bypass if they weren’t emptied after reaching a certain level which would feed water through the oilers and snot on to the machine. Of course the machines didn’t like that and your’s truly was the guy called on to figure out why things didn’t work and fix them. My rant could continue but I’ll also stop there.

    No man , that’s what we are here for , listening and learning , rant on Bud

    That’s is so true about the maintenance though.

    #720380

    Depending on how much use a nail gun has on it, you can easily give it a tune up.
    Most pneumatic nailers are simple to swap out o-rings and seals. Generally they will sell complete kits for the entire tool.
    Some manufacturers will glob some grease in the tool during assembly. Half or more of the grease usually ends up in some corner wasting space. Clear that crud out.
    You are going to need to re-grease the new o-rings, so make sure your kit comes with some new grease.
    It’s worth checking out the driver blade. Tips of driver blades can become worn uneven. A gentle filing back to a flat surface can help to prevent the driver blade from sliding off the nail and not seating the nail flush.
    The bumper, doughnut looking rubber piece that the piston slams into on the way down, can also wear out. A worn bumper can cause the piston and driver blade to fire deeper into the work piece, which then can lead to premature driver blade wear or failure.
    If you take off the nail magazine, pay close attention to the nail channel as the nails enter into the nose. Small pieces of nail or nail collation can get into the channel and not allow nails into the nose properly.
    Pull back the nail follower and make sure it slides smoothly as it pushes the nails along. Clean out the track the follower rides on so you always get a smooth force on the nails moving forward.
    Unless you are really rough on your tools, a nailer will last forever with just some basic maintenance.

    Sorry my power tool nerd flag out, I’ll put it away now….

    Dadgineer
    Project Leader - Bosch Power Tools North America

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