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Tongue and Groove/Linoleum/ Hardwood

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  • #424115
    jim_hunt17
    Pro
    Milwaukee, WI

    I am considering re-doing my kitchen and hallway floor. I stated pulling some of the tongue and groove out of the hallway this morning. I pulled it apart carefully so I could put it back because I didnt know what was under it.
    I removed the hallway and found the original hardwood flooring underneath it, just darker than the original floors in the house. (This is what I expected)

    I got to the transition between the hallway and the kitchen. I lifted a piece of the tongue and groove up and could see a layer of linoleum glued to the original hardwood.
    I really want to get the kitchen and hallway matching the rest of the house. I understand the process of sanding and staining the wood floors to match just unsure if it is possible with the linoleum glued to it.

    Any advice on how to proceed? Is it possible to get the linoleum up without wrecking havoc on the wood floor? What are some of the methods to do this?

    Jim H.
    Milwaukee, WI

    #424123
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I doubt the linoleum and adhesive come up without some kind of scraping/ sanding combination. Depending on the thickness of the hard wood, you’ll need to sand beyond any damage caused by removing the linoleum…that right there will tell you if it’s worth it to proceed or if something else needs to happen.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #424124
    TimelessQuality
    Pro
    Central America, (Kansas)

    Depending on the age, it may have already failed, and make removal somewhat easy.

    Just be careful.. If the glue is black, chances are it’s asbestos cutback glue

    --Steve

    #424127
    jim_hunt17
    Pro
    Milwaukee, WI

    I doubt the linoleum and adhesive come up without some kind of scraping/ sanding combination. Depending on the thickness of the hard wood, you’ll need to sand beyond any damage caused by removing the linoleum…that right there will tell you if it’s worth it to proceed or if something else needs to happen.

    I know this is going to be a lot of work and a huge mess. Scraping for surely involved, was just wondering if using a heat gun or some kind of chemical will make it easier to get the glue off and save the wood a little bit. I did find a website that said to pour hot water on the glue and then scrape. That doesnt seem like a very good idea to pour hot water onto the wood floor. I can only imagine what that would do to the wood.

    Jim H.
    Milwaukee, WI

    #424128
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Depending on the age, it may have already failed, and make removal somewhat easy.

    Just be careful.. If the glue is black, chances are it’s asbestos cutback glue

    Also the possibility of asbestos in the linoleum tile depending on when it was put down. you can always take a small piece and have it tested, just to be sure.

    EDIT:: I would not use the hot water to remove, it could ruin the hardwood.

    A heat gun is a possibility.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #424133
    jim_hunt17
    Pro
    Milwaukee, WI

    Depending on the age, it may have already failed, and make removal somewhat easy.

    Just be careful.. If the glue is black, chances are it’s asbestos cutback glue

    Also the possibility of asbestos in the linoleum tile depending on when it was put down. you can always take a small piece and have it tested, just to be sure.

    EDIT:: I would not use the hot water to remove, it could ruin the hardwood.

    A heat gun is a possibility.

    There may well be asbestos in the floor, I am not sure what to do with my one year old in the house. I may have to send him and mom on a weekend getaway when I do this. I am just concerned that this is going to turn into a huge mess and turn into a money pit. We plan on moving sometime in the next two years and this floor is the last eye sore in the house. Decisions decisions.

    Jim H.
    Milwaukee, WI

    #424137
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I’m surprised there was no underlayment under the vinyl.
    My niece had hardwood in her house and had to move in right away.
    We priced refinishing and found it was much cheaper and faster to put laminate down. Looks just like a hardwood floor and much better looking than the real wood floor. She didn’t have glue to scrape either!
    I like the looks of the vinyl planks also but haven’t had a chance to try them yet. They sure look easy to do.
    Like you say… decisions!

    #424148
    redwood
    Pro

    A heat gun most likely will soften the glue, but you still have to scrape and sand.

    A decent laminate floor is fairly inexpensive, easy to install and can go over the linoleum. The better types are almost indistinguishable from to real stuff.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #424149
    jim_hunt17
    Pro
    Milwaukee, WI

    I’m surprised there was no underlayment under the vinyl.
    My niece had hardwood in her house and had to move in right away.
    We priced refinishing and found it was much cheaper and faster to put laminate down. Looks just like a hardwood floor and much better looking than the real wood floor. She didn’t have glue to scrape either!
    I like the looks of the vinyl planks also but haven’t had a chance to try them yet. They sure look easy to do.
    Like you say… decisions!

    I think that is the way I might go. Just pull up the tongue and groove and put laminate down over the old linoleum. Probably put some sort of padding down underneath the laminate?

    Jim H.
    Milwaukee, WI

    #424151

    I had the same issue

    Was a pain, but I got up all the staples and went to town with a scrap handplane. Had to remove the blade to de-gunk often but it worked well

    The sections I pulled up to replace went through the thickness planer instead. Made good salvage and didnt lose much thickness

    #424180
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I really like the laminate idea as well since you will be moving in 2 years that would be the way to go.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #424182
    jim_hunt17
    Pro
    Milwaukee, WI

    I got some pictures for you guys to see. I am pretty sure I am going to leave the linoleum alone and just cover it up. You can see in the picture the blueish green stuff. It is rock hard and not going to come up easy.
    My wife wants tile instead of a laminate wood look. Not sure if I could lay tile over the linoleum and have it look right.

    Jim H.
    Milwaukee, WI

    #424195
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Oh man no way I’d try to pull that up and save the wood, Definitely cover over it with whatever.

    #424200
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    Some of the laminate flooring has the pad already on each piece and is much easier to do. When you go to buy it compare the cost between that and buying pad and laminate. I also like the click together kind much better than the tap together kind.

    #424206
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    Tagged for interest. We are also looking at replacing some kitchen flooring in our temporary house. We have been looking at lino alternatives (luxury vinyl, vinyl tiles etc) as it seems easier to do.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #424210
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I just put down some vinyl with a tile look in my entrance hall. I would have preferred ceramic but several factors were against me. Bottom line I’m happy with the vinyl. quarter round isn’t in yet.
    For a two year investment this may work for you.

    EDIT sorry for the poor photography

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #424248

    If you have the time and the skill, I am like you and prefer to maintain, restore and utilise real hardwood, not always the most economical option but there is some satisfaction in keeping the character.

    W

    Will

    #424250
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    @smallerstick That looks pretty good. Did you grout it?

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #424275
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    @smallerstick That looks pretty good. Did you grout it?

    That’s just the way it comes … seamless vinyl sheet, finished in an afternoon.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #424281
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @smallerstick That looks pretty good. Did you grout it?

    That’s just the way it comes … seamless vinyl sheet, finished in an afternoon.

    @smallerstick I thought you grouted it too. That looks really nice, and I like the color.

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