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Titebond wood glue shootout

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  • #484160
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    So last Friday was a slow day at work and I had a couple scraps laying around and I wanted to see if there are any differences between the 4 types of glue we use a lot and I mise well share my results with everyone. I used a piece of poplar 1×6 and put a simple 45 miter on them put plenty of glue on them then put three miter clamps on each one. No nails or any type of mechanical fasteners. I let them sit over the whole weekend.

    The titebond shootout results. They all passed under normal circumstances. I couldn’t get any of the joints apart at all with my hands, Although it didn’t pull the no run no drip apart with my hands it seems like I couldv almost pulled that one apart. Then I even put them all on the ground and jumped on them and none of them came apart. It wasn’t until I hit them with a hammer they came apart. So as long as you use plenty of glue and they are tight together they won’t fail under normal circumstances. You don’t have to worry about one being stronger than the other. If you need waterproof use 3 or if you need no runs use the no run no drip. But if you are using it inside there isn’t a reason why the original won’t be just as good as the others. This will save you money no need to spend extra money on the more expensive 3 of you don’t need the waterproofing. I would like to do another test in the future that is more scientific that uses a vise and a torque wrench to see how much pressure the joint can take.
    As far as other differences besides strength Original and 2 are super similar as far as consistency, tact, how much they run, and set time. The 3 is a lot more runny and thiner and takes longer to set. And the no run no drip is thicker and does what it says the initial tact is good and it dries faster.

    #484167
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Very simple, effective test, Austin. Thanks for taking the time to do that. Sure does take the guesswork out of making the choice, doesn’t it.

    BE the change you want to see.
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    #484169

    Thanks Austin.

    Most PVA glues will give you a long grained glue joint stronger than the wood itself. I have been wanting to try hide glue as there are things that are centuries old still stuck together with that stuff. I don’t want to get into the mess of a glue pot and shelf life so I have been thinking of trying the bottled titebond liquid hide glue.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

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    #484171
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    If you need waterproof use 3 or if you need no runs use the no run no drip. But if you are using it inside there isn’t a reason why the original won’t be just as good as the others. This will save you money no need to spend extra money on the more expensive 3 of you don’t need the waterproofing.

    Austin,
    ThanX for putting the different Titebond’s to the test. Good to know that it really doesn’t matter which you use aside from needing waterproofing.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #484173
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    thanks for doing the test, i generally use the titebond 1 for regular work and titebond 3 for outdoor waterproof or cutting boards as it is food safe.

    #484187

    Letting glue set really is the most important part . Thanks for sharing with us .

    Always willing to learn .

    #484192
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Nice Austin. I think I’ve seen something like this before that also included epoxy, brown and hide glue. It’s good to know that you Don’t always need the “super strong super expensive” glues they sell.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #484228

    @Austin thanks for taking the time to come up with a nice little test , I will be going to get some this weekend ,

    #484232
    redwood
    Pro

    Thanks Austin,

    When the samples broke, were they clean breaks or did the wood itself splinter off. I was under the assumption that the glue bonds were usually greater then the wood itself.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #484254
    keko
    Pro

    thanks for testing we use them all and now we know they are all good thanks again.

    #484261
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    @redwood the glue bonds broke no wood came with the miters. I was actually surprised by this thinking that i Have always heard that the joint is stronger than the wood. I think in some applications it is, like if you were to glue the faces together with the grain running parallel I would almost guarantee that the wood would splinter and the actual joint would be in tact. I say this becuase that has happened to me before, not in a controlled test though. But the way the grain runs together in a miter joint the wood is stronger than the glue in this case.

    #484326
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I have tested the glue myself and found the glue joint fails before the wood too. This could depend on the direction the wood grain is running too.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #484360
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    I have tested the glue myself and found the glue joint fails before the wood too. This could depend on the direction the wood grain is running too.

    Direction of the grain makes a big difference. Most of the door panels I have glued together( grain running same direction) have always broken away from the glue joint at least a little. Where crown will break at the joint most every time.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #484544
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I have tested the glue myself and found the glue joint fails before the wood too. This could depend on the direction the wood grain is running too.

    Direction of the grain makes a big difference. Most of the door panels I have glued together( grain running same direction) have always broken away from the glue joint at least a little. Where crown will break at the joint most every time.

    That’s just an end grain thing. The glue simply doesn’t adhere the same way and fails before the wood splinters. Miners aren’t something I use for strength, so an adequate glue joint is good enough. It doesn’t have to be a stellar bond in that case.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #484620
    Clev08
    Pro

    @jponto07 said it, “end grain” the glue simply does not penetrate as well into the end of a board as it does the face. If we need a really strong joint in casing we will often put a biscuit in it.

    #484676
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    The titebond shootout results.

    Thank you Austin I always wondered if there was a noticeable difference in strength.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #484701
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    No problem yall. Like I said I want to do another test more scientific about when the joints fail maybe when I do I will post up before and if there are any glues you guys want tested I can do those

    #484745
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    Here is another test with different glues.

    #484752

    I use 3 for cutting boards but I wonder why though??? The board isn’t going into water or absorbing any moisture because if it does than it’ll crack. So I wonder if 2 is a better option & less expensive as well, but using 3 is peace of mind.

    #484759
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    I use 3 for cutting boards but I wonder why though??? The board isn’t going into water or absorbing any moisture because if it does than it’ll crack. So I wonder if 2 is a better option & less expensive as well, but using 3 is peace of mind.

    The titebond webpage does say “Titebond III Ultimate Wood Glue and Titebond II Premium Wood Glue have both been approved for indirect food contact. For this reason, it is the glue that we recommend for making cutting boards.”

    so 2 or 3 would be perfectly fine to use. I personally use 3 as you say for peace of mind, I don’t want anyone coming back to me asking me to fix their board that broke apart.

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