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Tips for working alone

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 31 total)
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  • #158736

    I can’t seem to find a thread on this, though it I think I recall us talking some about this. I found a recent one at the FOG and found some decent tips there. Anyone have good tips for working alone?

    http://festoolownersgroup.com/home-improvement-other-projects/working-alone-tips-to-maybe-make-your-things-easier/?all

    What is the best way to get a sheet of ply onto your sawhorses (insight here may save me from future scars and stitches haha)

    John S

    #158742
    jaydee
    Pro
    Spencer, Ma., happy 2015

    find someone strong enough to lift a sheet of plywood.

    NOTE to self: BUY work gloves and band aids.

    #158752
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    I feel like I can accomplish alot more by my self than supervising another person regardless of skill.

    Number one tip….NEVER WASTE A TRIP up stairs or to the truck or up a ladder.

    Number 2 get some of the brainless things out of the way early so you dont feel like there is still alot to do while fussy with the tougher parts. Why add stress

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #158772

    find someone strong enough to lift a sheet of plywood.

    NOTE to self: BUY work gloves and band aids.

    Lol I am strong enough but it was riddled with nails – I had hammered them all pretty flat, but it was awkward to hold

    John S

    #158780
    Dustincoc
    Pro
    Madrid, NY

    I haven’t finished reading that thread but I’m going to saw #1 is to have a good radio… No sense letting the silence drive you crazy…

    Shop Blog: http://ravenbarsrepair.tumblr.com/
    Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCz498FKw9LF1awJsKIqhoxQ

    #158783
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    I don’t know how much it would it help you since it mainly deals with building but this is a great book for those that work alone:
    http://www.amazon.com/Working-Alone-Tips-Techniques-Building/dp/1561585459

    I will second the “no wasted trip”. I stress this with my helper – there is always something that needs put away, thrown away, etc.

    Do t be afraid to use tools to help, these make carrying sheet goods easy
    http://www.amazon.com/Stanley-93-301-14-Inch-Yellow-Handle/dp/B00004UDN8/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1404871048&sr=8-12&keywords=Sheet+carry

    Plan everything – there is only one of you so that means that you have to unload all the tools and supplies, do all the work, do the clean up, and put all the tools and supplies away. If your plan your work day ahead you can eliminate unnecessary steps and wasted time.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #158784
    #158787
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Sometimes just learning the right way to carry plywood will help.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #158791
    jdw1865
    Pro
    Dewey, OK

    I pick up the plywood and set an edge on the saw horses. Then I drop it so it falls mostly on the saw horses. If the plywood and/or the sawhorse are undamaged I continue work. Otherwise I say bad words and start all over.

    As far as working alone I alwasy try and keep my cell phone handy in case of accidents and emergencies.

    Stay ultra organized. That helps if you are alone or in groups.

    #158807
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    Number one tip….NEVER WASTE A TRIP up stairs or to the truck or up a ladder.

    Good advice no matter what you are doing.

    and that women with the sheet of plywood could lay a woopn’ on some of the men here. Seriously, she’s in pretty good shape. But she is only 5′ nothing so that tells you that anyone can do it.

    I also cut a lot of my rough lumber in the parking lot before I load it if I can.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #158969
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    All good tips so far.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #158973
    NJBuilder
    Pro
    Brick, NJ, 500,000 HAM

    I feel like I can accomplish alot more by my self than supervising another person regardless of skill.

    Number one tip….NEVER WASTE A TRIP up stairs or to the truck or up a ladder.

    Number 2 get some of the brainless things out of the way early so you dont feel like there is still alot to do while fussy with the tougher parts. Why add stress

    Never waste a trip is a good one!

    #158976
    SamM
    Pro
    Halifax, NS

    Keep some 8d brights in your pouch: they are perfect for setting a string, holding up a board end, ect. Pull out nice and easy.

    Plus the head fits the hole on the end of your tape nicely for getting an accurate long measure or for doing layout.

    Plan your materials so that when you stack them you never have to move them to get to something underneath. Moving the pile sucks anytime, but even more alone.

    #158981
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Plan your materials so that when you stack them you never have to move them to get to something underneath. Moving the pile sucks anytime, but even more alone.

    You got that right. If you don’t, what you need is always on the bottom.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #159013
    Lakelover
    Pro
    Fort Qu'Appelle, SK

    Clamps can be your friend.

    I work were there is no cel service. I let my wife know were I am and expected time home. So far so good.
    Getting material delivered to a specific site can be well worth the upcharge and your back.

    #159039
    SamM
    Pro
    Halifax, NS

    Clamps can be your friend.

    I work were there is no cel service. I let my wife know were I am and expected time home. So far so good.
    Getting material delivered to a specific site can be well worth the upcharge and your back.

    +1 on clamps. Ratchet straps as well. I use ratchet straps to straighten things all the time.

    I get most stuff delivered. My yard barely charges anything for delivery. It’s not worth my time to go to the yard for material unless it’s something small or if I’m already driving by.

    #159047

    Would this help you?
    http://www.amazon.com/Gorilla-Gripper-44010-Panel-Carrier/dp/B0007TYCA8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1404871339&sr=8-3&keywords=gorilla+grip

    The gorilla gripper is on my “to buy” list – I like it more than the other options you guys linked to… but I don’t usually deal with sheet goods riddled with nails haha :\ Nor am I moving a ton of sheets super often.

    Good tips so far all!

    Sometimes just learning the right way to carry plywood will help.

    Thanks for the vid – her little leg trick was something I hadn’t thought of.

    John S

    #159062
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Plan your materials so that when you stack them you never have to move them to get to something underneath. Moving the pile sucks anytime, but even more alone.

    BINGO, how many times have I seen piles of materials and what was needed first was at the bottom. What a pain.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #200137

    Sometimes just learning the right way to carry plywood will help.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”578″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/KIiTiM858Og?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>

    Nice little video she carryed it well . Teaching someone how to carry something helps them not hurt themselves .

    Keep some 8d brights in your pouch: they are perfect for setting a string, holding up a board end, ect. Pull out nice and easy.

    Plus the head fits the hole on the end of your tape nicely for getting an accurate long measure or for doing layout.

    Plan your materials so that when you stack them you never have to move them to get to something underneath. Moving the pile sucks anytime, but even more alone.

    Very true on the stageing materials . Done once the first time .

    Always willing to learn .

    #200197
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    My tip for working alone is always have your cell phone handy. If you get into deep at least you have an out. I won’t get on a ladder without my phone. Sure it won’t save you from being hurt but makes a world of difference if your laying on your broken back.

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