dcsimg

Tile showers and tub surrounds

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 654 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #456247
    AndyG
    Pro

    That’d be the minimum, but its all a judgement call.

    #456250
    Doobie
    Moderator

    That’d be the minimum, but its all a judgement call.

    I hear ya.

    How much dry fitting do you do Andy? You know what you’re doing, and I saw how a fellow on the internet had multiple videos of bathroom/shower tiling work, some time lapsed, seem to indicate that he had his tiles ready in order. While it didn’t show it, it led me to believe he precuts and does some ‘dry fitting’ in advance. I can see that with laying floor tiles or even backsplashes, but when doing a full wall such as in a shower stall, does one still do this? And if so, is there a special secret or methodology that makes such easier? Seems hard to do this on a long vertical run.

    I guess part of that answer is having perfect plumb and square walls. What kind of vertical deviation is acceptible? I’m assuming ‘none’, or like 1/32 of an inch top to bottom at best.

    #456251
    AndyG
    Pro

    Amount of deviation depends on material and trowel size …you can adjust a little with big stuff, but not with 1/2 mosaics . I’d say 1/8 on 5 feet at most .

    We dry lay depending on movement of pattern and customer preference …some tiles there is no advantage.

    #456258
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    You know what you’re doing, and I saw how a fellow on the internet had multiple videos of bathroom/shower tiling work, some time lapsed, seem to indicate that he had his tiles ready in order.

    Kevin,
    The pictures of my bathroom reno on page one. I pre-cut all the floor tiles and laid them out before thinset. I had to do this as the first because the floor by the doorway had a high spot due to wires for the in floor heating mat.
    It added extra time to laying them down but it was the easiest way for me to do it.
    The tiles at the tub all have an arch to them as the tug bows out a good 8″.

    All other bathroom renos that I have done, never required the tiles to be pre cut.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #456261
    AndyG
    Pro

    I’m pretty busy this p.m. , but if you guys are interested, I will try to hit first on framing details, plumbing rough scenarios and some electrical rough things you need to know to look for….just general things to prevent collisions and issues, not getting too far in the weeds on codes and all.

    #456591
    AndyG
    Pro

    Demo: One hard rule before you start : know where the water turn off is, verify it works and that you have tool to do so. Do not guess…a lot of water can dump while you are freaking out trying to turn it off. Be sure .

    Framing…check everything… …think in 3D- plumb, level, flat and also in plane …meaning when you put a straightedge across the studs, all touches and it doesn’t rock or have gaps . Be sure you block for glass, grab bars or future grab bars,pedestal sinks , accessories and where backer meets drywall. Keep the drywall OUTSIDE the glass line and out of the wet area . Water will transfer if given the opportunity. Think about drains, valves, pipes and lights…leave room where needed

    Curb framimg needs to be rock solid . Notch studs in corners where liners fold .

    Plumbing : know your true centers, heights and very importantly , depths. Factor in seats when laying out shower drains . Remember valves don’t have to be under shower heads…, factor in wainscot work if roughing in a toilet , make the plumber cap the supply lines and most everything outside the shower will be easier . carefully think through vanity build and vanity rough so lines aren’t hitting drawer guides, etc.
    Cover the drains until you get done …I have a long story about a PVC union a guy lost, and it was found 6 weeks later when basement drain started backing up in floor.
    Be sure fixtures are securely mounted , toilet flanges screwed down with stainless screws and all works. Diverters need to divert. Drains need to drain. Use pipe guards (nail plates) where needed.

    Electrical- keep it safe, use wire guards. Keep outlets in or out of tile, not 1/2 way, bear in mind mirror placement and be creative . outlets can gang in center between mirrors, lay sideways or go up high or with a switch …. miss mirrors with them when you can . Vent fans are a good thing ….. lights above mirrors are hard to plan, as ultimate elevation is often unknown …run a lead in wall, complete job and pull wire and set a remodel box at end if needed. 10 1/2 inches down with a wall mounted over mirror light works well with 8 foot ceiling most of the time . In floor heat is here to stay …get familiar with it . Ditra-heat is awesome. Led conversion kits make most cans code compliant in closets and wet areas .

    There’s a lot more , but these are general ideas that I’ve found helpful time after time . Baths are challenging, because , as Chad said, so many trades come together . Don’t be passive ….stay all over it ….or anything you miss will bite you in the butt when you are trying to wrap it up.

    Quality is rarely an accident . It’s the result of intelligent effort .

    #456593
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I’m pretty busy this p.m. , but if you guys are interested, I will try to hit first on framing details, plumbing rough scenarios and some electrical rough things you need to know to look for….just general things to prevent collisions and issues, not getting too far in the weeds on codes and all.

    That would be great.

    #457040

    Excellent list @AndyG. Alot of experience talking there. We try not to start any work until fixtures are in, cabinets are ready, a template date is set if doing granite, and layout decisions are done. Custom bathrooms and tile showers take long enough so having everything ready to go saves time.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #457049
    AndyG
    Pro

    Thats awesome . We have our own plumber on staff and have our own cabinet shap, so that helps ….but you are so right …avoid snags that hold up jobs . Not having a bath completed efficiently is tough for the client also.

    #457097

    Thats awesome . We have our own plumber on staff and have our own cabinet shap, so that helps ….but you are so right …avoid snags that hold up jobs . Not having a bath completed efficiently is tough for the client also.

    Yep…not quite as bad a taking away a kitchen but close.

    We do our plumbing in house as well…saves a ton of time. I find a couple weeks is pretty normal for a custom tile shower, tile floor and new vanity.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #457134
    ChadM
    Moderator
    Rogers, Ohio

    know where the water turn off is, verify it works and that you have tool to do so.

    Before I start demo I add ball valves to isolate the bathroom, if needed and if possible. Takes a lot of worry away.

    When doing electrical in the bath (or anywhere for that matter) I always lock out the breaker before I tie into the existing. A simple, cheap breaker lockout like this one does the trick -http://www.amazon.com/Master-Lock-Circuit-Breaker-Standard/dp/B007NAGJJG/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1452917748&sr=8-2&keywords=breaker+lockout

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #457182
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Before I start demo I add ball valves to isolate the bathroom, if needed and if possible. Takes a lot of worry away.

    I’ve done that with every bathroom I’ve worked on. Even if they have cheapo old fashioned turn valves, I change them to ball valves.

    #457217
    Warren6810
    Moderator
    Akron, OH

    That is a great list Andy. While I do not participate in the bath finish very often. We do a lot of demo. The shark bite caps have really helped with demo. They are also reusable. Before any demo, locate not only the water shut offs, but also know where the electrical service panel is. Get your demo into a trash can before it even hits the floor if possible. Touching anything twice, not to mention debris is a time waster, and having it all around you is a safety hazard.

    #457222
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    There’s a lot more , but these are general ideas that I’ve found helpful time after time . Baths are challenging, because , as Chad said, so many trades come together . Don’t be passive ….stay all over it ….or anything you miss will bite you in the butt when you are trying to wrap it up.

    Quality is rarely an accident . It’s the result of intelligent effort .

    A ton of great advice Andy. Thank You. Most I have done while I reno’d my bathroom and maybe that’s why it took me several months from start to finish.

    Before I start demo I add ball valves to isolate the bathroom, if needed and if possible. Takes a lot of worry away.

    They should outlaw those old turn valves and get them off the shelves in stores.
    I too replace all old valves with 1/4 turn ball valves no matter who/where i’m plumbing.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #457270
    AndyG
    Pro

    On tubs , the tub needs to ideally have an integrated flange and be tight to the framing . The board can stop at the flange , do it doesn’t bow out the backer board.

    The tub has to almost always be in tight to the framing for all to work out well.

    My guys carry 1/8 and 1/4 inch firring strips to align studs prior to board going on.

    #457271
    AndyG
    Pro

    Meant so it doesn’t bow….I need to proofread !

    #457273

    I am trying the new GoBoard right now. I will post some pics later. It is similar to Wedi board in that you seal all seams with a urethane sealant. I used Sonneborne NP1. I used a Kerdi pan and drain kit. I am flood testing on Monday.

    Initial thoughts on the Goboard vs regular cememt board or Denshield is I like it! I was able to carry 3 sheets (3’x5′) up the stairs with 1 hand. It cuts wonderfully! Sharp knife and a straightedge give great cuts.

    For fastening I did both cement board screws and 1-1/2″ galv nails. Both are approved fasteners. I actually prefered the nails. The head of the nail would dimple the board just a little better than the screw which tended to break the facing. Then when you cover the fasteners with the NP1 the nails covered better due to the slight dimple.

    For the joint sealing I would apply a nice thick bead of sealant to the edges and place the pieces into each other forcing out the excess. Then I used a cheap putty knife to smooth out the excess. I went over all seams again with more sealant as an extra pre-caution. I know the concept of relying on caulking to be waterproof bothers some but when I did my initial testing the joints were amazingly strong. When I finally did get it to fail the facing actually pulled from the core meaning the sealant had bonded to the facing.

    As a second option one could leave a small 1/8″ gap and fill that with thinset. Apply fiberglass mesh tape over the seams and thinset again. Once dried you when then apply 2 coats of your favorite liquid waterproofing. I suppose you could use Kerdi band over the seams too as a third option.

    I will cover this more later.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #457280
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    I am trying the new GoBoard right now.

    I had to look GoBoard up. Looks like some interesting stuff Andrew.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #457318

    Here are some pics. I like the light weight size but I would really like to try KerdiBoard. It comes in 4×8 sheets which would eliminate/reduce most seams in a shower. It is just not available close to me and the shipping cost makes it oit of reach for me right now.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #457346
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    All sounds like good advice. I also put new ball valves in right away so the rest of the house can function while working on the bathroom and be sure to show the owner where they are and how they work. I have found many people do not know how a gfi outlet works or why it is there .
    Again inform them . I have went several times for a no power issue and find a gfi tripped .

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 654 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 0.915 seconds