dcsimg

The Hack Hall of Fame V4

Viewing 20 posts - 881 through 900 (of 903 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #758304
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Once I opened the door for the guard for the pulley. I saw that the key was missing from pulley. Someone had a bolt thread in the key way.

    That was not very nice. Keyways are not that hard to find. If you can’t find an exact fit buy a bit bigger and hand file to size.

    No it wasn’t. I guess this a good reason. You should never pay too much for used equipment. Yes your right keyways are not to hard to find. Just alittle difficult now with Covid. I would have to say this took place before Covid. I remember my Dad filing a keyway to make fit when I was a kid.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #758305
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Once I opened the door for the guard for the pulley. I saw that the key was missing from pulley. Someone had a bolt thread in the key way.

    That was not very nice. Keyways are not that hard to find. If you can’t find an exact fit buy a bit bigger and hand file to size.

    Exactly, but that would be doing it right, and involve a hand tool, too many people prefer quick and are afraid of hand work 🙂

    Very good point. Alot of people couldn’t be bothered taking the time to do things right. I am sure if they are just lazy or they feel they fixed it right by the way they did it. Honestly I don’t think we will ever know.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #758314

    Once I opened the door for the guard for the pulley. I saw that the key was missing from pulley. Someone had a bolt thread in the key way.

    That was not very nice. Keyways are not that hard to find. If you can’t find an exact fit buy a bit bigger and hand file to size.

    Exactly, but that would be doing it right, and involve a hand tool, too many people prefer quick and are afraid of hand work 🙂

    Oh man , I don’t know how many times I’ve seen younger guys pull out the high speed grinder , grind it down super fast , but after a few weeks or day’s of the motor turning high speed in both directions , doesn’t take too long before it’s snagged because of backlash 🤷‍♂️ , definitely hand filling is better sometimes

    #758324
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    , definitely hand filling is better sometimes

    What do you mean by sometimes?? 🤷‍♂️

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #758326

    , definitely hand filling is better sometimes

    What do you mean by sometimes?? 🤷‍♂️

    I mean as apposed to using power tools by hand 🤷‍♂️

    Power tools are good , but sometimes not for everything

    In aircraft , we use pulleys and sprockets , but our tolerance is closer than what is needed for a bandsaw
    So hand filling will get you closer in tolerance as apposed to grinding to much then having backlash

    #758645
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Yesterday we tore apart a wall to remove a deck and install a ledger board for a new deck.

    What we found was interesting. When we started, we found that the joist hangers at the house appeared to be fastened to the sheeting and sided over. As we removed the siding and we found that the original siding was Masonite siding and the joist hangers were just cut around leaving about a 4 x 6 inch square of siding behind them.

    What was interesting is that the home has 1″ foam sheeting on it. Attaching a deck or something like that through foam sheeting is not a recommended practice. At least they did use a 16D or 20 D galvanized nail to fasten the joist hangers securely.

    we cut out the sheeting, installed a flashing behind it and installed our ledger board fastened directly to the rim board and studs.

    There was a cable wire running through the wall also, When we have this, we ask our installers to drill the hole with a downslope to the exterior. This particular hole sloped to the interior .

    The double plates for the wall below the deck were obviously footing forms from when the home was built, which is not allowed either.

    Over all, however, I was amazed at how little water penetration there was from the above details. You could see where the sliding door above had leaked prior to it being replaced, but that is fairly common.

    #758663
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    Once I opened the door for the guard for the pulley. I saw that the key was missing from pulley. Someone had a bolt thread in the key way.

    Hope that bolt didn’t screw up the keyways

    #758668

    Yesterday we tore apart a wall to remove a deck and install a ledger board for a new deck.

    What we found was interesting. When we started, we found that the joist hangers at the house appeared to be fastened to the sheeting and sided over. As we removed the siding and we found that the original siding was Masonite siding and the joist hangers were just cut around leaving about a 4 x 6 inch square of siding behind them.

    What was interesting is that the home has 1″ foam sheeting on it. Attaching a deck or something like that through foam sheeting is not a recommended practice. At least they did use a 16D or 20 D galvanized nail to fasten the joist hangers securely.

    we cut out the sheeting, installed a flashing behind it and installed our ledger board fastened directly to the rim board and studs.

    There was a cable wire running through the wall also, When we have this, we ask our installers to drill the hole with a downslope to the exterior. This particular hole sloped to the interior .

    The double plates for the wall below the deck were obviously footing forms from when the home was built, which is not allowed either.

    Over all, however, I was amazed at how little water penetration there was from the above details. You could see where the sliding door above had leaked prior to it being replaced, but that is fairly common.

    Wow , that’s pretty interesting , good thing it was a low deck and probably had some decent footing I would imagine , otherwise it could have been extremely dangerous 🤷‍♂️
    Are those white pipes in the last two pictures for a furnace intake and exhaust ,
    What is the light grey color tube close to the camera in the last two pictures.

    #758669
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Yesterday we tore apart a wall to remove a deck and install a ledger board for a new deck.

    What we found was interesting. When we started, we found that the joist hangers at the house appeared to be fastened to the sheeting and sided over. As we removed the siding and we found that the original siding was Masonite siding and the joist hangers were just cut around leaving about a 4 x 6 inch square of siding behind them.

    What was interesting is that the home has 1″ foam sheeting on it. Attaching a deck or something like that through foam sheeting is not a recommended practice. At least they did use a 16D or 20 D galvanized nail to fasten the joist hangers securely.

    we cut out the sheeting, installed a flashing behind it and installed our ledger board fastened directly to the rim board and studs.

    There was a cable wire running through the wall also, When we have this, we ask our installers to drill the hole with a downslope to the exterior. This particular hole sloped to the interior .

    The double plates for the wall below the deck were obviously footing forms from when the home was built, which is not allowed either.

    Over all, however, I was amazed at how little water penetration there was from the above details. You could see where the sliding door above had leaked prior to it being replaced, but that is fairly common.

    Wow , that’s pretty interesting , good thing it was a low deck and probably had some decent footing I would imagine , otherwise it could have been extremely dangerous 🤷‍♂️

    Are those white pipes in the last two pictures for a furnace intake and exhaust ,

    What is the light grey color tube close to the camera in the last two pictures.

    the white pipes are the furnace exhaust and intake. the light gray pipes in the middle of the photo, are the wiring for the AC unit and the think sticking out very close to the camera is my pencil to show how the hole sloped into the house instead of outward.

    The footings were only about 8″ in diameter and 3′ deep. I made a footing puller for another job that we used to pull them. we were able to pull them using it and only digging about 6″ deep to get a chain around the top of the footing. It worked well, but I did not have my video set up well, and it did not turn out, to post that. Next time we do this again I will post a video of the post puller.

    #758671

    Yesterday we tore apart a wall to remove a deck and install a ledger board for a new deck.

    What we found was interesting. When we started, we found that the joist hangers at the house appeared to be fastened to the sheeting and sided over. As we removed the siding and we found that the original siding was Masonite siding and the joist hangers were just cut around leaving about a 4 x 6 inch square of siding behind them.

    What was interesting is that the home has 1″ foam sheeting on it. Attaching a deck or something like that through foam sheeting is not a recommended practice. At least they did use a 16D or 20 D galvanized nail to fasten the joist hangers securely.

    we cut out the sheeting, installed a flashing behind it and installed our ledger board fastened directly to the rim board and studs.

    There was a cable wire running through the wall also, When we have this, we ask our installers to drill the hole with a downslope to the exterior. This particular hole sloped to the interior .

    The double plates for the wall below the deck were obviously footing forms from when the home was built, which is not allowed either.

    Over all, however, I was amazed at how little water penetration there was from the above details. You could see where the sliding door above had leaked prior to it being replaced, but that is fairly common.

    Wow , that’s pretty interesting , good thing it was a low deck and probably had some decent footing I would imagine , otherwise it could have been extremely dangerous 🤷‍♂️

    Are those white pipes in the last two pictures for a furnace intake and exhaust ,

    What is the light grey color tube close to the camera in the last two pictures.

    the white pipes are the furnace exhaust and intake. the light gray pipes in the middle of the photo, are the wiring for the AC unit and the think sticking out very close to the camera is my pencil to show how the hole sloped into the house instead of outward.

    The footings were only about 8″ in diameter and 3′ deep. I made a footing puller for another job that we used to pull them. we were able to pull them using it and only digging about 6″ deep to get a chain around the top of the footing. It worked well, but I did not have my video set up well, and it did not turn out, to post that. Next time we do this again I will post a video of the post puller.

    Thanks for the info Kurt , that sounds like it is a great idea for pulling out footings ,
    I’d definitely like to see it , do you use it on a skid steer or a small backhoe , I need to figure something out for pulling up my fence posts that have gone rotten and I have to pull up the concrete , I gotta do it most probably manually
    Would like to see that video sometime

    #758672
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Once I opened the door for the guard for the pulley. I saw that the key was missing from pulley. Someone had a bolt thread in the key way.

    Hope that bolt didn’t screw up the keyways

    I don’t think it did. I still need clean up the shaft. I haven’t had a chance to put it back together yet.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #758693
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Yesterday we tore apart a wall to remove a deck and install a ledger board for a new deck.

    What we found was interesting. When we started, we found that the joist hangers at the house appeared to be fastened to the sheeting and sided over. As we removed the siding and we found that the original siding was Masonite siding and the joist hangers were just cut around leaving about a 4 x 6 inch square of siding behind them.

    What was interesting is that the home has 1″ foam sheeting on it. Attaching a deck or something like that through foam sheeting is not a recommended practice. At least they did use a 16D or 20 D galvanized nail to fasten the joist hangers securely.

    we cut out the sheeting, installed a flashing behind it and installed our ledger board fastened directly to the rim board and studs.

    There was a cable wire running through the wall also, When we have this, we ask our installers to drill the hole with a downslope to the exterior. This particular hole sloped to the interior .

    The double plates for the wall below the deck were obviously footing forms from when the home was built, which is not allowed either.

    Over all, however, I was amazed at how little water penetration there was from the above details. You could see where the sliding door above had leaked prior to it being replaced, but that is fairly common.

    Wow , that’s pretty interesting , good thing it was a low deck and probably had some decent footing I would imagine , otherwise it could have been extremely dangerous 🤷‍♂️

    Are those white pipes in the last two pictures for a furnace intake and exhaust ,

    What is the light grey color tube close to the camera in the last two pictures.

    the white pipes are the furnace exhaust and intake. the light gray pipes in the middle of the photo, are the wiring for the AC unit and the think sticking out very close to the camera is my pencil to show how the hole sloped into the house instead of outward.

    The footings were only about 8″ in diameter and 3′ deep. I made a footing puller for another job that we used to pull them. we were able to pull them using it and only digging about 6″ deep to get a chain around the top of the footing. It worked well, but I did not have my video set up well, and it did not turn out, to post that. Next time we do this again I will post a video of the post puller.

    Thanks for the info Kurt , that sounds like it is a great idea for pulling out footings ,

    I’d definitely like to see it , do you use it on a skid steer or a small backhoe , I need to figure something out for pulling up my fence posts that have gone rotten and I have to pull up the concrete , I gotta do it most probably manually

    Would like to see that video sometime

    It is basically a modified two wheel dolly with a handyman jack attached, which is a very simplified description. It is all manual with the jack. it works great in yards and places you cannot get a skidloader or do not want to e=tear up the grass. It would work well or even better if a post was attached. attached is a photo of what I modeled it after.

    Attachments:
    #758695

    Yesterday we tore apart a wall to remove a deck and install a ledger board for a new deck.

    What we found was interesting. When we started, we found that the joist hangers at the house appeared to be fastened to the sheeting and sided over. As we removed the siding and we found that the original siding was Masonite siding and the joist hangers were just cut around leaving about a 4 x 6 inch square of siding behind them.

    What was interesting is that the home has 1″ foam sheeting on it. Attaching a deck or something like that through foam sheeting is not a recommended practice. At least they did use a 16D or 20 D galvanized nail to fasten the joist hangers securely.

    we cut out the sheeting, installed a flashing behind it and installed our ledger board fastened directly to the rim board and studs.

    There was a cable wire running through the wall also, When we have this, we ask our installers to drill the hole with a downslope to the exterior. This particular hole sloped to the interior .

    The double plates for the wall below the deck were obviously footing forms from when the home was built, which is not allowed either.

    Over all, however, I was amazed at how little water penetration there was from the above details. You could see where the sliding door above had leaked prior to it being replaced, but that is fairly common.

    Wow , that’s pretty interesting , good thing it was a low deck and probably had some decent footing I would imagine , otherwise it could have been extremely dangerous 🤷‍♂️

    Are those white pipes in the last two pictures for a furnace intake and exhaust ,

    What is the light grey color tube close to the camera in the last two pictures.

    the white pipes are the furnace exhaust and intake. the light gray pipes in the middle of the photo, are the wiring for the AC unit and the think sticking out very close to the camera is my pencil to show how the hole sloped into the house instead of outward.

    The footings were only about 8″ in diameter and 3′ deep. I made a footing puller for another job that we used to pull them. we were able to pull them using it and only digging about 6″ deep to get a chain around the top of the footing. It worked well, but I did not have my video set up well, and it did not turn out, to post that. Next time we do this again I will post a video of the post puller.

    Thanks for the info Kurt , that sounds like it is a great idea for pulling out footings ,

    I’d definitely like to see it , do you use it on a skid steer or a small backhoe , I need to figure something out for pulling up my fence posts that have gone rotten and I have to pull up the concrete , I gotta do it most probably manually

    Would like to see that video sometime

    It is basically a modified two wheel dolly with a handyman jack attached, which is a very simplified description. It is all manual with the jack. it works great in yards and places you cannot get a skidloader or do not want to e=tear up the grass. It would work well or even better if a post was attached. attached is a photo of what I modeled it after.

    😮🤯🤯 That’s a great idea Kurt , now you got my marbles turning lol , I was originally thinking about something like a teepee of either 4×4 posts with something like a winch pulley on the top , but your method seems pretty simple but effective 👍👌
    I’ll definitely be looking into that
    Thank you very much

    #758697
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    It is basically a modified two wheel dolly with a handyman jack attached, which is a very simplified description. It is all manual with the jack. it works great in yards and places you cannot get a skidloader or do not want to e=tear up the grass. It would work well or even better if a post was attached. attached is a photo of what I modeled it after.

    What a great idea. Looks like it works well.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #758704
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Yesterday we tore apart a wall to remove a deck and install a ledger board for a new deck.

    What we found was interesting. When we started, we found that the joist hangers at the house appeared to be fastened to the sheeting and sided over. As we removed the siding and we found that the original siding was Masonite siding and the joist hangers were just cut around leaving about a 4 x 6 inch square of siding behind them.

    What was interesting is that the home has 1″ foam sheeting on it. Attaching a deck or something like that through foam sheeting is not a recommended practice. At least they did use a 16D or 20 D galvanized nail to fasten the joist hangers securely.

    we cut out the sheeting, installed a flashing behind it and installed our ledger board fastened directly to the rim board and studs.

    There was a cable wire running through the wall also, When we have this, we ask our installers to drill the hole with a downslope to the exterior. This particular hole sloped to the interior .

    The double plates for the wall below the deck were obviously footing forms from when the home was built, which is not allowed either.

    Over all, however, I was amazed at how little water penetration there was from the above details. You could see where the sliding door above had leaked prior to it being replaced, but that is fairly common.

    Wow , that’s pretty interesting , good thing it was a low deck and probably had some decent footing I would imagine , otherwise it could have been extremely dangerous 🤷‍♂️

    Are those white pipes in the last two pictures for a furnace intake and exhaust ,

    What is the light grey color tube close to the camera in the last two pictures.

    the white pipes are the furnace exhaust and intake. the light gray pipes in the middle of the photo, are the wiring for the AC unit and the think sticking out very close to the camera is my pencil to show how the hole sloped into the house instead of outward.

    The footings were only about 8″ in diameter and 3′ deep. I made a footing puller for another job that we used to pull them. we were able to pull them using it and only digging about 6″ deep to get a chain around the top of the footing. It worked well, but I did not have my video set up well, and it did not turn out, to post that. Next time we do this again I will post a video of the post puller.

    Thanks for the info Kurt , that sounds like it is a great idea for pulling out footings ,

    I’d definitely like to see it , do you use it on a skid steer or a small backhoe , I need to figure something out for pulling up my fence posts that have gone rotten and I have to pull up the concrete , I gotta do it most probably manually

    Would like to see that video sometime

    It is basically a modified two wheel dolly with a handyman jack attached, which is a very simplified description. It is all manual with the jack. it works great in yards and places you cannot get a skidloader or do not want to e=tear up the grass. It would work well or even better if a post was attached. attached is a photo of what I modeled it after.

    That looks like a pretty handy invention. From the picture looks like would work quite well.
    I need to keep this idea in mind as I have fence to replace pretty soon.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #758713
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    That’s a great idea Kurt , now you got my marbles turning lol , I was originally thinking about something like a teepee of either 4×4 posts with something like a winch pulley on the top , but your method seems pretty simple but effective
    I’ll definitely be looking into that
    Thank you very much

    Definitely a good idea I have to make one if I redo my fence.

    One similar idea I used before is to use a racing car jack. Take a short piece of 2×4 and screw it to the side of a wood fence post, insert the jack under the 2×4 and pump, I also screw one on the other side, then switch the jack to that side and pump, keep doing that until it’s loosened up enough. Obviously if your post is rotted at the bottom this won’t work because it will just break it off.

    #758719

    That’s a great idea Kurt , now you got my marbles turning lol , I was originally thinking about something like a teepee of either 4×4 posts with something like a winch pulley on the top , but your method seems pretty simple but effective

    I’ll definitely be looking into that

    Thank you very much

    Definitely a good idea I have to make one if I redo my fence.

    One similar idea I used before is to use a racing car jack. Take a short piece of 2×4 and screw it to the side of a wood fence post, insert the jack under the 2×4 and pump, I also screw one on the other side, then switch the jack to that side and pump, keep doing that until it’s loosened up enough. Obviously if your post is rotted at the bottom this won’t work because it will just break it off.

    Yeah I’ve seen that one , but you are right , some of my posts are in extremely critical condition lol ,
    I’ve also seen someone used that jack you are talking about , but just dug around the concrete and tied a chain around the concrete and pull it up slowly

    #758816
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    Went to trim out a house for a local contractor. Walk into one of the baths to find this. Plumber set the tub and left it in the shipping stuff. Then the drywall guys even finished over it. lol

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #758818

    Went to trim out a house for a local contractor. Walk into one of the baths to find this. Plumber set the tub and left it in the shipping stuff. Then the drywall guys even finished over it. lol

    😲 LoL well at least if they ever have to replace it it’s gonna be almost ready to ship LoL
    Like they say , it’s not my job to remove that lol

    #758820
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Went to trim out a house for a local contractor. Walk into one of the baths to find this. Plumber set the tub and left it in the shipping stuff. Then the drywall guys even finished over it. lol

    unbelievable, I cannot believe that the contractor would not have seen this before they drywaller got that far. It should be a fairly easy fix , but really?

Viewing 20 posts - 881 through 900 (of 903 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 1.139 seconds