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The Hack Hall of Fame V4

Viewing 20 posts - 421 through 440 (of 903 total)
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  • #719937
    CB
    Spectator

    Reminded me of how to distinguish Frito Lay potato chips.

    https://youtu.be/_0zxGMOo3zU

    I totally don’t get that. What do Ruffles Chips have to do with this?

    Ruffles have ridges.

    #719940
    CB
    Spectator

    Flexible stainless steel tubing, commonly known as CSST, can easily be distinguished from aluminum tubing in a number of different ways, but the ridges formed into CSST are the most obvious identifiable characteristic that contributes to CSST’s flexibility without fatigue.

    CSST is typically used in two applications in residential natural gas piping. Exposed appliance connectors, where the ridges are really obvious, and branch supply runs, which are generally unexposed, and where the ridges are not as obvious, due to the thicker protective coatings on the branch supply type CSST.

    These thicker protective coatings used to be yellow, and the rolls of CSST sold at the big box stores still are, but the professional plumbing supply houses stock newer more lightning proof brands of CSST that have a faraday cage embedded in the outer coating, that is typically black, to distinguish it from earlier yellow CSST tubing that lacks the mesh bonding shield.

    Other ways to distinguish aluminum tubing from flexible steel tubing are in the material itself. The tubing wall thickness for any given comparable diameter is different between stainless steel and aluminum. The granularity of the metal in cross section is different, and this difference is easily recognized by anyone having experience working with metals. Not much experience is required to quickly ascertain the difference.

    #719941
    CB
    Spectator

    More details on why aluminum tubing, as encountered in this horrendous hack job, is not ideally suited for plumbing natural gas:

    #719942
    CB
    Spectator

    #719943
    CB
    Spectator

    SO. MUCH. FAIL.

    Code requires that a gas shut off valve be located in the same room as the gas appliance being served.

    #719972
    monman1
    Pro

    Here are some good pics of other framers in my area. The plywood was nailed but all the nail where shot thru the plywood. And then there was the fascia boards, there just so bad.

    Wow, that’s some serious curve!

    2 of them: one in the middle and another one at the end.
    They didn’t cut the rafters to be equal.

    It not a cut roof, its trusses.

    Member since April 4, 2014

    doer of all , master of none.

    #719976
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Here are some good pics of other framers in my area. The plywood was nailed but all the nail where shot thru the plywood. And then there was the fascia boards, there just so bad.

    And it will get finished and some one will buy it and live in it never knowing the difference. LOL!

    #719977
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Reminded me of how to distinguish Frito Lay potato chips.

    https://youtu.be/_0zxGMOo3zU

    I totally don’t get that. What do Ruffles Chips have to do with this?

    Ruffles have ridges.

    Now I understand the correlation intended.

    #720053
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    this is a deck we need to repair at a condo association. I believe there are at least three more like this. we replaced 4 a couple years ago also.

    The LVL’s were not treated or protected from moisture. there is nothing left of the exterior one. This will be replaced by a treated gluelam beam.

    There is nothing fastening the post to the beam other than a couple of toenails. The posts will be replaced with new treated 6 x 6 posts.

    None of the fasteners used were galvanized. I am not sure why the joist were not fastened directly to the LVL. They used a 2 x 8 rim and fastened the joist to it. we cannot see any nails through the 2 x 8 into the LVL. It may have been fastened from the back side of the LVL and covered with the second ply, we will see when we take it apart. Only 3 of the 5 holes on each side of the joist hanger have nails in them and they are 1 1/4″ JH nails. There are no nails from the side of the hanger into the joist. The joist are starting to rotate off of the 2 x 8 rim, because there are no nails into the side of the joist.

    It is amazing that this exists and that it is still standing.

    #720060
    Doobie
    Moderator

    this is a deck we need to repair at a condo association. I believe there are at least three more like this. we replaced 4 a couple years ago also.

    The LVL’s were not treated or protected from moisture. there is nothing left of the exterior one. This will be replaced by a treated gluelam beam.

    There is nothing fastening the post to the beam other than a couple of toenails. The posts will be replaced with new treated 6 x 6 posts.

    None of the fasteners used were galvanized. I am not sure why the joist were not fastened directly to the LVL. They used a 2 x 8 rim and fastened the joist to it. we cannot see any nails through the 2 x 8 into the LVL. It may have been fastened from the back side of the LVL and covered with the second ply, we will see when we take it apart. Only 3 of the 5 holes on each side of the joist hanger have nails in them and they are 1 1/4″ JH nails. There are no nails from the side of the hanger into the joist. The joist are starting to rotate off of the 2 x 8 rim, because there are no nails into the side of the joist.

    It is amazing that this exists and that it is still standing.

    What did they think, it would never rain or snow?

    Was this done by the original builder, or some hack years later?

    #720080
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    this is a deck we need to repair at a condo association. I believe there are at least three more like this. we replaced 4 a couple years ago also.

    The LVL’s were not treated or protected from moisture. there is nothing left of the exterior one. This will be replaced by a treated gluelam beam.

    There is nothing fastening the post to the beam other than a couple of toenails. The posts will be replaced with new treated 6 x 6 posts.

    None of the fasteners used were galvanized. I am not sure why the joist were not fastened directly to the LVL. They used a 2 x 8 rim and fastened the joist to it. we cannot see any nails through the 2 x 8 into the LVL. It may have been fastened from the back side of the LVL and covered with the second ply, we will see when we take it apart. Only 3 of the 5 holes on each side of the joist hanger have nails in them and they are 1 1/4″ JH nails. There are no nails from the side of the hanger into the joist. The joist are starting to rotate off of the 2 x 8 rim, because there are no nails into the side of the joist.

    It is amazing that this exists and that it is still standing.

    What did they think, it would never rain or snow?

    Was this done by the original builder, or some hack years later?

    It was done when the units were built originally. I really do not understand their thought process. Part of the problem is there is no code enforcement in the area so IMHO it is a free for all. I tried to get a local contractor to do the repairs and they tole me there is no such thing as a treated gluelam, so they would use treated 2 x 12’s. The three 2 x 12’s there were proposing, were barely 1/2 of what was required to support the deck.

    I told them that they and the lumber yard who told them the treated glue lam did not exist needed to get out and do a little research. That I had used them before and knew they were available. They insisted they were not.

    So in the long run it is easier to do the work with my guys instead of trying to educate the locals on proper construction techniques.

    I go through the new homes that they have on the local parade most years and am amazed at what they get by with when it comes to life safety.

    #720110
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    this is a deck we need to repair at a condo association. I believe there are at least three more like this. we replaced 4 a couple years ago also.

    That is some really bad construction. Looks like they just slapped the deck up as fast as they could.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #720152
    Doobie
    Moderator

    this is a deck we need to repair at a condo association. I believe there are at least three more like this. we replaced 4 a couple years ago also.

    The LVL’s were not treated or protected from moisture. there is nothing left of the exterior one. This will be replaced by a treated gluelam beam.

    There is nothing fastening the post to the beam other than a couple of toenails. The posts will be replaced with new treated 6 x 6 posts.

    None of the fasteners used were galvanized. I am not sure why the joist were not fastened directly to the LVL. They used a 2 x 8 rim and fastened the joist to it. we cannot see any nails through the 2 x 8 into the LVL. It may have been fastened from the back side of the LVL and covered with the second ply, we will see when we take it apart. Only 3 of the 5 holes on each side of the joist hanger have nails in them and they are 1 1/4″ JH nails. There are no nails from the side of the hanger into the joist. The joist are starting to rotate off of the 2 x 8 rim, because there are no nails into the side of the joist.

    It is amazing that this exists and that it is still standing.

    What did they think, it would never rain or snow?

    Was this done by the original builder, or some hack years later?

    It was done when the units were built originally. I really do not understand their thought process. Part of the problem is there is no code enforcement in the area so IMHO it is a free for all. I tried to get a local contractor to do the repairs and they tole me there is no such thing as a treated gluelam, so they would use treated 2 x 12’s. The three 2 x 12’s there were proposing, were barely 1/2 of what was required to support the deck.

    I told them that they and the lumber yard who told them the treated glue lam did not exist needed to get out and do a little research. That I had used them before and knew they were available. They insisted they were not.

    So in the long run it is easier to do the work with my guys instead of trying to educate the locals on proper construction techniques.

    I go through the new homes that they have on the local parade most years and am amazed at what they get by with when it comes to life safety.

    That’s a sad state of affairs out where you are Kurt. I pity the homeowners.

    #720160
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I tried to get a local contractor to do the repairs and they tole me there is no such thing as a treated gluelam,

    WoW,, I have never seen a untreated glulam.. Hacks will be hacks!

    #720172
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    That’s a sad state of affairs out where you are Kurt. I pity the homeowners.

    I think south Florida is worse, much worse. What Kurt showed is common here 😱 and I am not kidding.

    #720201
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    this is a deck we need to repair at a condo association. I believe there are at least three more like this. we replaced 4 a couple years ago also.

    The LVL’s were not treated or protected from moisture. there is nothing left of the exterior one. This will be replaced by a treated gluelam beam.

    There is nothing fastening the post to the beam other than a couple of toenails. The posts will be replaced with new treated 6 x 6 posts.

    None of the fasteners used were galvanized. I am not sure why the joist were not fastened directly to the LVL. They used a 2 x 8 rim and fastened the joist to it. we cannot see any nails through the 2 x 8 into the LVL. It may have been fastened from the back side of the LVL and covered with the second ply, we will see when we take it apart. Only 3 of the 5 holes on each side of the joist hanger have nails in them and they are 1 1/4″ JH nails. There are no nails from the side of the hanger into the joist. The joist are starting to rotate off of the 2 x 8 rim, because there are no nails into the side of the joist.

    It is amazing that this exists and that it is still standing.

    Terrifying too – that’s no ground level patio, people could really get hurt on or under that thing! Good thing you’re going through and correcting that – I hope you’re educating the HO’s a little just so they can appreciate what it is you’re saving them from.

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

    #720211
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I think south Florida is worse, much worse.

    Now that is really scary.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #720252
    Doobie
    Moderator

    There’s an article in the paper this morning about a deck collapse at a wedding in Vancouver where 12 people are hurt, some critically.

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-dozens-injured-after-collapse-of-deck-during-wedding-celebration-in/

    #720265
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    There’s an article in the paper this morning about a deck collapse at a wedding in Vancouver where 12 people are hurt, some critically.

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-dozens-injured-after-collapse-of-deck-during-wedding-celebration-in/

    That’s horrible.

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

    #720271
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    There’s an article in the paper this morning about a deck collapse at a wedding in Vancouver where 12 people are hurt, some critically.

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-dozens-injured-after-collapse-of-deck-during-wedding-celebration-in/

    Seem like this stuff is all to common up there.

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