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The Hack Hall of Fame V2

This topic contains 1,008 replies, has 46 voices, and was last updated by  RonW 3 years, 4 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 261 through 280 (of 1,009 total)
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  • #471355

    Doobie
    Moderator

    How about this electrical box…overloaded and the wires are passing directly through the knock outs. No wire clamps used.

    But at least it has the wire clamps .

    NO clamps were used! They were just left to rub the edges of the knockouts.

    I’m talking about the wire nail clips holding the wire about 6″ away from box . Did you see inside the box there a clamp that you screw down to hold the wires .

    Oh, yes there were wire staples. The screw down things were as far open as they could be…not sure why.

    Are you allowed to put two sheathed wires thru one knockout? Not sure, but I’ve never done it.

    Probably because they didn’t pre-drill holes in the 2X for the screws. Those screws don’t like to thread into wood

    I think it’s because they simply just didn’t know that’s what you are supposed to do. Just look how crappy everything looks.

    #471410

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    How about this electrical box…overloaded and the wires are passing directly through the knock outs. No wire clamps used.

    Well, they has the sense to use marrets. LOL Inside the box is not too messy either. Got to wonder why they would not have clamped down the incoming wires and no slack left outside either.

    Jon,
    What was the wrapped up extension cord used for?

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #471435

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    The screw down things were as far open as they could be…not sure why.

    Probably because they didn’t pre-drill holes in the 2X for the screws. Those screws don’t like to thread into wood

    Good point… They were machine screws, so they wouldn’t pull themselves into the wood.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #471442

    Check this out @jponto07 .

    Attachments:

    Always willing to learn .

    #471454

    Breaks my heart to admit that every box in my 1950s house looks like that, save for the few done since we moved in.

    Still considering whether its worth re-wiring the whole house – been fine since 1950, but its a bit sketchy

    #471467

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Check this out jponto07 .

    Nice…I’ll bet those boxes both had the plastic tabs that you just push the wire through too. Way to make things harder!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #471516

    I’ve seen a lot of wires spliced outside of junction boxes and even recessed lights. I honestly think some people are lucky to still have their houses. There are many reasons why a handyman isn’t always the best choice, especially when it comes to electrical. A couple of years ago I received a all to repair a ceiling fan that wasn’t hugging the ceiling anymore. I should have taken a picture of the ceiling side. When I went into the attic I found it was mounted to a plastic box that was clamped to a metal bar. The box broke where the screws attached to the clamp. The only thing holding the box above the Sheetrock was the nail tabs on the side. This wasn’t a case of someone taking down a light and installing a fan. It was someone adding a new outlet for a fan.

    Attachments:

    Anything is possible if your wallet is thick enough ~ my father

    #471892

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    When I went into the attic I found it was mounted to a plastic box that was clamped to a metal bar. The box broke where the screws attached to the clamp.

    Now that is some hack work right there.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #471905

    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    How about this electrical box…overloaded and the wires are passing directly through the knock outs. No wire clamps used.

    Well, they has the sense to use marrets. LOL Inside the box is not too messy either. Got to wonder why they would not have clamped down the incoming wires and no slack left outside either.

    Jon,
    What was the wrapped up extension cord used for?

    That is a major fire just waiting to happen . I’m not a electrician and I even know not to do that .

    #471920

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Jon,
    What was the wrapped up extension cord used for?

    Sadly this is in my workshop…the messy box was ripped out and dne properly.

    The cord is for my assembly table. It has 6 outlets on it. I really wasn’t sure how to power it properly, but maintain the ability to unplug the table and move it temporarily if necessary. I decided a heavy SOOW cord would do the job.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #471934

    RonW
    Pro
    Holladay, Tn

    I’ve seen a lot of wires spliced outside of junction boxes and even recessed lights. I honestly think some people are lucky to still have their houses. There are many reasons why a handyman isn’t always the best choice, especially when it comes to electrical. A couple of years ago I received a all to repair a ceiling fan that wasn’t hugging the ceiling anymore. I should have taken a picture of the ceiling side. When I went into the attic I found it was mounted to a plastic box that was clamped to a metal bar. The box broke where the screws attached to the clamp. The only thing holding the box above the Sheetrock was the nail tabs on the side. This wasn’t a case of someone taking down a light and installing a fan. It was someone adding a new outlet for a fan.

    That could have been bad Garrett. Crazy what some people will do.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #471943

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    How about this electrical box…overloaded and the wires are passing directly through the knock outs. No wire clamps used.

    Just waiting for the insulation to be be rubbed through so they can short out.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #473193

    Clev08
    Pro

    This is my go to thread for an after work laugh, keep the hacks coming please!
    Not much excitement on the jobsite today but I did have to hold a tile in place…

    Attachments:
    #473196

    How about this electrical box…overloaded and the wires are passing directly through the knock outs. No wire clamps used.

    Just waiting for the insulation to be be rubbed through so they can short out.

    Question: Would Arc fault breakers make up for badly flawed electrical work? Sort of a “if they don’t trip, must be ok” type of thing?

    I have ancient and sketchy wiring in my 1955 house, with only some grounding in place )the electrician who put it in originally cut back the copper ground instead of attaching it to anything.
    I grounded what I can, but there seem to be many old junction boxes buried in walls. Some of the ones I found don’t even have a cover plate, so they are exposed.

    Been fine since 55, but barring a full re-wiring of the house, it will stick around that way while we renovate – the garage, new bathrooms and kitchens are up to current code, but very little else is.

    Would GFCIs and Arc Breakers compensate for some of the crap in the walls – until I find and replace the bad electrical, of course?

    #473328

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Would GFCIs and Arc Breakers compensate for some of the crap in the walls – until I find and replace the bad electrical, of course?

    I’m not an electrician, but I don’t believe a GFCI would do anything unless it occurs Prior to the junction box in question. They cut current at and after the GFCI, which is typically just other outlets.

    Arc fault breakers have a bad reputation in my area because they can be temperamental. For a while, they were popular but apparently, they prematurely fail and have to be replaced.

    To be completely honest, I don’t know how they work…but under normal circumstances, a regular breaker would trip if something shorts out so I don’t see where an AFCI comes in.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #473350

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    This is my go to thread for an after work laugh, keep the hacks coming please!
    Not much excitement on the jobsite today but I did have to hold a tile in place…

    That looks very effective to me.What do you call it?

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #473369

    Doobie
    Moderator

    Would GFCIs and Arc Breakers compensate for some of the crap in the walls – until I find and replace the bad electrical, of course?

    It would help, but as Jon points out, it needs to be at the panel and GFCI breakers are pricey last time I looked into that. That was years ago. Prices may have changed since then.

    I think you have major electrical shortcomings by the sounds of it. People’s houses burn down for those kinds of things.

    If your roof was leaking, you’d fix it right? Youre electrical is leaking and instead of water damage, may cause the demise of your house or worse, yourselves!

    Food for thought Eric.

    #473372

    Clev08
    Pro

    This is my go to thread for an after work laugh, keep the hacks coming please!
    Not much excitement on the jobsite today but I did have to hold a tile in place…

    That looks very effective to me.What do you call it?

    The use whatever is in the room because it was zero degrees out and I didn’t want to go outside and cut a piece of wood to support it tile support 🙂

    #473418

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    The use whatever is in the room because it was zero degrees out and I didn’t want to go outside and cut a piece of wood to support it tile support

    I can see that. Good move, it worked.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #473433

    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    This is my go to thread for an after work laugh, keep the hacks coming please!
    Not much excitement on the jobsite today but I did have to hold a tile in place…

    That looks very effective to me.What do you call it?

    The use whatever is in the room because it was zero degrees out and I didn’t want to go outside and cut a piece of wood to support it tile support :)

    You do what you need to do to get it done. If the tile didn’t move you saved some steps. It’s called ingenuity.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

Viewing 20 posts - 261 through 280 (of 1,009 total)

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