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Tenant put grease in toilet

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  • #400698
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    When the tenant first came to me for help with his toilet that wouldn’t flush, I told him that something had to be in there and he will be charged for the plumber’s visit.

    He said wouldn’t it be better to get a new toilet? DUH!
    I told him that toilet WAS new!! I had installed it myself.

    And, a year after they had moved in, the kitchen lines had been so heavily clogged with grease that the plumber had to go on the roof to put degreaser down the vent pipe. It had cost me over $500.00 in damages. We had thought the grease was a buildup from many years. Now I know better. These idiots did it.

    Since they were now afraid to dispose of grease in the kitchen, they then started dumping it in the toilet.

    I’m going to charge them big time and warn them if it happens again, they’re getting evicted.

    I’d be fuming mad as well. What happens if they don’t pay the bill? Can you evict for that?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #400699

    We have a septic system out here in the boonies. We try not to put anything like that down the drain (bleach is bad too, it kills the bacteria that breaks down the waste). If we fry anything, we throw some paper towel in the pan to absorb it so it can go out with the garbage.

    How do septic system handle washing machine/dishwasher discharge? Or do those not go in the tank?

    There usually isn’t a problem with washing machines or dish washers. The detergents used in them are mild enough to go into a septic. There are some setups though that separate the grey water and discharge it elsewhere. Black water still goes into the septic

    Correct, ours goes into the septic system. We use very little bleach in the house. I also use a push mower. Lots of folks around here use lawn tractors and some have had vehicles drive over their weeping beds. There has been a some problems with a few too. They work great if you take care of them.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #400718
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Since they were now afraid to dispose of grease in the kitchen, they then started dumping it in the toilet.

    Give them a box of sandwich bags and tell them to put grease in one and throw out with garbage.

    #400719
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    We have a septic system out here in the boonies. We try not to put anything like that down the drain (bleach is bad too, it kills the bacteria that breaks down the waste). If we fry anything, we throw some paper towel in the pan to absorb it so it can go out with the garbage.

    How do septic system handle washing machine/dishwasher discharge? Or do those not go in the tank?

    There usually isn’t a problem with washing machines or dish washers. The detergents used in them are mild enough to go into a septic. There are some setups though that separate the grey water and discharge it elsewhere. Black water still goes into the septic

    Correct, ours goes into the septic system. We use very little bleach in the house. I also use a push mower. Lots of folks around here use lawn tractors and some have had vehicles drive over their weeping beds. There has been a some problems with a few too. They work great if you take care of them.

    Thanks, good to know. Sometimes I pour bleach in sink/drain to clean stuff, I’ll remember not to do that if I ever have septic system.

    #400721
    DesertDeuces
    Pro
    Indio, CA

    I’d be fuming mad as well. What happens if they don’t pay the bill? Can you evict for that?

    Yes, I can evict if they don’t pay the bill.

    So, I finished the job. I found this really nice RV tank rinser that I used to clear out the grease. It’s got a nice rotary jet head. Worked great.

    And, while I’m working, the dummy actually said that maybe it wasn’t grease but it was the wax ring. I showed him a new wax ring and said there’s absolutely no way that a wax ring would make such a gigantic clog. And, I showed him the old wax ring, which was a completely different color and doesn’t degrade.

    I mean, I could write a book about goofy tenants. It’s getting to the point where I just might do it.

    Pat

    #400759
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    It sounds like he was trying to pass the blame. Clearly a case of wax rings doesn’t just find its way into a waste line…

    @desertdeuces Please do write that book! I miss the stupidity of tenants (sometimes…). Or perhaps just start a thread about their infinite wisdom?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #400797
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Sometimes the people just don’t know about where or how to handle the waste grease. I think it should be covered it their move in handbook.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #400809
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    what a dummy! everyone knows you don’t flush grease away. With that much, i would definitely try to find smarter tennants.

    #400859
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Man I guess the tenant thought he had found a great way to get rid of grease. Glad you found a DIY solution.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #400888
    Toolshead
    Pro
    In the Rice Fields, South TX

    We have a septic system out here in the boonies. We try not to put anything like that down the drain (bleach is bad too, it kills the bacteria that breaks down the waste). If we fry anything, we throw some paper towel in the pan to absorb it so it can go out with the garbage.

    How do septic system handle washing machine/dishwasher discharge? Or do those not go in the tank?

    There usually isn’t a problem with washing machines or dish washers. The detergents used in them are mild enough to go into a septic. There are some setups though that separate the grey water and discharge it elsewhere. Black water still goes into the septic

    Correct, ours goes into the septic system. We use very little bleach in the house. I also use a push mower. Lots of folks around here use lawn tractors and some have had vehicles drive over their weeping beds. There has been a some problems with a few too. They work great if you take care of them.

    Septic systems can tolerate a surprisingly high continuous level of soaps in addition to moderate amounts of household cleaners. The amount of bleach used in loads of household laundry or prettying up the stains in a sink won’t put a dent in the number of available bacteria in a properly designed septic system. An undersized system could be challenged though by trying to run a commercial laundry or by pouring down diaper pails (remember them?) of bleach water.
    Grease is different story through a number of mechanisms. Liquid grease solidifies when the temperature drops, falls out of solution, and cakes onto the pipes. Anything else in the pipes gets caught up and binds with it – rust from pipes, food residue particles, coffee grounds, etc.
    In my area, a grease trap is the first tank in the effluent line from the kitchen. It’s nothing more than a small diameter (24″?) deep (4′?) tank that allows grease to adhere to the walls or float. The discharge to the rest of the system is taken well below the water/grease interface level. It is pumped out independently from the rest of the system to avoid carryover. Though a nasty job, a HO can clean out his own with a shovel and a strong stomach.
    We keep a tin can between the stove and sink to put burger and cooking grease in. It goes in a plastic grocery bag and out with the week’s trash. For something like veggie oil after frying, after it’s cool it goes in a milk jug. Residue gets wiped out with a paper towel.
    Some oils will inevitably get by, but not in quantities large enough to foul the pipes or the system bacteria.
    The leach field should be deep enough that any lawn mower won’t affect it – a full sized tractor, car, or large equipment can cause problems. Neighbor had problems after a tree trimming crew spent a couple of days driving over his with a bucket truck, and pick ups with trailers full of tree trunks. I presume systems are deeper where there’s a freeze line?

    #400911

    We have a septic system out here in the boonies. We try not to put anything like that down the drain (bleach is bad too, it kills the bacteria that breaks down the waste). If we fry anything, we throw some paper towel in the pan to absorb it so it can go out with the garbage.

    How do septic system handle washing machine/dishwasher discharge? Or do those not go in the tank?

    There usually isn’t a problem with washing machines or dish washers. The detergents used in them are mild enough to go into a septic. There are some setups though that separate the grey water and discharge it elsewhere. Black water still goes into the septic

    Correct, ours goes into the septic system. We use very little bleach in the house. I also use a push mower. Lots of folks around here use lawn tractors and some have had vehicles drive over their weeping beds. There has been a some problems with a few too. They work great if you take care of them.

    Septic systems can tolerate a surprisingly high continuous level of soaps in addition to moderate amounts of household cleaners. The amount of bleach used in loads of household laundry or prettying up the stains in a sink won’t put a dent in the number of available bacteria in a properly designed septic system. An undersized system could be challenged though by trying to run a commercial laundry or by pouring down diaper pails (remember them?) of bleach water.
    Grease is different story through a number of mechanisms. Liquid grease solidifies when the temperature drops, falls out of solution, and cakes onto the pipes. Anything else in the pipes gets caught up and binds with it – rust from pipes, food residue particles, coffee grounds, etc.
    In my area, a grease trap is the first tank in the effluent line from the kitchen. It’s nothing more than a small diameter (24″?) deep (4’?) tank that allows grease to adhere to the walls or float. The discharge to the rest of the system is taken well below the water/grease interface level. It is pumped out independently from the rest of the system to avoid carryover. Though a nasty job, a HO can clean out his own with a shovel and a strong stomach.
    We keep a tin can between the stove and sink to put burger and cooking grease in. It goes in a plastic grocery bag and out with the week’s trash. For something like veggie oil after frying, after it’s cool it goes in a milk jug. Residue gets wiped out with a paper towel.
    Some oils will inevitably get by, but not in quantities large enough to foul the pipes or the system bacteria.
    The leach field should be deep enough that any lawn mower won’t affect it – a full sized tractor, car, or large equipment can cause problems. Neighbor had problems after a tree trimming crew spent a couple of days driving over his with a bucket truck, and pick ups with trailers full of tree trunks. I presume systems are deeper where there’s a freeze line?

    Ours are shallow and small here. They were put in without regulation and cheaply. To clarify, we are in a mobile home park with 38 lots out in rural south western Ontario. So, we try to be careful as we know the quality of work that goes into anything the landowners (former and present) do. One lot had to have the whole system replaced this year (only after it was ordered by the health unit), and that requires a permit now. So that place likely has the best system around here. Probably the only one sized and built correctly. At least they have it deep enough and some gravel in the weeping bed. One place had the tank so shallow that the frost heaved it up and broke the connection to the house. Took them a couple of years to figure that one out. Another place has to get it’s tank pumped a few times every year. Something isn’t right there, but the landowner keeps paying to have it pumped instead of fixing it.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #400928
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    That’s terrible Pat. I think my last tenant was dumping grease in the kitchen sink. I had to snake the line and flush it a few times to get it open after I tossed him out.
    I dump our cooking grease in my compost bin, the worms love it

    #400958
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Sometimes the people just don’t know about where or how to handle the waste grease. I think it should be covered it their move in handbook.

    what a dummy! everyone knows you don’t flush grease away. With that much, i would definitely try to find smarter tennants.

    I didn’t know you couldn’t do that til shortly after buying my house 15 years ago and my wife telling me.

    I lived in apt buildings most of my life and just dumped grease down the drain and never had a problem. Was never advised not to. Unless someone tells you, people may just not know otherwise.

    a year after they had moved in, the kitchen lines had been so heavily clogged with grease that the plumber had to go on the roof to put degreaser down the vent pipe. It had cost me over $500.00 in damages. We had thought the grease was a buildup from many years. Now I know better. These idiots did it.

    Since they were now afraid to dispose of grease in the kitchen, they then started dumping it in the toilet.

    In your case Pat, they should have known better after the first incident. There’s no excuse for the second time around. A purely deliberate attempt to avoid dealing with grease properly.

    #401032
    DesertDeuces
    Pro
    Indio, CA

    @jponto07: Good idea. I think I will start that thread!

    @DirtyWhiteBoy: yes, I agree that some people don’t know how to handle waste, and it is covered in their rental contract already.

    @r-ice: Based on the many stupid problems I’ve encountered, I told my daughter that I need to add a line to the rental application: If you have an IQ greater than 50, you do not qualify to rent here.

    The thing is, I can deal with the mess and get it repaired, but I cannot stand people lying about it to my face. That’s what really sent me through the roof.

    Pat

    #401035
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Grease disposal isn’t difficult. The more I think about it, the more I need to know what the heck they were cooking that generated so much grease!

    I dump my grease into a 32 oz yogurt container and toss it in the trash can when its full….which usually takes months. How did these people generate enough grease to back up a 4″ waste line?

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #401036

    Grease disposal isn’t difficult. The more I think about it, the more I need to know what the heck they were cooking that generated so much grease!

    I dump my grease into a 32 oz yogurt container and toss it in the trash can when its full….which usually takes months. How did these people generate enough grease to back up a 4″ waste line?

    I can’t remember the last time I even had grease to dispose of. I keep bacon grease in a mason jar for future cooking, and thats really the only grease made from my cooking.

    #401038
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Based on the many stupid problems I’ve encountered, I told my daughter that I need to add a line to the rental application: If you have an IQ greater than 50, you do not qualify to rent here.

    You might want to reconsider that metric. IQ somewhere around the 70’s or lower is considered mentally challenged (formerly known as being retarded), 100 is supposedly average intelligence.

    #401045
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Based on the many stupid problems I’ve encountered, I told my daughter that I need to add a line to the rental application: If you have an IQ greater than 50, you do not qualify to rent here.

    You might want to reconsider that metric. IQ somewhere around the 70’s or lower is considered mentally challenged (formerly known as being retarded), 100 is supposedly average intelligence.

    I think she was implying that they Must only accept the less intelligent based upon the problems they cause. The specific IQ number was just a shot in the dark.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #401057
    DesertDeuces
    Pro
    Indio, CA

    Based on the many stupid problems I’ve encountered, I told my daughter that I need to add a line to the rental application: If you have an IQ greater than 50, you do not qualify to rent here.

    You might want to reconsider that metric. IQ somewhere around the 70’s or lower is considered mentally challenged (formerly known as being retarded), 100 is supposedly average intelligence.

    Yes, what I was saying is that I’ve encountered such mind-bogglingly dumb problems here that it seems that I might as well say if you’re intelligent, you don’t qualify to live here. Just a tongue-in-cheek statement.

    Pat

    #401059
    DesertDeuces
    Pro
    Indio, CA

    Grease disposal isn’t difficult. The more I think about it, the more I need to know what the heck they were cooking that generated so much grease!

    The tenants are of a culture that cooks mainly with lard, I trust that is what was in the toilet.

    It’s not a cultural thing for people to toss lard into drains, because there are many families here of the same culture as the ones who did it. Nobody else who lives here has done it.

    Pat

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