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Tapcon Installation

Viewing 15 posts - 21 through 35 (of 35 total)
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  • #729928
    Clev08
    Pro

    I am the opposite, I religiously avoid running the bit in and out of the holes I drill. I blow out the dust unless it’s drilling up into a ceiling.

    I don’t remember ever having trouble driving the screws in whether it’s solid concrete or blocks.

    May be about 5% of the holes I drill in blocks I end up with spinning screws. Once that happens then it’s the electrical wire trick. If that doesn’t work then I either drill a new hole or I upsize the screw a little. Simpson’s has a concrete screw size that a little bigger than 1/4″ that use 1/4″ bit, that may bite into holes drilled for Tapcon 3/16″ bit that’s too loose for their 1/4″ screws.

    The electrical wire trick? Is that like putting tooth picks or a golf tee in a wood hole? But wire in a concrete hole for the screw to wedge into?

    Zip ties work well also if the hold you are not looking for is structural. a single layer or two of a zip tie will make the screw grab extremely well.

    Thanks for the zip tie idea/tip. Have to remember that one.

    I’ll have to remember this tip as well, as I always have zip ties in my truck but not electrical wire.

    #730053
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    I am the opposite, I religiously avoid running the bit in and out of the holes I drill. I blow out the dust unless it’s drilling up into a ceiling.

    I don’t remember ever having trouble driving the screws in whether it’s solid concrete or blocks.

    May be about 5% of the holes I drill in blocks I end up with spinning screws. Once that happens then it’s the electrical wire trick. If that doesn’t work then I either drill a new hole or I upsize the screw a little. Simpson’s has a concrete screw size that a little bigger than 1/4″ that use 1/4″ bit, that may bite into holes drilled for Tapcon 3/16″ bit that’s too loose for their 1/4″ screws.

    The electrical wire trick? Is that like putting tooth picks or a golf tee in a wood hole? But wire in a concrete hole for the screw to wedge into?

    Zip ties work well also if the hold you are not looking for is structural. a single layer or two of a zip tie will make the screw grab extremely well.

    Thanks for the zip tie idea/tip. Have to remember that one.

    I’ll have to remember this tip as well, as I always have zip ties in my truck but not electrical wire.

    I keep a small amount of wire in my dash as I slowly pile it up to take to the metal recycle center – if I ever run into this problem, I’ll be glad to know that tip!

    Charlie
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    #730079
    Doobie
    Moderator

    My only concern, and I’m probably over thinking this, is if jaming a disimilar metal up against the Tapcon, is there not a possibility of corrosion over time with the electrostatic effect – or whatever they call that – of two different metals up against each other?

    #730085
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    My only concern, and I’m probably over thinking this, is if jaming a disimilar metal up against the Tapcon, is there not a possibility of corrosion over time with the electrostatic effect – or whatever they call that – of two different metals up against each other?

    I would think the coating that protects the tapcon from rusting from the corrosive properties of the concrete would probably be enough to stave that off too.

    Charlie
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    #730509
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    My only concern, and I’m probably over thinking this, is if jaming a disimilar metal up against the Tapcon, is there not a possibility of corrosion over time with the electrostatic effect – or whatever they call that – of two different metals up against each other?

    You are thinking of galvanic action. Two dissimilar metal against each other could cause it, but in the presence of an electrolyte, in this case water. So unless the Tapcon and wire will be submersed for a prolonged period of time inside the concrete, it’s probably not as big an issue like connecting copper fittings to galvanized iron water lines, or connecting copper to steel nipples on a water heater.

    Note that whether it’s zip ties, wires, tooth picks, it’s not a structural fix. If possible I would drill a new hole and the “fixed” one becomes supplemental if it’s a heavy support. On the other hand, if it’s strapping a conduit or pipe along a masonry wall, then the Tapcon is used only for the hole straps then I don’t worry about using these workarounds.

    #730511
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I would think the coating that protects the tapcon from rusting from the corrosive properties of the concrete would probably be enough to stave that off too.

    The coating on Tapcon is not very good.

    I have had plenty of Tapcon head corrosion. That enamel coating could wear if you use an impact driver to really crank it hard (which is one reason why the screw spins too). You drill that hole, blow the dust out, if it’s a hex head you put a nut driver on if and drive it in, in the process strips the coating off the head, then if it get rained on like we do here in South Florida it will come corrode. That’s why when I drive Tapcon I set my driver to lower power, or I drive it till it till it almost bottoms, then hand tight carefully until it’s snug and not more. Overcranking could cause it to loosen and spin when the threads are cutting in the same spot, and could also strip the coating.

    #730550

    I would think the coating that protects the tapcon from rusting from the corrosive properties of the concrete would probably be enough to stave that off too.

    The coating on Tapcon is not very good.

    I have had plenty of Tapcon head corrosion. That enamel coating could wear if you use an impact driver to really crank it hard (which is one reason why the screw spins too). You drill that hole, blow the dust out, if it’s a hex head you put a nut driver on if and drive it in, in the process strips the coating off the head, then if it get rained on like we do here in South Florida it will come corrode. That’s why when I drive Tapcon I set my driver to lower power, or I drive it till it till it almost bottoms, then hand tight carefully until it’s snug and not more. Overcranking could cause it to loosen and spin when the threads are cutting in the same spot, and could also strip the coating.

    Totally agree with you the coating comes off to easy when really cracking down on the screw . I let a box get filled with water the box of tapcons rusted to hell .

    Always willing to learn .

    #730579

    Missed this. I’ve had similar problems with tapcons.
    They will either stop or snap
    I usually try to make sure I drill easily deeper than required length , and never use those cheap bits that comes with them , I’ve had good luck with the Bosch blue granite bits.
    I don’t have the dust extractor on my drill , so I usually try to vacuum them out. I should try the Bosch blower with the attachment for clearing out holes.

    #730659
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    Missed this. I’ve had similar problems with tapcons.
    They will either stop or snap
    I usually try to make sure I drill easily deeper than required length , and never use those cheap bits that comes with them , I’ve had good luck with the Bosch blue granite bits.
    I don’t have the dust extractor on my drill , so I usually try to vacuum them out. I should try the Bosch blower with the attachment for clearing out holes.

    I’ve never had one snap – what are you using to install them? I use my IDH182, and typically the 1/4″ Tapcons.

    Charlie
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    #730664

    Missed this. I’ve had similar problems with tapcons.
    They will either stop or snap
    I usually try to make sure I drill easily deeper than required length , and never use those cheap bits that comes with them , I’ve had good luck with the Bosch blue granite bits.
    I don’t have the dust extractor on my drill , so I usually try to vacuum them out. I should try the Bosch blower with the attachment for clearing out holes.

    I’ve never had one snap – what are you using to install them? I use my IDH182, and typically the 1/4″ Tapcons.

    Usually impact with the 1/4 or 5/16 inch magnet head
    And also the square head ,I actually snapped a Bosch impact square head tip on installing some tapcons.

    #730950
    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    Missed this. I’ve had similar problems with tapcons.
    They will either stop or snap
    I usually try to make sure I drill easily deeper than required length , and never use those cheap bits that comes with them , I’ve had good luck with the Bosch blue granite bits.
    I don’t have the dust extractor on my drill , so I usually try to vacuum them out. I should try the Bosch blower with the attachment for clearing out holes.

    I’ve never had one snap – what are you using to install them? I use my IDH182, and typically the 1/4″ Tapcons.

    Usually impact with the 1/4 or 5/16 inch magnet head
    And also the square head ,I actually snapped a Bosch impact square head tip on installing some tapcons.

    That’s pretty impressive. I’ve snapped the tips off a bunch of Phillips bits, but I’ve yet to have a square bit break on me.

    Charlie
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    #747299

    Installing Tapcon Concrete Screws can be done in few easy steps and can be used when working with electrical boxes, wood headers, and other exterior insulation systems. Tapcons are best matched for light to medium duty fastening purposes, are available in standard 3/16” and 1/4” diameters, as well as large diameter size varieties of 3/8”, 1/2″, 5/8” and 3/4” and, are offered in an extensive variety of materials (including the stainless steel) to meet every construction need. After installation, they can be removed and replaced without disturbing the base material.
    1. Select an appropriate size of a masonry screw.
    2. Choose a drill bit. Place drill bit and screw together. Use Tape to wrap at a point equal to the size of a size, so that you may not drill a deeper than the actual size of a screw.
    3. Drill a hole into the base material.
    4. Clean out the hole of all the debris.
    5. Insert pointed end of masonry screw into the base material and drive slowly with a slight push force so that threads are fixed into the base material.

    #747995
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Use Tape to wrap at a point equal to the size of a size, so that you may not drill a deeper than the actual size of a screw.

    Actually, if you read Tapcon’s own documentation, they recommend you make a hole slightly deeper then the screw itself. This is because even if you clean out all the concrete dust made from the drilling, as you drive the Tapcon screw in, the screw itself is “self tapping” into the hole, creating new concrete dust as you drive the screw in, and if the hole is only as deep as the screw, the new dust settled at the bottom may prevent the screw from bottoming. This is also why while Tapcon screws can be reused, a hole cannot be reused once you backed a Tapcon out.

    #748000
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Use Tape to wrap at a point equal to the size of a size, so that you may not drill a deeper than the actual size of a screw.

    Actually, if you read Tapcon’s own documentation, they recommend you make a hole slightly deeper then the screw itself. This is because even if you clean out all the concrete dust made from the drilling, as you drive the Tapcon screw in, the screw itself is “self tapping” into the hole, creating new concrete dust as you drive the screw in, and if the hole is only as deep as the screw, the new dust settled at the bottom may prevent the screw from bottoming. This is also why while Tapcon screws can be reused, a hole cannot be reused once you backed a Tapcon out.

    This is what I’ve understood and done as well.

    #748012

    Use Tape to wrap at a point equal to the size of a size, so that you may not drill a deeper than the actual size of a screw.

    Actually, if you read Tapcon’s own documentation, they recommend you make a hole slightly deeper then the screw itself. This is because even if you clean out all the concrete dust made from the drilling, as you drive the Tapcon screw in, the screw itself is “self tapping” into the hole, creating new concrete dust as you drive the screw in, and if the hole is only as deep as the screw, the new dust settled at the bottom may prevent the screw from bottoming. This is also why while Tapcon screws can be reused, a hole cannot be reused once you backed a Tapcon out.

    This is what I’ve understood and done as well.

    Boy it’s been years I’ve been doing it like that , always deeper than the screw , I don’t even know if I looked at the tapcons documentation about that , I can’t even remember how long ago I started using tapcons 🤷‍♂️ , I guess I’m kinda showing my age lol

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