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Subs borrowing your tools

Viewing 20 posts - 61 through 80 (of 128 total)
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  • #374647
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    I don’t lend tools to anyone but @58chev, as I know he is probably the only one that will treat the tools right.

    That is clearly, blatantly, sucking up to the FIL, but, I know what you mean. A couple of friends and my father have full run of my tools. Nobody else gets near them. Neighbours who ask to borrow something tend to get me coming along to do the task myself and take the tool with me when I go.

    I did hold onto some very low end stuff from when I first moved out and had no cash – keep it around for jobs that need disposable. Neighbours can borrow those. I find out who brings them back. If the old b&d nicad doesn’t make its way home, I will be glad for the extra space. Same with some Jobmate screwdrivers, Skil jigsaw and garage sale relics (stuff that had restoration potential, but didn’t work out as worth fixing up)

    On the other end, One neighbour asked to borrow a hand plane to shave down a slight swelling in his door. I gave him an old, rusted, sharp piece of scrap (the handyman budget line Stanley #5) that I keep sharp but not much else. Told him I haven’t gotten around to restoring it. He used it, and brought it back about a week later. It was gleaming. No rust anywhere, not a nick, freshly re sharpened, and the bottom had been flattened and polished. He actually apologized for not doing anything with the Japaning

    That guy has just earned the right to borrow any of my stuff.

    But borrowing without asking, and asking for stuff anyone should own, especially in a pro setting, is unacceptable.

    lol I gotta do that, I still have tons to learn from him. i’ve had quite a few people ask to borrow my tools. As you said I will end them the lower quality ones or ones I know how to fix easily. However my new Rotary Hammer drill, heck no. lol.

    #374747
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I don’t care if the property owner knew him prior to his or not. I fired his ass right there. He left a big mess yesterday and managed to come LESS prepared than yesterday! If you were wondering….YES he actually does have a license…..how the heck?!

    I think we could all see that one coming. One can only take so much, and the fact you were venting via this thread you started, you just needed one more ‘straw’ to hit the breaking point. Don’t blame you one bit!

    That’s the way it started out… After several responses from you guys I decided to give him the benefit of the doubt and see what happened the next day. When he didn’t have his stuff on day 2, it was a done deal.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #374790
    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    Good move Jon – if he didn’t care enough about the project to bring the tools he needed how good of a job was he actually doing? Didn’t the guy have a work vehicle with his tools in it?

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #374792
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Didn’t the guy have a work vehicle with his tools in it?

    Sounds like a trunk-slammer.

    #374801
    AndyG
    Pro

    It does utopia!

    #374802

    I can understand something uncommon or just real quick if the guy asks and gives it back. With the trades I work with a lot we borrow each others tools for something small here or there or just for convenience but we have worked together a long time and understand that if its to much we give each other shit and go grab our own tools. Just the way it is.

    #374806
    jaydee
    Pro
    Spencer, Ma., happy 2015

    for me, It depends on the sub, our relationship and what they are borrowing.
    usually no big deal AS long as the tool RETURNS

    #374823

    I think people should be bringing their own tools to the job sites. If it happens to break when they’re using it are they going to fix/replace it or put it back and hope you didn’t notice they borrowed it

    #374834
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Didn’t the guy have a work vehicle with his tools in it?

    Sounds like a trunk-slammer.

    Honda civic…

    To be fair, I drive a Subaru Outback, but I can jam tons of tools in it!…and I have many times!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #374841
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    So first time he had some tool, and the second day he had none? I guess he figured since you didn’t object to him helping himself the first time, he could get away with more eh?

    #374845
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Honda civic…

    A guy doing this part time and driving a Honda is hardly a pro. I thought we were talking about a professional contractor here. Sorry, but this type of stuff is to be expected from the trunk-slammer. If one isn’t serious enough about the trade to have a truck and the tools, one shouldn’t be taking on jobs.

    #374850
    AndyG
    Pro

    Some guys wake up everyday and its a new beginnimg… No memory of what they were doing and need to accomplish, let alone the tools .

    I’m always impressed, regardless of what life has thrown at someone , if they organize and care for tools . I know an incredible cabinet installer who works out of a Monte Carlo. Imagine if he could carry all the tools he needed….he’d be unstoppable.

    #374874
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Maybe he was trying to get fired. Do you think that might have been possible Jon?

    #374902

    Even though he got fired a guy like that may not even care. Just like he didn’t care enough to bring his own tools.

    #374947
    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    Honda civic…

    A guy doing this part time and driving a Honda is hardly a pro. I thought we were talking about a professional contractor here. Sorry, but this type of stuff is to be expected from the trunk-slammer. If one isn’t serious enough about the trade to have a truck and the tools, one shouldn’t be taking on jobs.

    Damn skippy.

    I don’t care what someone drives as an employee, but if you’re in business, you should act like it.

    Delta

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #374956
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Maybe he was trying to get fired. Do you think that might have been possible Jon?

    I’d like to think not. Since this happened, I’ve learned that he owes the building owner money and was “working it off”. Under those circumstances, I would have done about Anything to take care of business…and he did just the opposite.

    Honda civic…

    A guy doing this part time and driving a Honda is hardly a pro. I thought we were talking about a professional contractor here. Sorry, but this type of stuff is to be expected from the trunk-slammer. If one isn’t serious enough about the trade to have a truck and the tools, one shouldn’t be taking on jobs.

    Damn skippy.

    I don’t care what someone drives as an employee, but if you’re in business, you should act like it.

    Delta

    Okay, honest opinion….does it make me less legit because I drive an SUV, not a truck? I’m still fairly new at the working solo thing, and have spent a good amount of time under someone else’s employ. The work has never been a problem, but pricing, estimating time jobs take, ect have been tough. Because of that, I don’t think I’ve been as profitable as I could have been. I already have legions of tools…but a truck is still on the wish list.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #374961
    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    Absolutely not, in my opinion.

    If you have a rig, pickup, van, suv, whatever, that lets you get the job done, that’s good.

    Someone who can’t even carry tools, and then refuses to do so, is unprofessional in my opinion.

    Someone just starting out won’t have all the fancy gear that someone doing it for 20 years will have, but if he makes an effort, that’s what matters.

    Doing it part time is fine as well, as long as he takes it seriously.

    Delta

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #374968
    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    I agree with Seven Delta – your vehicle does not make you a pro. Your attitude, skill, and readiness do – when I started out my work truck was a rusty ’78 Chevy truck with a beat up contractor cap stuck on it.

    You can be the utmost professional while driving an outback but…the right vehicle will make you appear more professional to your customers. In my opinion most customers do not like to see a contractor driving a vehicle that:

    Is a POS
    Is an unorganized mess
    Doesn’t fit what they think a contractors rig should be.

    First appearances make a lasting impression – one of the first things most prospective clients see is your vehicle pulling in their drive way.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #374976
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I agree with Seven Delta – your vehicle does not make you a pro. Your attitude, skill, and readiness do – when I started out my work truck was a rusty ’78 Chevy truck with a beat up contractor cap stuck on it.

    You can be the utmost professional while driving an outback but…the right vehicle will make you appear more professional to your customers. In my opinion most customers do not like to see a contractor driving a vehicle that:

    Is a POS
    Is an unorganized mess
    Doesn’t fit what they think a contractors rig should be.

    First appearances make a lasting impression – one of the first things most prospective clients see is your vehicle pulling in their drive way.

    You make a good point, and I’ve wondered what clients might think of my Outback as well. On the flip side, I make every effort to keep them happy, and I’d like to think that a more efficient vehicle would be appreciated by clients as well. I still feel like a truck is something I’d like to own though. It would make life easier in many circumstances and eliminate preconceived notions that I’m not a serious contractor.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #374984
    Youngin
    Pro
    Edmonton, AB

    It’s odd I see a lot of electricians working out of SUVs. I used to own a truck for my own uses. Too many employers took one look at it and assumed it was now part of their fleet though. I’m back to a small SUV now.

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