dcsimg

Strip Built Kayak Build

This topic contains 80 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by  wbembrid 5 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 61 through 80 (of 81 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #677981

    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Thanks everyone. Greg, I am just tracking hours that I spend working directly on this project. I spend time in the shop doing other stuff, but I only record the time I spend on this project.

    Today I was able to get some time in the shop to work on the forms that will be attached to the end forms. These will go 6 inches and 1 foot from the front and back of the boat. They are the 8 little pieces seen in the pic.

    The end forms are the next order of business. Like all the other forms, they will not be part of the finished boat, but I want them to taper on the edges. As instructed by the Schade book and videos, I am making a tapered stem that will fit on the end form and end up being part of the finished boat. I’m just using some scrap pine that I had lying around, but nonetheless it is the first actual piece of wood that will be part of the finished boat!! I planed it down to 1/2 inch wide and made some templates out of mdf (see pics). It feels exciting to be getting close to some actual woodworking.

    Next steps (after tapering the end stems) will be marking out form locations on the strongback. Total time now is at 18.5 hours. Almost half a work week.

    Thanks, as always, for reading and commenting.

    Really good to see some actual boat parts. Can’t wait for it to begin taking shape.

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #678016

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Really good to see some actual boat parts. Can’t wait for it to begin taking shape.

    For sure.

    I am not sure how the forms will come out after all is said and done. Nick says that he often doesn’t bother with reusing forms since they end up kind of beat up from the process, but it definitely would be faster the second time around since I already have the plans drawn up and the strongback made. Thanks for reading!

    #678042

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Today’s work focused on getting the pine end stems cut and completed. The job is not done but I made good progress that I am happy with. The mdf stems I cut and shaped in the customary manner (bandsaw then OSS down to the line). Then after tracing onto the pine I cut the bottom side of each on the bandsaw and shaped down on the sander.
    After that I used my block plane to bevel the pine pieces down to the midline on both sides, creating a “V” shape in profile. Once done with that I could cut the back side off and again smooth to the line with the sander once more. Really getting my money’s worth out of that tool on this project so far.

    I got one done (the bow) all the way. Should take me about a half hour to finish up the other one the same way. Upcoming. I can’t tell you how good it felt to be working with real, solid wood again. I’ve been missing it with all this mdf and plywood that the project has demanded so far.

    #678065

    Clev08
    Pro

    It’s crazy how much time is spent setting up a build like that. My uncle spent about 9 months making two wood kayaks. How many hours do you think you are going to spend on this by the time you are all done?

    #678072

    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Today’s work focused on getting the pine end stems cut and completed. The job is not done but I made good progress that I am happy with. The mdf stems I cut and shaped in the customary manner (bandsaw then OSS down to the line). Then after tracing onto the pine I cut the bottom side of each on the bandsaw and shaped down on the sander.
    After that I used my block plane to bevel the pine pieces down to the midline on both sides, creating a “V” shape in profile. Once done with that I could cut the back side off and again smooth to the line with the sander once more. Really getting my money’s worth out of that tool on this project so far.

    I got one done (the bow) all the way. Should take me about a half hour to finish up the other one the same way. Upcoming. I can’t tell you how good it felt to be working with real, solid wood again. I’ve been missing it with all this mdf and plywood that the project has demanded so far.

    I can imagine the excitement from working with an actual boat part.

    I assume these will be internal parts, covered by the strips. How do you know the angle is correct for the strips to bed properly or do you correct the angle as you add strips?

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #678086

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Congrats on getting to make actual boat parts. Progress being made.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #678132

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Thanks fellas.

    It’s crazy how much time is spent setting up a build like that. My uncle spent about 9 months making two wood kayaks. How many hours do you think you are going to spend on this by the time you are all done?

    Honestly I have no idea. I feel like I’ve heard Nick say between 150 and 250 for the first one, with subsequent ones a bit faster. Also probably depends on the tools available and your tolerance for things being less than perfect.

    I assume these will be internal parts, covered by the strips. How do you know the angle is correct for the strips to bed properly or do you correct the angle as you add strips?

    Yes, these will be internal stems. The strips will be glued to them as I strip up the boat. They will also be eventually cut in half to separate the deck from the hull. They provide internal support for the ends of the strips. They also do allow for a slightly less severe angle on the interior of the boat when it comes time to do fiberglassing. Fiberglassing feels like it’s light-years away at this point.
    The plans I’m following provide a place for the taper to start, so that’s the size of the piece I cut. The angle changes through its length slightly, with a sharper point where the material is thickest. The plans were drawn for 1/2″ thickness, which is what I’m using. If I’d used thicker forms I’d have had to make these parts a bit wider. The prospect of changing his plans severely overwhelms me at this point.

    Thanks for commenting and asking everyone! More to come!

    #678135

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    Thanks everyone. Greg, I am just tracking hours that I spend working directly on this project. I spend time in the shop doing other stuff, but I only record the time I spend on this project.

    Today I was able to get some time in the shop to work on the forms that will be attached to the end forms. These will go 6 inches and 1 foot from the front and back of the boat. They are the 8 little pieces seen in the pic.

    The end forms are the next order of business. Like all the other forms, they will not be part of the finished boat, but I want them to taper on the edges. As instructed by the Schade book and videos, I am making a tapered stem that will fit on the end form and end up being part of the finished boat. I’m just using some scrap pine that I had lying around, but nonetheless it is the first actual piece of wood that will be part of the finished boat!! I planed it down to 1/2 inch wide and made some templates out of mdf (see pics). It feels exciting to be getting close to some actual woodworking.

    Next steps (after tapering the end stems) will be marking out form locations on the strongback. Total time now is at 18.5 hours. Almost half a work week.

    Thanks, as always, for reading and commenting.

    Ok thank you. I was wondering is including hours when you have to extra to figure something out. I am learning from this as know about boats.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #678231

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    The prospect of changing his plans severely overwhelms me at this point.

    Best to stick with the plans on the first one to get it all figured out and see how it goes together.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #678261

    Awesome work, you are doing a great job of documenting, which I truly appreciate.

    Will

    #678262

    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    The plans I’m following provide a place for the taper to start, so that’s the size of the piece I cut. The angle changes through its length slightly, with a sharper point where the material is thickest. The plans were drawn for 1/2″ thickness, which is what I’m using. If I’d used thicker forms I’d have had to make these parts a bit wider. The prospect of changing his plans severely overwhelms me at this point.

    Ok, I think I understand that better now. Good idea for easing the interior fibreglass, too.

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #688061

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    @mrfid how’s the boat coming along?

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

    #688556

    yellaD
    Pro

    If you can somehow get the blueprint into SketchUp or CAD/CAM software, you could tweak stuff easier. To try to modify the original plan sounds like a headache.

    #712258

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Well hello there.

    It has been quite a while since I’ve been here. I do apologize for that, and I know that this forum is quite stale at this point, but I am hoping to revive it for the moment, and when I really start working in the spring to be updating much more often again.
    The kayak has gone through fits and spurts of activity. Pics coming at the end of this. From where it looks like I last posted an update, I’ve made some good progress on the boat. I spent a while this fall and early winter attaching each form at its proper location along the strongback. I worked from the central forms outwards towards the bow, and then backwards from midship to the stern. I drew some guiding lines to keep each form aligned with the previous ones as suggested in the book. Of importance are the DWL (datum water line) and the centerline. These must align otherwise the boat will have strange undulations. The technique that I found worked best was to hold each form against the blocking and sight towards the middle, making sure all those lines were aligned. Then, without moving the form at all, shoot three or four 23G pins through the form holding it to the blocks. Once I verified that the location was correct for the form, I’d secure it more permanently with drywall screws into the blocks.
    For now, I am in a bit of a holding pattern since my next step will be to rip the cedar I bought into 1/4 by 3/4 inch strips. Story coming about the cedar. Thanks for reading, and again I apologize for being so slack with my updates on this project for the past while. A few things got in the way of the kayak work last summer and I just couldn’t find much time to put into the boat build.

    #712265

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Over the summer I was able to find time to get to Liberty Cedar in Kingstown RI. It’s about an hour and a half from my house, but only about 30 mins from a place where I spend time in the summer, so I took my son one day when we were down in RI and went to pay them a visit. A very impressive place. I walked away with two 20 foot long boards of clear vertical grain Western Red Cedar, 2×8, which is ideal for boat building. I also bought a 12 foot long piece in case of emergencies (and I’m sure there will be plenty of those).
    My big task was how to get a 20 foot board from RI to my home in MA. I have a small truck (Honda Ridgeline), but 20 feet was a lot. After some thought, I used my bed extender in vertical position to create a pseudo Thule style roof bar behind the bed of the truck. This worked great, but I knew I didn’t want to simply rest the lumber on the roof of my truck for two hours on the highway. So I made a ghetto-style Thule rack for myself out of some spare scrap lumber and some black iron pipe I use for pipe clamps. I padded the bottom of each pad with minicel foam carved to fit onto the roof of my truck. I can report that it was louder than a Thile rack would have been, but it held the lumber just the same. Total cost = $10, or whatever the minicel was on Amazon.
    I plan to rip these boards down (they’re hanging in my garage for the moment) once the weather gets nicer. To rip them you need 20 feet in front of and behind the saw, and my shop is not 40 feet long 🙁
    So for now the strongback hangs in my garage, and the lumber too. I am excited for the weather to turn so that I can start stripping up the boat. See pics for my unique lumber transport system.

    #712287

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    Over the summer I was able to find time to get to Liberty Cedar in Kingstown RI. It’s about an hour and a half from my house, but only about 30 mins from a place where I spend time in the summer, so I took my son one day when we were down in RI and went to pay them a visit. A very impressive place. I walked away with two 20 foot long boards of clear vertical grain Western Red Cedar, 2×8, which is ideal for boat building. I also bought a 12 foot long piece in case of emergencies (and I’m sure there will be plenty of those).
    My big task was how to get a 20 foot board from RI to my home in MA. I have a small truck (Honda Ridgeline), but 20 feet was a lot. After some thought, I used my bed extender in vertical position to create a pseudo Thule style roof bar behind the bed of the truck. This worked great, but I knew I didn’t want to simply rest the lumber on the roof of my truck for two hours on the highway. So I made a ghetto-style Thule rack for myself out of some spare scrap lumber and some black iron pipe I use for pipe clamps. I padded the bottom of each pad with minicel foam carved to fit onto the roof of my truck. I can report that it was louder than a Thile rack would have been, but it held the lumber just the same. Total cost = $10, or whatever the minicel was on Amazon.
    I plan to rip these boards down (they’re hanging in my garage for the moment) once the weather gets nicer. To rip them you need 20 feet in front of and behind the saw, and my shop is not 40 feet long 🙁
    So for now the strongback hangs in my garage, and the lumber too. I am excited for the weather to turn so that I can start stripping up the boat. See pics for my unique lumber transport system.

    I love that – nice solution! Carrying long boards is a tricky deal, so much could go wrong and who wants to ruin such beautiful lumber!

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

    #712302

    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    Sweet ! I once drove thru Atlanta with 40′ gutters strapped on a stake bed truck.

    #712327

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Nice to see the project is continuing.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #712339

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Yeah it’s good to be back here. The daylight around here is short these days, but I am excited for it to begin again in earnest once the weather heats up. I do know that other projects will get in the way, but I like that it’s something that runs in the background.

    Will keep people posted on here hopefully more frequently once things get rolling again.

    #712580

    Clev08
    Pro

    Nice to see you have made some progress, the short days always seem to make the winter less productive. Do you have feather boards or a power feeder for your table saw for when you rip the cedar down?

Viewing 20 posts - 61 through 80 (of 81 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

queries. 0.561 seconds