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Strip Built Kayak Build

This topic contains 72 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by  yellaD 4 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 73 total)
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  • #669291

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Hello all.

    As I mentioned in the “Workshop Goals 2018″ thread, my goal for this year (and maybe 2019 in all likelihood haha) is working on building my first strip built sea kayak. I thought I’d start a thread detailing my work on this build in case people are interested. It seemed like some people found my bandsaw blog on here interesting, and I plan on posting in the same style on here about this project. However, since I am not making a tool it may be inappropriate for this site to be posting this… please let me know and I will close down my postings on this forum related to the build. I will be using a lot of tool though I promise!!

    I also am interested in keeping an hours log, since many people ask me how long it takes to build projects. I’ll update here as I can with that too.

    So far I am about 9 hours into the build, counting around 4 hrs of lofting time.

    I’ve begun by lofting the forms from plans onto graph paper. I know it’s easier and faster to buy plans, but I am a cheapskate. I also wanted the experience of lofting.

    Then I copied the lofted half forms onto 11×17 paper twice, flipped one set over and traced the mirror half, then taped together the mirrored halves. Rough cut those out with scissors and used 3M Super 77 to attach them to 1/2” MDF.

    Jigsaw to cut out forms roughly, then cut closely on the bandsaw. Finally inch up to the line with my Ridgid OSS.

    Sorry for the long post. Next step next.

    #669294

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    I thought I’d also post a couple pictures of my setup for cutting and shaping forms. I am using an Elipse respirator (shown) and my Jet overhead air filtration system concurrently while cutting and sanding. I also run my shop vac with in-line Dust Deputy (shown) to gather dust as close to the source as possible. It attaches via the orange hose to a port in the back of the OSS. With all this running at once it’s loud, so I wear hearing protection as well (which plays music as well). I’m pleased to report that while all this is in action sanding, I don’t even smell the MDF until I take off my respirator, and even then it’s pretty subtle. I feel like my lungs are happy with all this.

    Next step will be cutting out the rectangular holes for the strongback.

    For those interested, the book I am working most out of is Nick Schade’s masterwork “The Strip Built Sea Kayak”, here:

    I am also learning extensively from his incredibly informative YouTube channel, here:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE4SrExIQ2h7tK_dUCXy4Fw

    He is a great writer, a great videographer, and an even greater boatbuilder. I highly encourage indulging in his materials.

    As always, questions, comments, criticisms, and suggestions are welcome.

    #669299

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    Congrats on beginning this project; I for one, will be following very closely.

    A couple of questions; are the forms tapered to aid in supporting the strips as they are laid down? Will you be stapling the strips to the forms or using tape to hold them as the glue sets? Will you be milling the cedar yourself?

    I have so many questions, maybe I should just watch and learn. lol

    https://www.instagram.com/woodiworkshop/

    #669307

    I will be watching this thread too. A strip canoe is on my bucket list. I just got Ted Moore’s Canoecraft book last week at the wood show.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #669311

    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    I’ll be following closely too. Be sure to take a lot of pictures. That will add a lot of time.
    I wish I had that space in my shop.

    #669312

    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    Should be interesting to follow your build. I am surprised you use mdf. Is this just to form to and then remove? I know mdf and water don’t get along well.

    #669314

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Thanks all for responding!!

    To respond to you all: @smallerstick The forms aren’t tapered. It’s 1/2 inch MDF, and while the strips will only technically contact the form along the outer edge (closest to the bow or stern depending on which form), it gives enough support according to Nick. Recently, Nick started a build where he used his relatively new CNC to cut the forms, and he did add a small bevel to the side of the forms. He says it only is really needed when you’re avoiding staples, which I am not. I plan to staple since it’s my first boat. Maybe if I decide to to more I’ll fuss with not stapling, but it’s faster and in my opinion doesn’t look too bad. Nick has stapled strips for years, so again I defer to the pro.
    I do plan to mill my own strips from cedar. That will have to wait until warmer weather as I’d need double the length of the boat to mill a full strip (17 ft in front and behind the table saw). I don’t have that long a garage in any direction, plus it will be more pleasant to do it at least partially outside I think.
    To answer another question that I am sure will be coming down the pike soon: I don’t plan to use bead and cove. Nick has a neat new tool called the “Robo Bevel”, which I bought from his site. He’s the only one making it. It uses a mini shoulder plane from Veritas. It looked like a great alternative to bead and cove.

    @jimdaddyo I have that book as well. Really enjoyed it. If you liked that one I’d definitely recommend the Schade text.

    @sorpa I barely have room. I work in a 2 car garage with about a thousand other things as well. The boat is a 17 foot long design with a 14 foot waterline. This means that to get around the boat I really need about 21 feet, which I just barely have lengthwise.

    @roninohio Thanks for following! MDF is only for the forms, which are not part of the final boat. MDF is used because of it’s easy workability and dimensional stability. Cedar is used traditionally for the kayak, but lots of other species would work too. Once the boat is done the wood should actually never touch the water. There are layers of fiberglass that surround the cedar on both the inside and outside of the boat.

    #669315

    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I just watched the video and understand better. I am not sure I would have the patience to build one. Lots and lots of sanding!
    I will say it is to pretty to use and I would cry if it got a scratch.
    Keep us posted on how it is coming along.

    #669333

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    To answer another question that I am sure will be coming down the pike soon: I don’t plan to use bead and cove. Nick has a neat new tool called the “Robo Bevel”, which I bought from his site. He’s the only one making it. It uses a mini shoulder plane from Veritas. It looked like a great alternative to bead and cove.

    Ha! You read my mind. I haven’t seen that tool yet. I know bead and cove is traditional but adds a lot of work to the job. I will be curious to see how well it works for you.

    EDIT Just watched Nick’s video. What a nice product! I agree with him; it looks like it will give a better job than cove and bead.

    https://www.instagram.com/woodiworkshop/

    #669338

    That is going to be a heck of project MrFid. More power to you and it will be great to see your pictures are you move along. Where do plan on floating the kayak when you are done?

    #669364

    I absolutely love this thread so far, you have a very informative posting style that resonates well with me. I’ll be following along enthusiastically. I’m guessing this type of kayak is built for calm water and speed based on it’s design?

    Life is 10% what happens to you, 90% Attitude.

    #669393

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Interesting build, looking forward to following it along.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #669406

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Thanks everyone for jumping in!

    The kayak is a sea kayak that is at home in choppy sea as well as a calm river, pond, or lake. I am fortunate enough to have access to a house on Misquamicut Beach in Westerly, RI during the summers, so I’ll hopefully be putting it through its paces there and in Winnapaug Pond when it’s done.

    My home is in Sudbury, MA very close to the Sudbury River as well as the Assabet River and (a little further away) the Charles River. I have a canoe that I use on those with my family now, and the kayak will do those no problem also.

    I will keep you all apprised of the updates. Thanks for reading.

    #669420

    RonW
    Pro
    Holladay, Tn

    This is going to be a fun build to follow. From the builds I have seen you have way more patients that I do.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #669453

    Clev08
    Pro

    Great build! My uncle built two wooden kayaks a few years ago and they are beautiful. It took him over a year to get them finished but said he’d do it again in a heartbeat. Really look forward to seeing your progress.

    #669595

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Thanks guys for jumping in.

    Yesterday I finished cutting out the holes for the strongback into the forms that the strongback will pass through. The bottom of each hole is the datum waterline (DWL), and the holes are 2″ by 4″, which will be the size of my strongback. I used my drill press and my 1 inch Forstner bit (Thanks BTP for the Forstner bit redemption!!) to drill holes at opposing corners. This allowed me to get my jigsaw started on opposite corners of the hole. I couldn’t use my bandsaw since the hole is internal, and I don’t have a scroll saw. I cut pretty much right to the line with my jigsaw. I’m okay with the holes being just barely oversized since it will allow me a little wiggle room when it comes time to align them. Any spots where I didn’t cut to the line I can always use a rasp to nibble away at later.
    The next step will be making the strongback. Nick says that you can use a standard 2×4 (in which case you’d cut the holes in the forms smaller), but I plan on making my own strongback out of a piece of 3/4 inch plywood. Nick recommends staggering the joints so that the strongback is stable and straight. I hope to do that at some point soon. It might have to wait for the weekend, or at least warmish weather one evening.

    Total time into this build so far I’ve calculated at 9.25 hours.

    #669601

    smallerstick
    Pro
    Listowel, ON

    Thanks guys for jumping in.

    Yesterday I finished cutting out the holes for the strongback into the forms that the strongback will pass through. The bottom of each hole is the datum waterline (DWL), and the holes are 2″ by 4″, which will be the size of my strongback. I used my drill press and my 1 inch Forstner bit (Thanks BTP for the Forstner bit redemption!!) to drill holes at opposing corners. This allowed me to get my jigsaw started on opposite corners of the hole. I couldn’t use my bandsaw since the hole is internal, and I don’t have a scroll saw. I cut pretty much right to the line with my jigsaw. I’m okay with the holes being just barely oversized since it will allow me a little wiggle room when it comes time to align them. Any spots where I didn’t cut to the line I can always use a rasp to nibble away at later.
    The next step will be making the strongback. Nick says that you can use a standard 2×4 (in which case you’d cut the holes in the forms smaller), but I plan on making my own strongback out of a piece of 3/4 inch plywood. Nick recommends staggering the joints so that the strongback is stable and straight. I hope to do that at some point soon. It might have to wait for the weekend, or at least warmish weather one evening.

    Total time into this build so far I’ve calculated at 9.25 hours.

    Excellent progress so far. Will the strongback be mounted on dedicated stands or on moveable ones like sawhorses?

    https://www.instagram.com/woodiworkshop/

    #669605

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    Excellent progress so far. Will the strongback be mounted on dedicated stands or on moveable ones like sawhorses?

    I plan to make some dedicated boat stands, but they’re basically sawhorses. I’d also like to make a small shelf for myself on them so that I can set tools, strips, clamps, etc down while I’m working.

    #670262

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    Congrats on starting on your goal of building a Kayak. I look for watching the progress of this project.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #670268

    cmeyer25
    Pro
    Bellingham, WA

    I watched a time lapse of someone building a strip built kayak – it looks like quite the process! I can’t wait to see more of it as you go.

    Charlie
    __________________

    Instagram

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