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stove top ventilation duct

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  • #592097
    Nyx
    Pro
    Pittsburgh, PA

    I have a question about the vent for my stove top which goes outside the house. Now that it’s getting colder outside, I’ve noticed that the cabinet is holding cold air. I dont necessarily want to say its drafty, but you can feel the difference in the air temp when you open the doors on top the hood where the vent is installed. Below is a picture of the inside of the cabinet. Looks like a basic vent run without any insulation. Is this proper? should there be insulation here? Should i really be concerned that this area is “leaking” heat and allowing cold air into my house through this one area? Does anyone go the extra step to reinforce this kind of vent in an effort to retain heat and resist cold air coming in. (as a side note: the type of vent on the outside wall on the exterior is a tri-fold flap type vent which blow open when the exhaust is in use.)

    #592098
    Nyx
    Pro
    Pittsburgh, PA

    Picture

    Attachments:
    #592104

    You will be better able to insulate it if its ridgid ducting – you can get a sleeve designed for it.

    Where it exhausts outside, is there a flap that closes? Otherwise, the cold air will just come in with no resistance

    #592105
    Nyx
    Pro
    Pittsburgh, PA

    Yes, outside there is a flap vent (plastic) that closes when not in use.

    #592110
    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    Easy way to tell would be to use some kind of thermal camera. I don’t think you should be losing much heat through the vent piping, I suspect it could also be an issue with the insulation in the back wall. Does the wall feel pretty cold?

    #592111
    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    First off, that’s not an approved venting material anywhere that I am aware of. It should be rigid duct. A lot of times, it’s an oval or square duct, depending on the hood vent.

    As far as cold air coming in, a little bit will, it just is what it is. You could insulate the duct, they sell thin insulation for wrapping ductwork with, but it’ll do nothing for the direct hole from your stovetop to the outside.

    Personally, I don’t see the big deal about outside air getting into a house. Without it, we die. But I’ll save this topic for an upcoming thread I’m working on.

    Delta

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #592116
    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    As far as cold air coming in, a little bit will, it just is what it is.

    A little bit is definitely acceptable but if it’s a notable difference in temperature then you could also be dealing with negative pressure issues. I’ve also only usually seen ridgid duct used but I guess codes are different everywhere you go.

    #592133

    I will say like Delta , I don’t think that would pass here either , first off , usually they have a rectangular offset duct inside the wall cavity where the stove should exhaust ,this way the draft does not have a direct path ,
    and should usually be in solid duct work, that being said , no matter you will always feel some difference in the temperature at that point ,
    it also depends on the placement of your stove to were it exhausts , some times it has a longer run across some cabinets to get to the outside , good luck with the work, keep us posted

    #592145
    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    Also just having the three little plastic flaps on the out side cover won’t stop the cold air. On top of it being rigid pipe a damper would be ideal like this one

    #593383
    Stilla
    Pro

    Just throwing my 2 cents in. i want to understand how long the duct run is. meaning how far is your range hood from the external exhaust. if it’s a long run, i can think of some serious problems that can develop from that, if you think the vent is allowing cold air into your home. lets start there.

    #593425
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    The duct should be rigid and insulated to the bottom of the roof deck. Flex duct is for the birds. Short runs from the rigid duct to the diffuser is OK, but anything more than that should not be used. I would replace the duct with rigid duct and insulate it. then seal the penetrations through the ceiling. you will get a lot better air flow for the fan and much less cold.

    #593572
    Nyx
    Pro
    Pittsburgh, PA

    i want to understand how long the duct run is.

    the run is only about 2- 2.5 ft total. it appears that a rigid duct elbow is used from the exterior wall and then connects to flex duct to the range hood.

    #593573
    Nyx
    Pro
    Pittsburgh, PA

    no matter you will always feel some difference in the temperature at that point ,

    since this is our first winter in our home (new construction) i am looking into each of these things that i find to make sure that its not a weak point in my home for heating\cooling efficiency. The builder already spec’d a smaller HVAC unit which targets zones of the house to heat\cool rather than the entire house at one – they call this “high efficiency”.

    #593574

    no matter you will always feel some difference in the temperature at that point ,

    since this is our first winter in our home (new construction) i am looking into each of these things that i find to make sure that its not a weak point in my home for heating\cooling efficiency. The builder already spec’d a smaller HVAC unit which targets zones of the house to heat\cool rather than the entire house at one – they call this “high efficiency”.

    Zoned is definitely the way to go

    You can get modern smart thermostats to go with it, and have different rules in place. My living areas are warm in the day and cool (not cold) at night. The bedrooms are the opposite. No sense heating where I’m not. Downstairs warms up about an hour before my alarm goes off

    I also have motion sensors hooked up to the system, so it will keep any “occupied” space at the comfort temperature, regardless of time of day. This means I won’t freeze in the bedroom if Im in it.

    Finally, there is an away setting. If nobody is home at all, the house can ride a couple of degrees cooler. Not much, since I want it to warm quickly, but it adds up

    If I know I will be away for long enough to bother, I can also flip it to vacation mode, which keeps the house just warm enough that the pipes won’t freeze (if thats how you set it) and I can either schedule the warm up, or just remotely warm it using my phone over the internet. Last winter, we went away for a week. Was worth not paying much heating

    #593585
    Nyx
    Pro
    Pittsburgh, PA

    I dont want to distract from the main topic, but i do want to have this conversation with you Eric so i started a new thread about Zoned HVAC here:

    http://bethepro.com/forums/topic/zoned-hvac/

    Back to the topic at hand…

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