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Storing power tools in garage or inside house

Viewing 17 posts - 21 through 37 (of 37 total)
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  • #607890

    I leave most of my tools in the truck. I haven’t had any issues.
    I do raise eyebrows about waxing planer and jointer tables. When you have wax on the bed and you joint a board that wax will get on the wood. I have seen a lot of glue failure when guys do that.

    Hmm I’ve never had it happen in all my years. Granted I almost never am making a glue connection straight from the jointer or planer. Faces get smoothed with a handplane before I glue up. However, during the working season, I use a stick of parrafin wax to give the soles of my handplanes a little more glide. This, along with paste wax and camellia oil, is a very common thing for woodworkers to put on tables.
    One thing to bear in mind is that when you apply paste wax, you apply the wax thick (relatively speaking), wait for it to haze over on the iron surface ( 5 mins does it usually), then wipe it off with a clean rag. Maybe if you omit that last step you could end up with joint trouble, but I’ve built an awful lot of furniture and never had a glueup fail because of residual paste wax on the surface. YMMV.

    I have yet to have a glueup fail because of residual paste wax as well. I also use parafin wax on the sole of my planes metal and wood and it seems to work fine, just incase of it happening maybe a quick sand with some sandpaper might eliminate any chance of failure.

    Ive had glue fail if I planed too smoothly (with hand planes) and basically closed all the grain but never did so with wax (although my planes always get crayoned with a bit of paraffin). A quick scuff with some sandpaper is all it takes to get a good glue up

    #607910
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    Some anecdotal evidence of how rust/corrosion works.

    I worked in a few auto body shops years ago. In one of them we had a pick up truck owned by a fire department come in. The truck was only 4 years old and looked new, as fire department vehicles are washed and maintained a lot. The problem….the floors were almost completely rusted out…..Why?…..well, despite being cleaned a lot, they don’t clean underneath, and they park in a heated garage. Moisture, oxygen, and heat are the 3 things that cause rust the most. Probably the worst thing you can do is to regularly take metals from warm to cold back and forth. When the cold metal comes in to the warm, the humidity in the warm air condenses onto the cold metal (think of a beer taken out of the fridge and set on the table) and starts the process of oxidation.

    Iron, in it’s natural state, is Iron Oxide. That is what they mine, and refine it into iron, add a few other minerals and you get steels. Iron always wants to return to its natural state (rust).

    Ever wonder why the Titanic is in such good shape after being immersed in salt water for so long?….It is so deep that there is a lack of oxygen and temperature and even though salt is an oxidiser the chemical reaction of turning iron to iron oxide is slowed by the lack of 2 of the required elements (oxygen and heat).

    If your tools are well below the freezing point of water, and stay that way, they won’t oxidise very well at all.

    I can remember that from over 30 years ago, but I can’t remember an anniversary date….go figure.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #607917
    hojo04
    Pro
    Burton, Michigan

    LOL Jimdaddyo. Things we remember and can’t remember. There are some great points on this post. I’m glad I asked. I have to build something for all my power and cordless tools.

    #607929

    @JimDaddyO great information right there Jim, and funny as well lol

    As for myself, they used for stay in my closed trailer, and also in my garage, the garage was insulated, but not heated, never had any problems.
    As for cordless, the main culprit is over heating the batteries.

    #608001
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I store tools inside, outside and in my van.

    #608020

    In my shop. A coat of paste wax on all cast iron surfaces keeps rust at bay. I save the little pellets from shoes and things and throw that in my tool boxes and occasionally heat it up in a microwave to take any moisture out. Seems to work well, although I am not in a very humid place relatively speaking.

    Orange County, CA

    #608052
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    All of my tools in the garage. Only have a problem in winter if it is warmer out than inside the garage, which happens a lot here in NC. On those days if I open the shop door it almost starts raining. I have learned no sun out don’t go out to the shop, then no problem with moisture.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #608075
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    All of my tools in the garage. Only have a problem in winter if it is warmer out than inside the garage, which happens a lot here in NC. On those days if I open the shop door it almost starts raining. I have learned no sun out don’t go out to the shop, then no problem with moisture.

    I have found this to be true in my shop as well. During the winter if the temp is up and the humidity and dew points are high I better stay out of the shop.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #608078
    keko
    Pro

    we leave our tools in the trailer year round no worries.

    #608102
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I try to keep as many motorized tools out of unheated places during the winter as possible. It’s not imminently catastrophic if I don’t, but you know a motors lifespan is affected otherwise, and if you don’t have to leave outdoors for extended periods, why not keep them inside.

    #608525
    hojo04
    Pro
    Burton, Michigan

    I’m going to keep everything in the house down in the basement.

    #608625
    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    Shoot, wish I had a nice, heated shop to work in, and store my tools in.

    Fact is, my “shop” is an unheated, detached outbuilding on the ranch, and most of my tools are either in the truck boxes, or on a jobsite. Some jobsites are heated, some aren’t. A lot of my tools have never been stored anywhere but the truck boxes.

    Then I work in the rain all the time, and try as I might to keep stuff dry, it still ends up wet. Wipe it down with a rag, throw it in the toolbox, and do it again the next day.

    That’s kinda the reality of construction work.

    Shop work is different of course. I wouldn’t know anything about that, though.

    Delta

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #608650
    utopia78
    Pro
    Toronto, ON

    im a fan of the silica packets as well.. i dont buy them mind you any time i buy new shoes i take the packet out and even in the brand of air spikes and nails i buy they have large silica packets i toss em in my tool boxes to help keep moisture down

    That’s a great idea! I get little silica packs in my seaweed snacks, maybe some of them can have a new use.

    A Working Pro since 2004

    #608811
    hojo04
    Pro
    Burton, Michigan

    If I get any good size ones I will save them for this reason. Great idea. I like to reuse things for a different purpose when I can.

    #608889
    Doobie
    Moderator

    im a fan of the silica packets as well.. i dont buy them mind you any time i buy new shoes i take the packet out and even in the brand of air spikes and nails i buy they have large silica packets i toss em in my tool boxes to help keep moisture down

    That’s a great idea! I get little silica packs in my seaweed snacks, maybe some of them can have a new use.

    They’re also good to throw in my canisters that hold my biscuits. Keeps them from swelling up.

    #609012
    brianpeters
    Pro
    Murray, KY

    My tools are seldom in a heated area, usually either in my truck, or in my dad’s shop which isn’t heated. I have noticed batteries will run down quickly when it’s real cold, have never worried too much about it though.

    #609331
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Some anecdotal evidence of how rust/corrosion works.

    I worked in a few auto body shops years ago. In one of them we had a pick up truck owned by a fire department come in. The truck was only 4 years old and looked new, as fire department vehicles are washed and maintained a lot. The problem….the floors were almost completely rusted out…..Why?…..well, despite being cleaned a lot, they don’t clean underneath, and they park in a heated garage. Moisture, oxygen, and heat are the 3 things that cause rust the most. Probably the worst thing you can do is to regularly take metals from warm to cold back and forth. When the cold metal comes in to the warm, the humidity in the warm air condenses onto the cold metal (think of a beer taken out of the fridge and set on the table) and starts the process of oxidation.

    Iron, in it’s natural state, is Iron Oxide. That is what they mine, and refine it into iron, add a few other minerals and you get steels. Iron always wants to return to its natural state (rust).

    Ever wonder why the Titanic is in such good shape after being immersed in salt water for so long?….It is so deep that there is a lack of oxygen and temperature and even though salt is an oxidiser the chemical reaction of turning iron to iron oxide is slowed by the lack of 2 of the required elements (oxygen and heat).

    If your tools are well below the freezing point of water, and stay that way, they won’t oxidise very well at all.

    I can remember that from over 30 years ago, but I can’t remember an anniversary date….go figure.

    Thanks for sharing. Great info. Made me think of a time I went over to a friends house. He was showing me and another friend that his new truck was in his parents garage all week with heat on in the winter. I think his dad put a stop to that after got the hydro bill.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

Viewing 17 posts - 21 through 37 (of 37 total)
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