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Storing power tools in garage or inside house

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  • #607669
    hojo04
    Pro
    Burton, Michigan

    I have a question that people I have talked to I get mixed answers. Is it ok to store power tools & cordless power tools in your garage? Just a regular that not heated. So it would colder in the winter months and warmer in the summer months. I have need told for the cordless tools I should store the batteries inside the house. I’m curious what your thoughts are?

    #607672
    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    My shop is in my unheated, uninsulated garage. The tools stay out there all winter long. I don’t use them nearly as much as in the more temperate seasons, but they do fine. Cold shouldn’t bother them too much. Things I do:
    1. As the days get chillier, I give every bare cast iron surface (jointer beds, planer bed, drill press table, handplane soles, etc) a healthy coating of paste wax. This combats the formation of rust as much as possible. It’s also a good practice in general as well.
    2. Battery operated tools either get their batteries removed and brought in, or the tool comes in (if it’s handheld). I know that some people say batteries are okay to leave out, but for me better safe than sorry. It’s no big deal if they’re left out for a day or two, but I wouldn’t use it cold. Again, better safe than sorry. There are certainly people on here who know a lot more about that than I do, so you should hear what they have to say about batteries in cold.
    3. In my tool cabinet, where a lot of my hand tools are, I throw in some silica packets to keep humidity down and consistent. They can be found cheaply on Amazon or in some products. I throw extra ones I find in the cabinet as well.

    #607674
    Clev08
    Pro

    Some cordless tools don’t work/or work as well when they are below freezing but when they warm up are fine. I would say the biggest concern would be constantly bringing tools in a warm environment from a cold one. This causes water to condense on the cold tool and can cause some rust on internal parts. my boss had to throw away 3 brand new dewalt reciprocating saws because they had rusted on the inside. I usually keep most of my tools in my car, but I keep the case sealed until they warm up a little bit so water doesn’t get into them.

    #607677
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    im a fan of the silica packets as well.. i dont buy them mind you any time i buy new shoes i take the packet out and even in the brand of air spikes and nails i buy they have large silica packets i toss em in my tool boxes to help keep moisture down

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #607679

    Another thought about cold. As these cordless tools become brushless with the electronic controls, the chips may not like being fired up in the cold. I can remember turning on a computer that had just arrived from UPS in the winter and I fried the power supply. Batteries don’t like extreme cold and rust is going to be an ever present threat from being outside with humidity and temperature changes.

    #607680
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    1. As the days get chillier, I give every bare cast iron surface (jointer beds, planer bed, drill press table, handplane soles, etc) a healthy coating of paste wax. This combats the formation of rust as much as possible. It’s also a good practice in general as well.

    Great info right there. ^^

    I place those child sidewalk chalk sticks throughout my tool chest, it also helps with the absorption of moisture.

    For the more humid summer months, I place moisture absorbing containers in different areas, you would be amazed at the amount of water in the air.
    I buy mine at my local dollar store.

    Battery operated hand tools typically stay in my basement work room.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #607683
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    Corrosion is my biggest concern. My shop is in an unheated garage as well. It is heated when I am in it but that is a lot less in the winter, for sure. A good coat of wax is the best protection.

    I don’t have a lot of cordless tools but they live in the house during the winter. I just don’t like using them cold.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #607694
    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    Luckily I don’t have to deal with humidity much, I just try to keep my batteries warm .

    #607703
    hojo04
    Pro
    Burton, Michigan

    From the responses it looks like I’m better off keeping them in the basement and build something for them rather than keeping them in the garage. Especially the cordless tools.

    #607705
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    From the responses it looks like I’m better off keeping them in the basement and build something for them rather than keeping them in the garage. Especially the cordless tools.

    I have to agree with keeping them in the basement or a heated insulated area. However on that note i do keep mine in the garage but i oil the crap out of things or i end up having to do alot of sanding in the spring.

    #607729
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    All my tools stay in the unheated shop. They do fine out there. Corrosion is only an issue when the humidity in the air condenses on them. Below freezing does not seem to have much effect, it’s when it gets just above the freezing mark. Spring is the worst time of year for it. It is also the time I take a day or two and go over everything and clean them and add a coat of wax. So far so good.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #607749
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    My shop is heated….so either in my case. If I take tools home though, they go straight inside in this weather.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
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    #607751
    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    All of my tools, cordless or not live in a 6×12 cargo trailer, or the box of my truck.

    I can’t tell you with all certainty that it’s the best thing in the world, but I’ve never had any problems.

    Just about everyone I know around here in the trades leaves everything either in a truck/van or trailer all year long, with little to no heat.

    The only effect I’ve seen it have is on NiCad batteries, that are almost obsolete now anyways.

    #607762
    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    I leave most of my tools in the truck. I haven’t had any issues.
    I do raise eyebrows about waxing planer and jointer tables. When you have wax on the bed and you joint a board that wax will get on the wood. I have seen a lot of glue failure when guys do that.

    #607767
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I leave most of my tools in the truck. I haven’t had any issues.
    I do raise eyebrows about waxing planer and jointer tables. When you have wax on the bed and you joint a board that wax will get on the wood. I have seen a lot of glue failure when guys do that.

    That’s why I use TopCoat. Stays on longer than wax and leaves no residue.

    #607775
    Masterbosch
    Pro
    Wayne, NJ

    I rarely leave tools in the truck my tools are either inside the basement or at the house I am working at. I wouldn’t leave tools in van or trailer Cuz just like u see condensation on your car sometimes same happens inside of ur tool and to all metal parts. That’s how stuff gets oxidation. I try to keep my tools inside.

    plusoneconstructionllc@gmail.com

    #607780
    Warren6810
    Moderator
    Akron, OH

    im a fan of the silica packets as well.. i dont buy them mind you any time i buy new shoes i take the packet out and even in the brand of air spikes and nails i buy they have large silica packets i toss em in my tool boxes to help keep moisture down

    Never really thought of doing that, but it makes good sense. Usually when my tools start getting rusty it is a good excuse to buy new ones.

    #607784
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    1. As the days get chillier, I give every bare cast iron surface (jointer beds, planer bed, drill press table, handplane soles, etc) a healthy coating of paste wax. This combats the formation of rust as much as possible. It’s also a good practice in general as well.

    Great info right there. ^^

    I place those child sidewalk chalk sticks throughout my tool chest, it also helps with the absorption of moisture.

    For the more humid summer months, I place moisture absorbing containers in different areas, you would be amazed at the amount of water in the air.
    I buy mine at my local dollar store.

    Battery operated hand tools typically stay in my basement work room.

    I like these tips also. As my shop is in my basement of older house. It is heated but there much heat on there unless I in the shop. I also put paste wax on my cast iron surfaces.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #607805
    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    I leave most of my tools in the truck. I haven’t had any issues.
    I do raise eyebrows about waxing planer and jointer tables. When you have wax on the bed and you joint a board that wax will get on the wood. I have seen a lot of glue failure when guys do that.

    Hmm I’ve never had it happen in all my years. Granted I almost never am making a glue connection straight from the jointer or planer. Faces get smoothed with a handplane before I glue up. However, during the working season, I use a stick of parrafin wax to give the soles of my handplanes a little more glide. This, along with paste wax and camellia oil, is a very common thing for woodworkers to put on tables.
    One thing to bear in mind is that when you apply paste wax, you apply the wax thick (relatively speaking), wait for it to haze over on the iron surface ( 5 mins does it usually), then wipe it off with a clean rag. Maybe if you omit that last step you could end up with joint trouble, but I’ve built an awful lot of furniture and never had a glueup fail because of residual paste wax on the surface. YMMV.

    #607871
    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    I leave most of my tools in the truck. I haven’t had any issues.
    I do raise eyebrows about waxing planer and jointer tables. When you have wax on the bed and you joint a board that wax will get on the wood. I have seen a lot of glue failure when guys do that.

    Hmm I’ve never had it happen in all my years. Granted I almost never am making a glue connection straight from the jointer or planer. Faces get smoothed with a handplane before I glue up. However, during the working season, I use a stick of parrafin wax to give the soles of my handplanes a little more glide. This, along with paste wax and camellia oil, is a very common thing for woodworkers to put on tables.
    One thing to bear in mind is that when you apply paste wax, you apply the wax thick (relatively speaking), wait for it to haze over on the iron surface ( 5 mins does it usually), then wipe it off with a clean rag. Maybe if you omit that last step you could end up with joint trouble, but I’ve built an awful lot of furniture and never had a glueup fail because of residual paste wax on the surface. YMMV.

    I have yet to have a glueup fail because of residual paste wax as well. I also use parafin wax on the sole of my planes metal and wood and it seems to work fine, just incase of it happening maybe a quick sand with some sandpaper might eliminate any chance of failure.

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