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Spiral Router Bits

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  • #81265
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    I am looking to design my router bit collection and I am going to incorporate spiral bits. From the research I have done I am thinking about using up-cut bits on my router table. Do you guys use Spiral router bits?

    http://www.boschtools.com/Products/Accessories/Pages/BoschProductListCategory.aspx?catId=1103&subCatId=1209

    #81336
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    Jason, I use spiral bits all the time mainly for making plunge cuts since I find they work better than regular straight bits. Typically I’ll use them for making mortises, cutting circles, grooves etc. I have 1/4″, 3/8″ and 1/2″ solid carbide.

    Dan

    danpattison.com

    #81342
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I think for a router table you would want a down cut , as your router is upside down. A down cut would push the wood fibers into the board resulting in less tear out. An upcut would be pulling the fibers out of the board and potentially result in tear out. The upcut would clear chips better but I think the downcut would result in a better cut

    #81343
    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    I use spiral bits for hinge mortising and most plunge cuts, I also use them for rabbits and dados.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #81376

    I think for a router table you would want a down cut , as your router is upside down. A down cut would push the wood fibers into the board resulting in less tear out. An upcut would be pulling the fibers out of the board and potentially result in tear out. The upcut would clear chips better but I think the downcut would result in a better cut

    I would suggest seeing how the bit works on a scrap first to determine whether to use one or the other. Wood species vary in how they react to machining. In general though, I agree defaulting to a downcut bit is better as Kurt suggests. Kurt, do you make a couple of passes through the stock or take it all at once?

    #81382
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Lon, it all depends on the size of the bit and the depth of cut and hardness of the material. Up to about a quarter inch deep , a single pass will give decent results up to about a half inch bit. If it is hard oak, maple or another dense wood, I may make 2 passes. With a small bit such as a quarter inch it is important to make multiple passes when routing over 1/4″ deep as it puts to much stress on the bit otherwise.

    #81384

    Agreed, Kurt. I think a mistake folks can make is trying to hog out too much material at once.

    #81430

    I love spiral bits and use them all the time. Great for mortising and dado work. Also drilling holes. Cleaner cut than straight bits in my opinion. I have several sizes in metric and imperial. 3/8, 1/4 and 1/2 inch will do many tasks you would need to do well and cover most sizes.

    Orange County, CA

    #81632
    svensshutters
    Pro
    Colorado Springs, CO

    I’m getting some bits, so I’ll throw some of these spiral bits in and see how they do.

    #81634
    Rob
    Pro
    Birmingham, Alabama

    What brand bits are you guys using?

    #81676

    I have been a fan of Freud and Whiteside.

    #81899
    ChadM
    Moderator
    East Palestine, Ohio

    Most of my bits are either Freud or Rockler.

    Chad

    A Working Pro since 1993

    Member since 12/07/2013

    #81904
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    most of mine are Bosch, Freud or Rockler. the Cosch and Freyd are definately superior to the Rockler. I have a few other misc bits mixed in also.

    #81914

    Spiral bits also take a bit of getting use to. They can kick back on you a lot easier than a regular straight bit. You can also consider compression bits which are up and down cut combined into one bit.

    #81991
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    I think for a router table you would want a down cut , as your router is upside down. A down cut would push the wood fibers into the board resulting in less tear out. An upcut would be pulling the fibers out of the board and potentially result in tear out. The upcut would clear chips better but I think the downcut would result in a better cut

    I will pick up down and up spiral double flutes off of the BTP list and give them a shot. I used a 1/4″ straight bit today and really wish I would have picked up the slightly undersized plywood bit because now I need to use glue. Ahh the lessons I am learning.

    #82242
    Rob
    Pro
    Birmingham, Alabama

    I have done some carving on signs and will freehand the letters but the last time I used a strait carbide flat bit to ‘hog’ out the waste wood. It seems that the spiral might not have as much kickback. Would that be true?

    #82547
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Jason, the undersized plywood bits are a great benefit. While they have their place in the collection, standard size are useful also. The “plywood sized” bits are typically a little more expensive so I try not to use them for just hogging out material. I would prefer a standard bit for that to give it the abuse, and minimize the need to have the plywood bit sharpened.

    #83238
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    After spending a ton of time looking I was able to find Bosch’s plywood bits:

    http://www.boschtools.com/Products/Accessories/Pages/BoschAccessoryDetail.aspx?pid=84625M#specs

    And they are all covered by BTP points!

    #93934
    MKE_Voltage
    Moderator
    Saint Francis, WI

    ‘I have been using the up spiral bit that I received from BTP and it is pretty solid. I am finding that there is a a bit of tear out at the bottom of the piece but the top or finish side is very clean.

    #93960
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Moderator
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Jason, you may want to try the double shear (compression) bits that are set up for a down cut from the top and an up cut from the bottom to minimize tearout on both sides of material.

    Here is a link to a Bosch Compression spiral bit.

    http://www.boschtools.com/Products/Accessories/Pages/BoschAccessoryDetail.aspx?pid=86026M#specs

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