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Spiral compression bits

This topic contains 12 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  wbembrid 3 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #521033

    Jpg-woodworking
    Pro
    Tallahassee, FL

    I picked up a Freud 1/4″ spiral compression bit today for a job I have coming up. I’m building a bunch of mailbox compartments out of 1/2″ birch plywood, it will have 1/4″ dowels going through and sticking out both sides to hold the shelves.

    It seemed like a compression but was the way to go to preserve the veneer on both sides, but I’ve heard there are some tricks to using them properly. Anyone have experience with them? Can I stack multiple sheets together and route them simultaneously? Thanks for any input.

    #521232

    What exactly are you going to do here? Make holes? I am not following what you plan to do.

    #521284

    Anonymous

    I’m going to show my ignorance here but I don’t even know what a compression bit is?

    #521285

    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I picked up a Freud 1/4″ spiral compression bit today for a job I have coming up. I’m building a bunch of mailbox compartments out of 1/2″ birch plywood, it will have 1/4″ dowels going through and sticking out both sides to hold the shelves.

    It seemed like a compression but was the way to go to preserve the veneer on both sides, but I’ve heard there are some tricks to using them properly. Anyone have experience with them? Can I stack multiple sheets together and route them simultaneously? Thanks for any input.

    What cutting length do you have on the bit? Top bearing, bottom bearing or both?

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #521292

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I’m going to show my ignorance here but I don’t even know what a compression bit is?

    It’s a spiral router bit that is a combination of up-cut and down-cut. They are supposed to prevent tear out on both sides of the material.

    As for tips…if you’ve graduated to using spiral bits, I’d say that you probably already know how to use a router. Use a sacrificial piece of wood on each side and you will most certainly be okay.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #521296

    Doobie
    Pro

    I’m going to show my ignorance here but I don’t even know what a compression bit is?

    Neither did I.

    It’s a spiral router bit that is a combination of up-cut and down-cut. They are supposed to prevent tear out on both sides of the material.

    Thanks Jon!

    #521341

    Clev08
    Pro

    I’m going to show my ignorance here but I don’t even know what a compression bit is?

    Neither did I.

    It’s a spiral router bit that is a combination of up-cut and down-cut. They are supposed to prevent tear out on both sides of the material.

    Thanks Jon!

    Now that @jponto07 explained what it is I have heard of them before, I think on a wood whispered video. I think the biggest thing to reduce year out like Jon said is to use a sacrificial piece on the ends.

    #521343

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    I’m going to show my ignorance here but I don’t even know what a compression bit is?

    I was in the same boat Boyd, that’s what is great about this forum, I just learned something else, many great tips and advice, plus now I know what a compression bit is,

    @jponto07 thank you Jon, did not know that 🙂

    #521358

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I’m going to show my ignorance here but I don’t even know what a compression bit is?

    I was in the same boat Boyd, that’s what is great about this forum, I just learned something else, many great tips and advice, plus now I know what a compression bit is,

    @jponto07 thank you Jon, did not know that 🙂

    No problem! Agreed BTP is a wealth of knowledge.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #521604

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    It’s a spiral router bit that is a combination of up-cut and down-cut. They are supposed to prevent tear out on both sides of the material.

    Nice explanation Jon, Thank you

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #521752

    Jpg-woodworking
    Pro
    Tallahassee, FL

    Honestly, I’m pretty new to routers. I’ve used an older Craftsman fixed base my father in law gave me for round overs and basic template cutting, but my Bosch MR23 plunge router just showed up this week.

    I found out about the compression bits when I was researching up vs down cutting spiral bits, but compression looks like the way to go for veneered material where both sides will be visible. The 1/4″ bit was $54 though, so it comes at a price.

    It also only has a 7/8″ cutting depth, so I won’t be able to stack and cut multiple 1/2″ panels at once.

    This project will use 6 vertical panels that will have holes bored completely through them, with short dowels inserted to act as shelf pins on both sides. That is what they used on the other section I’m matching, though after giving it some thought I could just do dados or use regular shelf pins and a small amount of tear out wouldn’t be an issue.

    #521755

    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    I’m going to show my ignorance here but I don’t even know what a compression bit is?

    It’s a spiral router bit that is a combination of up-cut and down-cut. They are supposed to prevent tear out on both sides of the material.

    As for tips…if you’ve graduated to using spiral bits, I’d say that you probably already know how to use a router. Use a sacrificial piece of wood on each side and you will most certainly be okay.

    I have never heard of them before either so that is good to know .

    #521756

    I’m going to show my ignorance here but I don’t even know what a compression bit is?

    It’s a spiral router bit that is a combination of up-cut and down-cut. They are supposed to prevent tear out on both sides of the material.

    As for tips…if you’ve graduated to using spiral bits, I’d say that you probably already know how to use a router. Use a sacrificial piece of wood on each side and you will most certainly be okay.

    Thanks, I didn’t know they were called that.

    Will

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