dcsimg

Source(s) for buying a Lamp Post or build my own? Install Included.

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  • #733410
    Doobie
    Moderator

    One way that some Canadians can get around a lot of this with buying stuff from the US is if they live close to the US border, there are places set up near border crossings on the US side that will accept a shipment for a Canadian who sets up an account with them to do just that, and all you do is go over the border and pick it up for a reasonable fee from such places.

    I would think canada would shut this down, everyone needs to pay for all that free stuff you get.

    You lost me. What free stuff?

    #733424
    Doobie
    Moderator

    So today I started on taking out the old lamp post and what was meant as a temp base for it enough so that I could get to the buried conduit for it and figure out how I’m gonna move the conduit line over to the new hole that I already augered last year a foot away or so from where the existing lamp post was located.

    The old post and conduit to it was set up so that I could one day move it. Basically, for the old lamp post base, I had dug a four foot deep hole, slapped two 6x6s approx a little longer than 3 feet together with lag bolts, and fastened two more one foot lengths of 6×6 perpendicular on top near the grade which were also lagged together and both lagged them to the sunk 3′ 6x6s to form a T. On top of that, I placed two 3/4 PT ‘plates’ to which I drilled holes to fasten the old lamp post base using 6in lags. The conduit buried about 18 inches ran up thru one side thru the top of the T. The idea was the post was deep enough for frost heave, and one day I could retrieve the conduit by breaking apart the top of the T, which I did today. The buried 3 foot long sunk PTs xpuld sit there and rot.

    One may ask, ‘Why didn’t you just pour a comcrete base the first time around?’. Answer, we used to have only a one car driveway and I knew one day I would want to widen to a two car wide driveway. Not knowing if we would need to relocate the lamp post to widen the driveway, I decided to just do that temp setup using that T buried 6×6 arrangement. The driveway got widened a few years ago and the post where it was wasn’t a problem as I was allowed to encroach for most of the driveway widening on the far side to the limit allowed near my property line, but I didn’t know years ago where I may be forced to go in wanting to widen my driveway.

    One of the things I maybe should have done different when I did this 17 years ago was run the wire in a bigger conduit than a half inch conduit because there is no way you could pull the wire out and re-feed it afterwards in a half inch ID conduit with all the bends to the house the way I ran my trench for the conduit.

    But this actually worked out nicely using a smaller conduit as I was able to use one of those spin around pipe cutters once I cleared a five inch clearance all around the conduit to be able to spin it around and cut the existing conduit and slide it off without any risk of slicing the wire sheathing inside it. This idea just popped in my head today working on this to see if a pipe cutter would work.

    Up until I came up with the idea of using a pipe cutter, I really wasn’t sure how I was gonna tackle that part of it. You can’t use a torch to heat the conduit per my electrician buddy to bend it over as it is sure to melt the wire sheathing inside. A hack saw or using my OMT were also not the safest idea either. With buried wiring, that sheathing really needs to stay intact.

    Now I’m off to HD to buy some PVC conduit bends and conduit to run the rest of the conduit to the new hole for the lamp post.

    #733445
    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    This is actually what I had in mind, except I would have made it 7-8 feet tall instead.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe title=”Making a Wooden Lighthouse (Part 2 of 2)” width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/1R4uaILeaLQ?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture” allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>
    But wifey nixed that idea.

    Now you’re talkin!!! Maybe incorporate a bird house into it and bang,,,

    LOL….. don’t forget some plastic pink flamingos scattered around the lawn to tie it all together

    #733457
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    This is actually what I had in mind, except I would have made it 7-8 feet tall instead.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe title=”Making a Wooden Lighthouse (Part 2 of 2)” width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/1R4uaILeaLQ?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture” allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>
    But wifey nixed that idea.

    Now you’re talkin!!! Maybe incorporate a bird house into it and bang,,,

    LOL….. don’t forget some plastic pink flamingos scattered around the lawn to tie it all together

    or maybe penguins. Penguins are “in” this year, I’m told.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #733458
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    This is actually what I had in mind, except I would have made it 7-8 feet tall instead.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe title=”Making a Wooden Lighthouse (Part 2 of 2)” width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/1R4uaILeaLQ?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture” allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>
    But wifey nixed that idea.

    Now you’re talkin!!! Maybe incorporate a bird house into it and bang,,,

    LOL….. don’t forget some plastic pink flamingos scattered around the lawn to tie it all together

    or maybe penguins. Penguins are “in” this year, I’m told.

    Penguins, yes definitely penguins. LMAO

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #733459
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Is that regular NM-B cable inside the 1/2″ PVC conduit? In the US this is prohibited if the conduit is buried or exposed outdoor because the inside of the raceway is considered a wet location. Canada electric code allows that?

    #733460
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Is that regular NM-B cable inside the 1/2″ PVC conduit? In the US this is prohibited if the conduit is buried or exposed outdoor because the inside of the raceway is considered a wet location. Canada electric code allows that?

    It’s the grey underground stuff. Pretty sure it is rated for burial use.

    #733462

    This is actually what I had in mind, except I would have made it 7-8 feet tall instead.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe title=”Making a Wooden Lighthouse (Part 2 of 2)” width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/1R4uaILeaLQ?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture” allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>
    But wifey nixed that idea.

    Now you’re talkin!!! Maybe incorporate a bird house into it and bang,,,

    LOL….. don’t forget some plastic pink flamingos scattered around the lawn to tie it all together

    or maybe penguins. Penguins are “in” this year, I’m told.

    Haha yeah , funny thing, yesterday when I picked up my daughter from school , I saw a lawn full of those little plastic cows I couldn’t believe it , I’ll try to get a picture. Guess it was a birthday party ?

    #733471
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Gonna get back on this this afternoon, need to excavate about 6 inches or so of crunbled dirt that worked itself off the inner hole walls since last year when I dug it. Frankly, I’m surprised it was that little.

    I bought a 12 inch sonotube for it last nite, now I’m just debating how much should I leave of it above ground or just have it almost flush to the surrounding grade.

    #733481
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Gonna get back on this this afternoon, need to excavate about 6 inches or so of crunbled dirt that worked itself off the inner hole walls since last year when I dug it. Frankly, I’m surprised it was that little.

    Got the dirt sucked out of the bottom of the pier hole for my lamp post using my old ShopVac. Glad I kept that old ShopVac just for such jobs. Worked dandy for this task as I don’t think it would have been good for me to use my clam shells digger due to my shoulder injury. Would have been too much raising my arm above my head repeatedly. I still can’t do a lot of stuff like that.

    I bought a 12 inch sonotube for it last nite, now I’m just debating how much should I leave of it above ground or just have it almost flush to the surrounding grade.

    I left it proud of the surrounding grade. Think I’ll set the concrete maybe an inch shy of the rim and use it as such to pool water on top of it for curing purposes til it starts to disolve. Recall from another thread, my bags of crete are over a year old, so curing becomes a concern and the longer than usual, the better. My pad pour from a week and a half ago is still being kept wet.

    I ran the conduit line into the Sonotube and it is now all set for the pour and there’s a couple of inches of crushed now already in the bottom. I filled in the surrounding area I dug up from the old pole to divert the conduit, and maybe tomorrow I’ll do the pour but the weather is iffy for tomorrow.

    Still, I’m very happy thus far how much more quickly this job has gone so far once I started at it yesterday and how well it has gone. The whole issue with diverting the conduit feed line was my biggest head scratcher, but as I showed yesterday, I got that worked out nicely using a spin pipe cutter.

    I find it amazing sometimes how I ponder about head scratcher tasks to undertake forever prior, and suddenly when I’m at the task at hand, a solution just suddenly pops in my head that is ideal. This is one of the things I love about renos. The problem solving and the fly by the seat of your pants solutions that come up. Keeps me going!

    Some pics for your wining and dining pleasure….

    #733501
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Gonna get back on this this afternoon, need to excavate about 6 inches or so of crunbled dirt that worked itself off the inner hole walls since last year when I dug it. Frankly, I’m surprised it was that little.

    Got the dirt sucked out of the bottom of the pier hole for my lamp post using my old ShopVac. Glad I kept that old ShopVac just for such jobs. Worked dandy for this task as I don’t think it would have been good for me to use my clam shells digger due to my shoulder injury. Would have been too much raising my arm above my head repeatedly. I still can’t do a lot of stuff like that.

    I bought a 12 inch sonotube for it last nite, now I’m just debating how much should I leave of it above ground or just have it almost flush to the surrounding grade.

    I left it proud of the surrounding grade. Think I’ll set the concrete maybe an inch shy of the rim and use it as such to pool water on top of it for curing purposes til it starts to disolve. Recall from another thread, my bags of crete are over a year old, so curing becomes a concern and the longer than usual, the better. My pad pour from a week and a half ago is still being kept wet.

    I ran the conduit line into the Sonotube and it is now all set for the pour and there’s a couple of inches of crushed now already in the bottom. I filled in the surrounding area I dug up from the old pole to divert the conduit, and maybe tomorrow I’ll do the pour but the weather is iffy for tomorrow.

    Still, I’m very happy thus far how much more quickly this job has gone so far once I started at it yesterday and how well it has gone. The whole issue with diverting the conduit feed line was my biggest head scratcher, but as I showed yesterday, I got that worked out nicely using a spin pipe cutter.

    I find it amazing sometimes how I ponder about head scratcher tasks to undertake forever prior, and suddenly when I’m at the task at hand, a solution just suddenly pops in my head that is ideal. This is one of the things I love about renos. The problem solving and the fly by the seat of your pants solutions that come up. Keeps me going!

    Some pics for your wining and dining pleasure….

    Looks like a productive day. I am sure you will be happy when you get the concrete poured.

    I used a pipe cutter to shorten my conduit when I installed my LED outside light few weeks ago. It worked really good. I had a head scratcher moment too. Thinking what I was going use to cut the conduit. Then I thought of my pipe cutter wouldn’t be big enough for the job. It was just big enough for the job.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #733522
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Gonna get back on this this afternoon, need to excavate about 6 inches or so of crunbled dirt that worked itself off the inner hole walls since last year when I dug it. Frankly, I’m surprised it was that little.

    Got the dirt sucked out of the bottom of the pier hole for my lamp post using my old ShopVac. Glad I kept that old ShopVac just for such jobs. Worked dandy for this task as I don’t think it would have been good for me to use my clam shells digger due to my shoulder injury. Would have been too much raising my arm above my head repeatedly. I still can’t do a lot of stuff like that.

    I bought a 12 inch sonotube for it last nite, now I’m just debating how much should I leave of it above ground or just have it almost flush to the surrounding grade.

    I left it proud of the surrounding grade. Think I’ll set the concrete maybe an inch shy of the rim and use it as such to pool water on top of it for curing purposes til it starts to disolve. Recall from another thread, my bags of crete are over a year old, so curing becomes a concern and the longer than usual, the better. My pad pour from a week and a half ago is still being kept wet.

    I ran the conduit line into the Sonotube and it is now all set for the pour and there’s a couple of inches of crushed now already in the bottom. I filled in the surrounding area I dug up from the old pole to divert the conduit, and maybe tomorrow I’ll do the pour but the weather is iffy for tomorrow.

    Still, I’m very happy thus far how much more quickly this job has gone so far once I started at it yesterday and how well it has gone. The whole issue with diverting the conduit feed line was my biggest head scratcher, but as I showed yesterday, I got that worked out nicely using a spin pipe cutter.

    I find it amazing sometimes how I ponder about head scratcher tasks to undertake forever prior, and suddenly when I’m at the task at hand, a solution just suddenly pops in my head that is ideal. This is one of the things I love about renos. The problem solving and the fly by the seat of your pants solutions that come up. Keeps me going!

    Some pics for your wining and dining pleasure….

    Looks like a productive day. I am sure you will be happy when you get the concrete poured.

    I used a pipe cutter to shorten my conduit when I installed my LED outside light few weeks ago. It worked really good. I had a head scratcher moment too. Thinking what I was going use to cut the conduit. Then I thought of my pipe cutter wouldn’t be big enough for the job. It was just big enough for the job.

    Did you post that? Maybe I read it and didn’t even think about it at the time for my upcoming application and my mind was working subconsciously.

    #733539
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    Gonna get back on this this afternoon, need to excavate about 6 inches or so of crunbled dirt that worked itself off the inner hole walls since last year when I dug it. Frankly, I’m surprised it was that little.

    Got the dirt sucked out of the bottom of the pier hole for my lamp post using my old ShopVac. Glad I kept that old ShopVac just for such jobs. Worked dandy for this task as I don’t think it would have been good for me to use my clam shells digger due to my shoulder injury. Would have been too much raising my arm above my head repeatedly. I still can’t do a lot of stuff like that.

    I bought a 12 inch sonotube for it last nite, now I’m just debating how much should I leave of it above ground or just have it almost flush to the surrounding grade.

    I left it proud of the surrounding grade. Think I’ll set the concrete maybe an inch shy of the rim and use it as such to pool water on top of it for curing purposes til it starts to disolve. Recall from another thread, my bags of crete are over a year old, so curing becomes a concern and the longer than usual, the better. My pad pour from a week and a half ago is still being kept wet.

    I ran the conduit line into the Sonotube and it is now all set for the pour and there’s a couple of inches of crushed now already in the bottom. I filled in the surrounding area I dug up from the old pole to divert the conduit, and maybe tomorrow I’ll do the pour but the weather is iffy for tomorrow.

    Still, I’m very happy thus far how much more quickly this job has gone so far once I started at it yesterday and how well it has gone. The whole issue with diverting the conduit feed line was my biggest head scratcher, but as I showed yesterday, I got that worked out nicely using a spin pipe cutter.

    I find it amazing sometimes how I ponder about head scratcher tasks to undertake forever prior, and suddenly when I’m at the task at hand, a solution just suddenly pops in my head that is ideal. This is one of the things I love about renos. The problem solving and the fly by the seat of your pants solutions that come up. Keeps me going!

    Some pics for your wining and dining pleasure….

    Looks like a productive day. I am sure you will be happy when you get the concrete poured.

    I used a pipe cutter to shorten my conduit when I installed my LED outside light few weeks ago. It worked really good. I had a head scratcher moment too. Thinking what I was going use to cut the conduit. Then I thought of my pipe cutter wouldn’t be big enough for the job. It was just big enough for the job.

    Did you post that? Maybe I read it and didn’t even think about it at the time for my upcoming application and my mind was working subconsciously.

    I did post about installing the LED light. I don’t think I mentioned using the pipe cutter to cut the conduit.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #733574
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I used a pipe cutter to shorten my conduit when I installed my LED outside light few weeks ago. It worked really good. I had a head scratcher moment too. Thinking what I was going use to cut the conduit. Then I thought of my pipe cutter wouldn’t be big enough for the job. It was just big enough for the job.

    Tubing cutters can be a great solution in cutting smaller pipes and conduits in close quarters or when the raceway contains existing wiring that cannot be pulled back or replaced. For PVC it’s not a real issue, for metal conduit be very careful as a tubing cutter while makes a nice clean cut will create a slightly flared cut edge. That flared cut edge is on the outside and inside. It will nick the insulation of THHN or THWN conductors so be sure to use an appropriate deburrer at least on the inside edge.

    #733576
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I used a pipe cutter to shorten my conduit when I installed my LED outside light few weeks ago. It worked really good. I had a head scratcher moment too. Thinking what I was going use to cut the conduit. Then I thought of my pipe cutter wouldn’t be big enough for the job. It was just big enough for the job.

    Tubing cutters can be a great solution in cutting smaller pipes and conduits in close quarters or when the raceway contains existing wiring that cannot be pulled back or replaced. For PVC it’s not a real issue, for metal conduit be very careful as a tubing cutter while makes a nice clean cut will create a slightly flared cut edge. That flared cut edge is on the outside and inside. It will nick the insulation of THHN or THWN conductors so be sure to use an appropriate deburrer at least on the inside edge.

    Makes sense. This was my first tike ever dealing with cutting any kind of conduit where an existing wire couldn’t be pulled back. Just glad this event didn’t turn into a disaster with that issue.

    I did post about installing the LED light. I don’t think I mentioned using the pipe cutter to cut the conduit.

    I didn’t think you had. No matter, it got figured out just at the right moment.

    #735431
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Finally poured the pier for the new driveway/front yard lamp post.

    The contraption they had in the kit for setting the mounting pins was awful. Made my own work-around for it. An old triangular base plate from the previous lamp post that was removed I kept from 18 years ago for the new one was handy to have in building the work-around ply leveller I made for that. Really helped to set a base that I could determine was fairly level and would need minimal adjustments to make sure the post base once I attach it is perfectly vertically level.

    I can tell regardless I’m gonna want to use my 5 inch cup shaped Bosch concrete surface grinder to flatten out and bevel a bit of the perimeter once I allow it to cure for a while and remove the Sonotube form. In setting short of the top of the Sonotube’s upper rim and using that custom ply leveller, the outer perimeter stands a bit proud where the ply doesn’t come into contact with. Should be an easy enough job contouring the outer edge to be just right with the surface grinder.

    This job was a bit trickier for setting the mounting pins despite my planning and my ply base plate leveller I made for it, but I think I got it done right. Fingers crossed on that.

    It was real hard to sink the pins with their dog leg ends and have them sink and stay nice and vertical. I like my concrete mix stiff, so it made it more challenging in that regard also. A lot of shimmy shifting around was needed, and also using my Makita 18V concrete vibrator against the outside of the Sonotube at that stage helped a lot.

    Sorry, no pics of end of day results. Just had to move on to other things before nightfall.

    #735988
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Pier is still wet curing. Probably keep the sonotube loaded up with water til the weekend, then I’ll let it dry. Amazingly, the top two inches of tube that holds the pool of water on top is still intact and I only need to reload it with water every 2-3 days right now. I’ll need to use my 5in surface grinder a bit to clean up and bevel the top before slapping on the new post once I tear away the sonotube.

    #736193
    Doobie
    Moderator

    After a week and half of having a pond at the top of the pier, figured is was long enough, so I took the frame off and tore down the sonotube to just below grade.

    Hoping to cup grind the top to shape and install the new lamp post on the weekend.

    #736347
    Doobie
    Moderator

    This afternoon was install day.

    Of course, the pins didn’t fit nicely into the base. Had to do some work for that, but I managed.

    Surface ground the surface nice, but because the crete was still green, I would pull out the odd rock. A small crack had developed near one of the pins also trying to bang it straight, so I decided to skim the top with concrete patch repair once I had gotten it level. Prettied up the still visible perimeter of the top nice and I also have it such that water will drain off nicely.

    The pins didn’t extend quite far enough for the lock washers, so I used red loctite to fasten the bolts.

    The worst bugger was at the end with these itsy bitsy screws I needed to screw on for hold down clips for the glass shades. I was swearing quite a lot at an imaginary chinaman for a while there, but I managed. Why is so much electrical lighting stuff seems so often to have some element that is so half arsed designed?

    Still have to dirt fill around it. But it’s done for all the fun stuff. Let there be light!

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