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Soldering wire

This topic contains 48 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  NealXu 1 year, 6 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 49 total)
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  • #616257

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    So did it work? I have to assume so, I am successful at soldering, not proficient, and I have to redo some wiring on my small trailer, so I am thinking I will do some soldered splices on some of the wires. I saw this online, has anyone else done this?:
    http://makezine.com/2012/02/28/how-to-splice-wire-to-nasa-standards/

    I’ve heard of the linesman’s splice, but just twisting the wires around each other (without the end loops over straight wire) then saturate with solder is pretty damn strong already, so I’m not sure it’s necessary.

    #618051

    BMI
    Pro

    Or you can probably just use a little alligator clip or something if there’s not much room to work. Just make sure you don’t solder the clip to the pin

    I have done exactly that. Beware….

    #618206

    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    Or you can probably just use a little alligator clip or something if there’s not much room to work. Just make sure you don’t solder the clip to the pin

    I have done exactly that. Beware….

    Hopefully it was a simple desoldering to fix it?

    #618221

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Or you can probably just use a little alligator clip or something if there’s not much room to work. Just make sure you don’t solder the clip to the pin

    I have done exactly that. Beware….

    Hopefully it was a simple desoldering to fix it?

    In my case that is all it took. You just have to be careful. Sometimes you really need 3 hands.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #618278

    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    The desoldering ropes can be pretty handy in those situations

    #619604

    CB
    Pro

    Photos of two different types of alligator clips used in soldering…

    1. The steel alligator clips of the third hand, that I put protective black nylon vacuum cap “boots” over to keep the serrated teeth from digging into the wire insulation and leaving a “set” after the insulation softened temporarily from the wire conducting the heat from the iron, and…

    2. All aluminum alligator clips that function solely as heat sinks to conduct the heat away from the wire insulation.

    #619701

    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    Photos of two different types of alligator clips used in soldering…

    1. The steel alligator clips of the third hand, that I put protective black nylon vacuum cap “boots” over to keep the serrated teeth from digging into the wire insulation and leaving a “set” after the insulation softened temporarily from the wire conducting the heat from the iron, and…

    2. All aluminum alligator clips that function solely as heat sinks to conduct the heat away from the wire insulation.

    Nice pics, is that your setup at home?

    #619793

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Photos of two different types of alligator clips used in soldering…

    1. The steel alligator clips of the third hand, that I put protective black nylon vacuum cap “boots” over to keep the serrated teeth from digging into the wire insulation and leaving a “set” after the insulation softened temporarily from the wire conducting the heat from the iron, and…

    2. All aluminum alligator clips that function solely as heat sinks to conduct the heat away from the wire insulation.

    I like the idea of the rubber “boots” over the alligator clips. ThanX for the photo @cb

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #619909

    CB
    Pro

    Nice pics, is that your setup at home?

    That’s my set up wherever and whenever I need to solder electronics. At home, on a job, at a neighbors, where ever.

    I used to keep the soldering station all tucked away in a dedicated drawer in one of my tool carts, but ended up getting a dedicated box for it instead, as more often than not, I take the set up to what needs soldering, rather than bring what needs soldering to a set up.

    I bought that soldering station to build an amplifier. This was back in the days before IBM invented the PC, so at some point prior to 1981, but I can’t remember exactly when. In those days, it was more common to build electronics stuff, like Heathkits, etc.

    #619925

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    That’s my set up wherever and whenever I need to solder electronics. At home, on a job, at a neighbors, where ever.

    Very nice setup. Looks handy.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #619938

    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    Let’s see some more pictures of that soldering station

    #619992

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    I bought that soldering station to build an amplifier. This was back in the days before IBM invented the PC, so at some point prior to 1981, but I can’t remember exactly when. In those days, it was more common to build electronics stuff, like Heathkits, etc.

    The older Weller kit were the best. I have one that has to be 30+ years old.
    Been looking at a newer kit with a hot air attachment to complement my Weller.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #620130

    CB
    Pro

    Let’s see some more pictures of that soldering station

    Per your request… here is one scenario at the FRONT of a vehicle, under the engine compartment. I first had to set up the station on a lawn chair, near the fender where the fuse box was, because the wiring was part of the main vehicle harness… not something that could be brought inside to a work bench.

    #620133

    CB
    Pro

    Let’s see some more pictures of that soldering station

    And here is another scenario INSIDE the vehicle, again due to the wiring being a part of the vehicle harness, even though the equipment I was adding (two rear view cameras, and an EMF choke) was not.

    I never use ScotchLoks or other clip on wire connectors, due to their long term lack of reliability. Vehicle vibrations can fully sever the wire that ScotchLoks started to sever when they were installed. So I don’t use them.

    Instead, I flux clean, pre tin, crimp, solder, and dual layer heat shrink all vehicular wire connections.

    #620138

    CB
    Pro

    Let’s see some more pictures of that soldering station

    And finally, to run the full gamut from front to rear, here is a scenario of temporary solder station set up at the REAR of the vehicle. I first set up the solder station on a card board table, for part of the project.

    Then I moved underneath the rear of the vehicle. I needed to add 6 separately fused circuits on a bus so that additional accessories could be more easily powered later. I often use lugs and eyelets that don’t have any insulation covering on them, because those don’t offer any protection against corrosion. And under the vehicle is exposed to lots of conditions for corrosion.

    After crimping bare lugs (no pre-tinning prior to crimping, because I want the strands to better conform to the crimp), I will then liquid flux clean, solder, and use dual layer self adhesive heat shrink. In this instance, I added a third layer of heat shrink with a number attached, because I had to reverse the order pre printed on the fuse bus, due to reasons too tangential to explain here.

    Soldering above the head is fun. Drip. Drip. Ouch!

    #620167

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    here is a scenario of temporary solder station set up at the REAR of the vehicle.

    That station looks really nice. Also nice work on the soldering.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #620177

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    @cb that looks nice, you seem to know quite a bit about soldering, have you taken courses or worked in the industry?
    nice job on the camera installation, was that your car.

    #620231

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    After crimping bare lugs (no pre-tinning prior to crimping, because I want the strands to better conform to the crimp), I will then liquid flux clean, solder, and use dual layer self adhesive heat shrink. In this instance, I added a third layer of heat shrink with a number attached, because I had to reverse the order pre printed on the fuse bus

    I really like the setup up have @cb. Nice clean install.

    I have been using the double heat shrink method for years now. One way to guaranty a good solder joint.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #620240

    Anonymous

    I never use ScotchLoks or other clip on wire connectors, due to their long term lack of reliability. Vehicle vibrations can fully sever the wire that ScotchLoks started to sever when they were installed. So I don’t use them.

    Nice clean connections and the added fuse box looks super clean too.

    Scotchlocks suck, Especially when used on the exterior for like trailer wiring but I don’t use them anywhere. Whenever someone comes to me with a trailer wiring problem the first thing I ask is IF they used Scotchlocks….The only good thing about them is I immediately know what the problem is lol, Makes for a quick easy fix

    #620252

    CB
    Pro

    Scotchlocks suck, Especially when used on the exterior for like trailer wiring but I don’t use them anywhere. Whenever someone comes to me with a trailer wiring problem the first thing I ask is IF they used Scotchlocks…. The only good thing about them is I immediately know what the problem is lol, Makes for a quick easy fix.

    LOL! Agreed!

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