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Soldering wire

This topic contains 47 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  CB 8 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 48 total)
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  • #614131

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    OK I yanked a couple of wires off a key switch with pin connectors.

    I need to resolder them and I have never soldered wire.

    I have access to an iron but what tips can brush up on prior to doing it? For starters… I assume I need to heat up the pin to soften old material and remove it first.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #614149

    Austin
    Pro
    Covington, KY

    I have done quite a bit of soldering on my car. One thing I have found helpful is propping the wire. Using an acid to clean and I guess etch it makes it go so much easier. The solder will just get sucked in. Also make sure you have a quality iron. I have used some cheapos and they just make it a struggle.

    #614171

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    One tip use the thinnest solder wire possible. It heats faster. Most people buy the thick stuff and can’t get it to melt properly. The thick stuff sold in the big box stores is for plumbing.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #614173

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Not sure how I would hold the wire against pin while holding the iron and solder.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #614181

    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    It helps if you can make something to hold everything for you to free up your hands. I’ve been doing a lot of soldering lately so I 3d printed some accessories to help me out. You con make something similar pretty easily out of wood too.

    #614182

    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    Or you can probably just use a little alligator clip or something if there’s not much room to work. Just make sure you don’t solder the clip to the pin

    #614202

    I agree with Austin, make sure you have a good quality iron. I had a cheap iron and it didn’t solder properly and made repairs more difficult than they needed to be. It also ends up costing more in the long run because you buy a cheap iron and then when it doesn’t work properly you go buy the iron the you should have in the first place. Just my two cents.

    Mark

    #614211

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    Pre Tin the wire first, that will assist to solder the wire to the pin with just two hands. Then if needed to, you have a free hand to hold the solder line to the joint.

    A third hand is always helpful but only buy one if you plan to do more soldering.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #614220

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Exactly what Bill Kyle and Frank said and like Austin mentioned a good iron is always good.

    We always pre tin the wires, and use the smaller solder wire

    We have special clamps and vises here, but the alligator clips are great

    It’s kinda like plumbing heat the contact then let the solder pull into the weld but just not to to hot

    #614255

    Anonymous

    I assume I need to heat up the pin to soften old material and remove it first.

    All of the above are good tips. Thin solder, flux, And get the pin and wire hot first…….If you need to remove the old solder and broken wire from the pin you might consider a solder sucker tool. Get it hot and suck it out

    #614448

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    The key thing is keep the components steady while solder solidifies. If solder cools down properly it’s shiny silver looking, if it’s matte gray looking it’s been bumped and strength is compromised.

    The proper way to melt solder is to heat the components with your iron, then touch the components, not your iron, with solder till it melts. This way you know the components are hot enough to bond.

    Search for “third hand” on amazon, they make soldering tiny things much easier.

    If the components are tiny then the only way to hand solder them is pre-tin both sides, then hold them in place tightly, remelt the solder with iron and let it cool. I’ve soldered micro-USB connectors back onto boards this way, those individual legs are seriously tiny.

    #614468

    A higher wattage iron helps. The heat is on the component for a shorter length of time.

    You don’t melt the solder with the iron, you heat the connection and flow the solder with that. You can melt a bit with the tip to the wire to help the heat transfer faster. This is all dependent on room to work too. For delicate components, an alligator clip between where you are soldering and the actual component, will act as a heat sink and will help protect the component. Again…depending on the room you have.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #614528

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I 3d printed some accessories to help me out. You con make something similar pretty easily out of wood too.

    Those look pretty handy Kyle. I use an accessory called Third Hand. Lots of different models available if you do a search.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #614545

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Thanks guys, I have to get some flux and wire. I am going to borrow an iron. Not sure about wattage and things like that but…..

    This would be a handy skill to have. Even if very rarely used.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #614584

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    The key thing is keep the components steady while solder solidifies. If solder cools down properly it’s shiny silver looking, if it’s matte gray looking it’s been bumped and strength is compromised.

    @jzmtl,
    Good point about the solder having to look shiny when done. Grey solder joint is also considered a “Cold Joint” and should be redone.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #614589

    I have no clue about the wire I use. It is from a huge roll that is decades old do I suspect it is still the old fashioned lead type solder….the good stuff.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #614598

    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Thanks guys, I have to get some flux and wire. I am going to borrow an iron. Not sure about wattage and things like that but…..

    This would be a handy skill to have. Even if very rarely used.

    Make sure you don’t get flux or solder for plumbing, those are acid based and no good for electrical stuff.

    Actually all the solder wires are rosin cored and no need for separate flux, just clean the wires before hand with alcohol.

    #614601

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Well it’s done I’ll have to bring it back to the job site and test it to see if it works I don’t know what could go wrong. Sturdy connection not very neat but sturdy.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #616020

    So did it work? I have to assume so, I am successful at soldering, not proficient, and I have to redo some wiring on my small trailer, so I am thinking I will do some soldered splices on some of the wires. I saw this online, has anyone else done this?:
    http://makezine.com/2012/02/28/how-to-splice-wire-to-nasa-standards/

    Will

    #616021

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Yeah it worked. If the connections are clean and you used flux then melting solder into the joint is cake. Unlike plumbing you can’t wipe joints and it cools down quicker with and iron than a torch so…..Not as neat.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

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