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Simple shed const

This topic contains 27 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  TopNotch 1 day, 7 hours ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 28 total)
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  • #733284

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Hi guys I havent been around in a while, I hope all is well.

    SO I have to build a 12×12 on a slab. I have 3 areas Im wrestling with.

    1. I wanted to use LP Smartside since it comes primed but then I have to cut in let in braces since its not structural. That or T-111 does double duty but needs priming.
    2. I was thinking of using treated 4×4 sill on the slab then regular 2x on top of it. Im thinking of the rain splatter at the base and a 4×4 would be more durable than a regular 2x sill. Adding the extra sill allows future replacement.
    3. The doors The plywood for doors with angle iron on inside perimeter to prevent warping and keep it light or 2x framing

    I know it elementary stuff but I can overthink the littlest things LOL so I always welcome hearing thoughts

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #733311

    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    I build a lot sheds, it seems. 😆

    I use wood we mill ourselves up at the ranch for a lot of ranch buildings, and because of that, I have to use let in bracing.

    It works, but it makes the inside funky. Unless you’re doing wall covering on the inside. And it takes longer.

    I’d rather spend the time priming T1-11, over cutting in let in braces, personally.

    My hands down favorite ay to do utility/outbuildings, is with a course or 2 of block, and the walls on top.

    True, you have to lift the walls up on top of the block, but for short walls, it’s not too bad.

    It makes for an extremely easy to clean interior, and eliminates wall rot on the outside.

    I always frame my doors just like a residential unit.

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #733315

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    is with a course or 2 of block, and the walls on top.

    I recently build a shen on some blocks too. It worked well. I use a 36″ steel entry door and steel studs with LP smart side on the out side.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #733331

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Interesting. Never see block at least not on Simple sheds

    Mostly prefabs here cheaper than I can build often. craned into the yard

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #733332

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    LP has a product in their Smartside line that is stranded and comes in sheets like T-111 that you can get primed from the factory and it will provide the shear you need for the walls. It was made for tract builders to use as a siding and sheeting combination .

    https://lpcorp.com/products/exterior/siding-trim/products/panel-vertical-siding

    In the link, the Cedar Texture is footnoted that it is a fiber product and not approved for structural use but the other 4 options are not footnoted and a stranded product and approved for structural. If you click on the other options the footnote goes away. The website is a little misleading the way it is set up. My Neighbor used to be an LP rep so I would get all the information on what they were doing with their products from him. I do remember him saying the stranded product is a rated sheeting also.

    As for the treated 4 x 4 on the slab, we typically lay a 4″ x 4″ block around the perimeter of the slab that is dowelled into the slab and then frame our walls on it. It keeps everything out of the water and gives the exterior a good separation from the siding to the dirt.

    #733334

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Interesting. Never see block at least not on Simple sheds

    Mostly prefabs here cheaper than I can build often. craned into the yard

    The blocks were already there and that why I built on top.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #733336

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Good call on the LP stranded, didnt see that option

    What to you mean doweling 4×4 block? Just mortar and random anchors?

    I have a 13×13 slab and was going to build a 12×12 or 12-6 x 12-6 so I have some edge distance for soil

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #733356

    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    Here’s a couple of pics of some I’ve done.

    First is actually a garage, but same deal.

    Second is on pier blocks, with 4×6 PT skids below.

    Third is one I built up at the ranch, completely from wood milled on the property. Is has diagonal bracing inside. I set it on 16×16 poured concrete footings.

    Fourth is actually a chicken coop, but I did the block perimeter on it. Just has a dirt floor inside, but it would be easy to pour a slab inside.

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #733382

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Nice work Seven Delta.

    I have to resist over building a shed and turning it into a cool little house. I have a 3k budget.

    I would use strips of APP rubber under those deck sleepers btw.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #733384

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I think you are better building to the edge of the slab and allowing water to run down the wall and on to the ground. anytime I have seen a concrete ledge outside the walls, there is a chance for water to get under the walls. In some way it works it self under the wall when the caulk fails

    #733386

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Interesting. Never see block at least not on Simple sheds

    Mostly prefabs here cheaper than I can build often. craned into the yard

    Same here , either on a concrete pad or a typical 2x material framing , some do it in PT floor framing , or just plain old 2x I have done a few with concrete pads , just nail or screw down the sill to the pad , as for the exterior , it’s either aluminum or pvc siding and laps over the edge of the concrete pad , so no worries about that bottom plate sitting in water ?

    If that’s what I am understanding.
    How would that outside be finished.

    #733405

    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    I would use strips of APP rubber under those deck sleepers btw.

    Not familiar with that product. What is it?

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #733408

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    It’s Torch/RubberRoid. It’s about 1/4″ thick. Just don’t bond it.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #733412

    Sprokitz
    Pro
    Eastern shore of, Pa

    I think you are better building to the edge of the slab and allowing water to run down the wall and on to the ground. anytime I have seen a concrete ledge outside the walls, there is a chance for water to get under the walls. In some way it works it self under the wall when the caulk fails

    I couldn’t agree more. For some reason my summer place is on a slab and they left the back wall 2 ft short of the edge of the slab. When I opened up that wall I swept up the bottom plate, it looked like potting soil.

    #733414

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    Well there is such thing as eaves.

    I get the thought process though and I could see that happening I probably have it as well.

    I was actually thinking of doing a bottom band of one by with drip edge to protect the siding.

    A couple of pieces of boral 4 trim won’t break the budget.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #733449

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Here’s a couple of pics of some I’ve done.

    First is actually a garage, but same deal.

    Second is on pier blocks, with 4×6 PT skids below.

    Third is one I built up at the ranch, completely from wood milled on the property. Is has diagonal bracing inside. I set it on 16×16 poured concrete footings.

    Fourth is actually a chicken coop, but I did the block perimeter on it. Just has a dirt floor inside, but it would be easy to pour a slab inside.

    Those are really nice. Much bigger than what we would call a shed. Maybe a ADU and they would all need permits.

    I wish I had a shed that big. Mine is 6’6″X8′

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #733450

    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    Here’s a couple of pics of some I’ve done.

    First is actually a garage, but same deal.

    Second is on pier blocks, with 4×6 PT skids below.

    Third is one I built up at the ranch, completely from wood milled on the property. Is has diagonal bracing inside. I set it on 16×16 poured concrete footings.

    Fourth is actually a chicken coop, but I did the block perimeter on it. Just has a dirt floor inside, but it would be easy to pour a slab inside.

    Those are really nice. Much bigger than what we would call a shed. Maybe a ADU and they would all need permits.

    I wish I had a shed that big. Mine is 6’6″X8′

    Thanks you!

    Some of those did need permits.

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #733476

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Some of those did need permits.

    We can build up 120sq.ft. with out a permit if it cost under 1,000$ really can’t hard to do. Then we have to keep the 5′ setback rules.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #733526

    Doobie
    Moderator

    Some of those did need permits.

    We can build up 120sq.ft. with out a permit if it cost under 1,000$ really can’t hard to do. Then we have to keep the 5′ setback rules.

    Five feet eh! Here, to prop line/fence, it’s 2 feet.

    #733563

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I think you are better building to the edge of the slab and allowing water to run down the wall and on to the ground. anytime I have seen a concrete ledge outside the walls, there is a chance for water to get under the walls. In some way it works it self under the wall when the caulk fails

    I’ve seen that as well. Good advice to let the water drip on to the ground rather than on the cement.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

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