dcsimg

Silica Dust Enforcement SetBack

This topic contains 32 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by  utopia78 2 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 33 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #621898

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I see there is a delay in the silica dust enforcement. I wonder why? Everyone knew it was coming, or maybe not???

    https://www.protoolreviews.com/news/osha-silica-dust-permissible-exposure-limit-2016/25129/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=osha_delays_silica_dust_enforcement_plus_the_latest_news_reviews_for_pros&utm_term=2017-04-13

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #621906

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    The National Association of Homebuilders pushed to delay and rescind this rule. along with several entities.

    OSHA estimated it costing 5.5 billion for the industry to comply with the rule annually, while the industry estimate 55 billion.

    The rule also requires health monitoring of all employees that are exposed at a cost of about $400 per employee per year.

    #621908

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    The National Association of Homebuilders pushed to delay and rescind this rule. along with several entities.

    OSHA estimated it costing 5.5 billion for the industry to comply with the rule annually, while the industry estimate 55 billion.

    The rule also requires health monitoring of all employees that are exposed at a cost of about $400 per employee per year.

    So there will be a lot of people making a lot of money off the workers staying healthy.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #621912

    bethepro
    Keymaster
    Mt Prospect, IL

    For most of the country enforcement date has been moved to 9/23/17. In California though, they have their own standard and they have not said if they are going to move to the 9/23 date. As of now it is 6/23/17 that it is to be enforced in Calif. But that could change. OSHA wanted to give a little more time for construction companies to come into compliance. If you haven’t seen it, the Bosch PRO+GUARD lineup offers a full range of tools, accessories and attachments that help companies move towards compliancy. Check it out here.

    Email us at bethepro@bethepro.com

    #621927

    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    even though it cost money, its probably better for the worker long term to be healthier and live longer lives.

    #621929

    The National Association of Homebuilders pushed to delay and rescind this rule. along with several entities.

    OSHA estimated it costing 5.5 billion for the industry to comply with the rule annually, while the industry estimate 55 billion.

    The rule also requires health monitoring of all employees that are exposed at a cost of about $400 per employee per year.

    So there will be a lot of people making a lot of money off the workers staying healthy.

    Or, lots of healthy people not going bankrupt paying medical bills

    Although I guess it is a drain on the social security system when they dont drop dead 5 minutes before retirement

    As a taxpayer, I like anything that lowers the cost of medical care. And if that means more high end dust collection designed into tools, I like that as a consumer

    Since Im not commercial site tradesman, I cant imagine what you guys think, but better working conditions sounds like a good thing

    #621941

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Unfortunately it will be like all other regulations. Some companies will take it serious and protect their workers and others will not. Many workers will not take it serious and use the protections they are given. Whenever possible we use water to cut or use a HEPA vac on the saw, grinder or drill. We have dustless shrouds on grinders and dustless kits for the drills. We bought all of this before it was law.

    Fall protection is the same way. You give the workers the protection and they do not want it, you almost have to threaten to fire them to get them to use it. They still resist.

    The RRP (lead Law) is another good example, great intentions to reduce the chances of lead poisoning in children. The paperwork required is incredible. we will not work on homes where it comes into play (Pre 1978) just so we do not have to deal with it. Most contractors just do the work and ignore the precautions they are supposed to take. I am not willing to take the chance and don’t need the work that bad. The EPA could write millions if not billions of dollars in fines for this if they opened their eyes and actually tried to enforce the law instead of just hoping people will.

    AS for the dust collection and dust mitigating accessories for tools, I will say that Bosch and Hilti lead he pack

    #621956

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    AS for the dust collection and dust mitigating accessories for tools, I will say that Bosch and Hilti lead he pack

    That is definitely the case in my area Kurt. Most sites make zero attempt to collect silica dust, but the ones that do are using Bosch or Hilti tools.

    Sadly, even the city and their subcontractors make no effort to contain the dust when they are working. Their poor employees pull their shirts over their mouth and nose when they are cutting…Its no wonder that the enforcement date has been delayed!

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #621961

    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    i first the announcement to move it back about 4 days ago. jim obviously has the full story on it.

    when i heard my guess was that it had to do with combination educating contractors about it and the financial side as they will have to drop the coin to get the equipment. maybe not every company has the cash flow to fully outfit them self all at once so this gives them a little more time

    this regulation is for the U.S obviously, as of right now as i havent heard of any official regulations in canada.. out west there is already some rules in place but nothing cemented nation wide.

    heres a tip, dont fart in a space suit

    #621986

    Masterbosch
    Pro
    Wayne, NJ

    Sooner or later they gonna enforce it. plus it’s better for are own health as a construction worker. If your boss makes money off you he should take care of your health. I try keep myself updated I try to collect much as possible when I am working with any material not just silica dust. Saw dust just as bad for your lungs

    plusoneconstructionllc@gmail.com

    #622000

    Doobie
    Pro

    this regulation is for the U.S obviously, as of right now as i havent heard of any official regulations in canada.. out west there is already some rules in place but nothing cemented nation wide.

    I was gonna ask that. Thanks for mentioning it.

    #622017

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    The National Association of Homebuilders pushed to delay and rescind this rule. along with several entities.

    OSHA estimated it costing 5.5 billion for the industry to comply with the rule annually, while the industry estimate 55 billion.

    The rule also requires health monitoring of all employees that are exposed at a cost of about $400 per employee per year.

    Those are some big costs that are going to have to be recouped through higher prices. Hopefully they are allowing the industry to figure out how to do it.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #622028

    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I think we have heard similar arguments about fall restraints, guards on grinders, asbestos precautions and so on.

    IMO health concerns, where they are justified are worth making the investment. Pay a little now or a lot later seems to be the choice, but, in the meantime, the dust continues to do damage.

    There are only two ways to do things; the right way and again.

    #622044

    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    this regulation is for the U.S obviously, as of right now as i havent heard of any official regulations in canada.. out west there is already some rules in place but nothing cemented nation wide.

    I was gonna ask that. Thanks for mentioning it.

    I was wondering about the same, I’m sure eventually it will filter up here and impact Canadian regulations.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #622057

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Personally I think it’s good, first for the employee working in that all day, and secondary for the company and also the client,

    It’s definitely going to have people for and against it
    Just like when they added the safety glasses regulation in our shop.

    I know I can say that I definitely appreciate when the company will support my demand for health concerns about the conditions with the hazardous materials I use on a daily basis.

    I work with hazardous and explosive material everyday,

    The end result if anything happens, just doesn’t effect myself, but my family, and to me, that’s the difference.

    I am definitely for this.

    #622059

    this regulation is for the U.S obviously, as of right now as i havent heard of any official regulations in canada.. out west there is already some rules in place but nothing cemented nation wide.

    I was gonna ask that. Thanks for mentioning it.

    I was wondering about the same, I’m sure eventually it will filter up here and impact Canadian regulations.

    And at least the equipment sold here will have to start being compliant, even if the rules dont appear

    #622060

    kswiss
    Pro
    edmonton, AB

    I’d rather be safe than put my health at risk

    #622066

    brianpeters
    Pro
    Murray, KY

    Dumb question, but does drywall dust fall in this category?

    #622081

    Doobie
    Pro

    Dumb question, but does drywall dust fall in this category?

    Good question. I would think it does.

    this regulation is for the U.S obviously, as of right now as i havent heard of any official regulations in canada.. out west there is already some rules in place but nothing cemented nation wide.

    I was gonna ask that. Thanks for mentioning it.

    I was wondering about the same, I’m sure eventually it will filter up here and impact Canadian regulations.

    We may already have it in place. I thought I’d read something somewhere a few years ago that silica dust abatement on site was required here in Canada, but seeing recent jobs near me with paving stone contractors in my neoghborhood using squat when sawing stones in a plume of dust and usually with not even using a cheapo paper dust mask, is it? Or do they just choose to ignore it because that’s the way they’ve always done it and it simply doesn’t get policed.

    #622092

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Fall protection is the same way. You give the workers the protection and they do not want it, you almost have to threaten to fire them to get them to use it. They still resist.

    Kurt It has been a long time I haven’t worked on the roof on the commercial job but I hear now if the company gives you the fall protection and you are caught not using it , you the employee get the fine.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 33 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

queries. 0.552 seconds